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Old 11-27-2015, 12:14 PM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
Most of the cities seem to have a blighted urban core and sprawling suburbs. I'm guessing that a good deal of the available homes are cheap homes in areas few people want to live. Drives down the average and makes the metro seem somewhat more affordable than picky home buyers actually experience.
Interesting view if one hasn't visited those cities and relies on perception value. Outside of Hartford, Birmingham and Memphis (personally unsure of those three) the rest have a substantial number of desirable core neighborhoods that continue to appreciate in value, along with other neighborhoods transitioning to similar levels. The trend in recent years has involved fairly rapid deterioration of inner ring suburbs (similar to 70s "white flight") to outer ring suburbs or rebuilding inner city neighborhoods where most of the sweat equity is to be had.
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Old 11-27-2015, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
3,114 posts, read 2,524,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
What areas are you referring to in regards to your posts and in relation to the list?

I believe this shows relatively recent information in regards to average annual pay/salary by metro area and may show it by county and even town/city: May 2014 Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Area Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates

More here: Overview of BLS Wage Data by Area and Occupation

Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages

BEA Regional Economic Accounts
Metros like St. Louis, Cleveland, Detroit still have terribly blighted areas that nobody reading Forbes is going to move to.
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Old 11-27-2015, 02:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
Metros like St. Louis, Cleveland, Detroit still have terribly blighted areas that nobody reading Forbes is going to move to.
And neighborhoods where they would, you're using a broad brush to paint the entire city something it isn't. Some say the entire city of Syracuse is a depressed dump. Would you refer to that as accurate?
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Old 11-27-2015, 04:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
And neighborhoods where they would, you're using a broad brush to paint the entire city something it isn't. Some say the entire city of Syracuse is a depressed dump. Would you refer to that as accurate?
No and I was thinking the same thing in regards to your previous post. While there are undesirable neighborhoods within those cities, there are still quite a few desirable neighborhoods within those cities. Basically, give or take, they are like most American cities.
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Old 11-27-2015, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
And neighborhoods where they would, you're using a broad brush to paint the entire city something it isn't. Some say the entire city of Syracuse is a depressed dump. Would you refer to that as accurate?
Most of Syracuse proper is blighted and you can buy most city houses for a song. The suburbs are nice and relatively cheap. The blighted areas drive the average metro price even lower, even though few people with two dimes to rub together would live there.

People in the Syracuse area have always been under the mistaken impression that the area's "affordability" would lead to a population spike. Hasn't worked out so far.
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Old 11-27-2015, 10:28 PM
 
Location: USA
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Not surprised to see Hartford on here though the city of Hartford is poor, many people forget to realize that its suburbs are very affluent. I believe the Hartford area is one of the wealthiest metropolitan areas in the country. Unfortunately over the past few decades I've noticed the COL to climb a little bit. CT introduced income tax in the early 90's and property taxes and sales tax have skyrocketed....yet wages are nearly unchanged.
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Old 11-28-2015, 07:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
Most of Syracuse proper is blighted and you can buy most city houses for a song. The suburbs are nice and relatively cheap. The blighted areas drive the average metro price even lower, even though few people with two dimes to rub together would live there.

People in the Syracuse area have always been under the mistaken impression that the area's "affordability" would lead to a population spike. Hasn't worked out so far.
I don't think people in the area are under that impression in regards to the affordability, eventhough the metro has actually had slight population growth in recent years.

It is a city where Downtown, the University area and the outer neighborhoods are at least solid to very nice, while the inner neighborhoods are more blighted. With the latter, it depends on the side of town in terms of area/severity. Much/most of the East Side rivals many suburban areas in terms of income and home prices, while Eastwood(essentially the NE corner of the city), the Court-Woodlawn area(N Side), Sedgwick(N Side), Tipperary Hill(W Side), Strathmore(SW Corner), Winkworth(SW Corner into Onondaga), Elmwood up the hill(SW Corner), South Valley/southof Seneca Turnpike(S Side) and Lincoln Hill north of the park(N/NE Side) are some of the outer neighborhoods that come to mind. There's also some areas that have seen some gentrification/revitalization like parts of the Near(inner) West Side, the Park Ave neighborhood between Downtown and Geddes Street and the Hawley-Green neighborhood just N/NE of Downtown and the University.

You can still find affordable suburban homes in many solid to nice older areas. So, the median home price isn't driven by cheap urban homes, as that could be the case for just about any city due to blighted/bad neighborhoods.
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Old 11-28-2015, 07:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by HumpDay View Post
Not surprised to see Hartford on here though the city of Hartford is poor, many people forget to realize that its suburbs are very affluent. I believe the Hartford area is one of the wealthiest metropolitan areas in the country. Unfortunately over the past few decades I've noticed the COL to climb a little bit. CT introduced income tax in the early 90's and property taxes and sales tax have skyrocketed....yet wages are nearly unchanged.
Does Hartford have any desirable or at least solid urban neighborhoods.
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Old 11-28-2015, 07:28 AM
 
1,049 posts, read 699,441 times
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Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Did a 12-year sentence in Dallas. Great place to work, but a very underwhelming place to live.
How so?
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Old 11-29-2015, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,554 posts, read 10,261,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtt99 View Post
How so?
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
DFW is the indoor capital of America. More strip malls and chain restaurants than you can shake a stick at. Scenic beauty? Almost non-existent. It's flat, it's humid, and it's hotter than hell from mid-June til mid-September.
There's simply nothing spectacular about the Metroplex. It's a job hub with cheap houses, plenty of shopping, and decent food. That's about it. I've said before it's like Omaha on steroids - except, ironically, Omaha is hillier.
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