U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Should PR become a state?
Yes 64 44.44%
No 61 42.36%
Maybe 19 13.19%
Voters: 144. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-23-2015, 01:50 PM
 
Location: La Isla Encanta, Puerto Rico
1,147 posts, read 3,032,474 times
Reputation: 1312

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Logicist027 View Post
My opinion... Yes. Why?



4. Americans could learn Spanish, it isn't too much to ask. We only speak 1 language and learning another major world language isn't going to harm anyone nor place too much of a burden on people. If anything, this would effectively make it possible for almost the entire Western Hemisphere to be culturally accessible to the average American.


Disclaimer: I am not Puerto Rican



I agree that most Americans could and should "learn Spanish", at least a working knowledge. It's not like English is so rare any mainlanders visiting the new 51st PR really would HAVE TO learn Spanish, but it sure wouldn't hurt them. I think if you had the USA being a bilingual country English/Spanish like Canada is English/French with both languages taught from Kindergarten-on, it would make all Americans much more competitive - not just for jobs in the Mexican border states, Florida, and Puerto Rico - but for Mexico, Central America, and South America for high-tech value-add jobs and marketing to those Spanish-speaking people. Also, you can add Spain in Europe and Equatorial Guinea in Africa. In addition, you'd have a great head-start to learning Portuguese (about 90% of vocabulary the same as Spanish - just learn the nasal pronounciation and a few new words) to handle the huge up-and-coming Brazil, Portugal, Angola, and Mozambique. We need to change our "Speak Amurikan in Amurika" yokel attitude and become more internationally competitive. This means people-skills/soft-skills for relations building and marketing - not just being the best technologically. More than 50% of the population in The America's speaks Iberian, not English.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-23-2015, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,188 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamba_boy View Post
I agree that most Americans could and should "learn Spanish", at least a working knowledge. It's not like English is so rare any mainlanders visiting the new 51st PR really would HAVE TO learn Spanish, but it sure wouldn't hurt them. I think if you had the USA being a bilingual country English/Spanish like Canada is English/French with both languages taught from Kindergarten-on, it would make all Americans much more competitive - not just for jobs in the Mexican border states, Florida, and Puerto Rico - but for Mexico, Central America, and South America for high-tech value-add jobs and marketing to those Spanish-speaking people. Also, you can add Spain in Europe and Equatorial Guinea in Africa. In addition, you'd have a great head-start to learning Portuguese (about 90% of vocabulary the same as Spanish - just learn the nasal pronounciation and a few new words) to handle the huge up-and-coming Brazil, Portugal, Angola, and Mozambique. We need to change our "Speak Amurikan in Amurika" yokel attitude and become more internationally competitive. This means people-skills/soft-skills for relations building and marketing - not just being the best technologically. More than 50% of the population in The America's speaks Iberian, not English.
Shouldn't be too hard. NM seems to manage 2 and even 3 languages just fine. You may even find that learning Spanish is a heck of a lot easier than learning English.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2015, 03:23 PM
 
Location: River North, Chicago, Illinois
4,460 posts, read 6,573,833 times
Reputation: 5975
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Emphatically no. What kind of nation is it when you travel into the countryside and you can't speak the language.
There are a lot of countries like that, including parts of Canada and Mexico. Switzerland and Belgium are other examples, if you want high-income examples.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Umm, many, if not most Puerto Ricans in Puerto Rico are bilingual.
This is simply not true. Even in San Juan it's not true and it's certainly not true as you get outside of San Juan. Probably between 1/4 and 1/3, at best, are fluent in English.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2015, 08:18 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,680 posts, read 8,483,035 times
Reputation: 7034
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamba_boy View Post
I agree that most Americans could and should "learn Spanish", at least a working knowledge. It's not like English is so rare any mainlanders visiting the new 51st PR really would HAVE TO learn Spanish, but it sure wouldn't hurt them. I think if you had the USA being a bilingual country English/Spanish like Canada is English/French with both languages taught from Kindergarten-on, it would make all Americans much more competitive - not just for jobs in the Mexican border states, Florida, and Puerto Rico - but for Mexico, Central America, and South America for high-tech value-add jobs and marketing to those Spanish-speaking people. Also, you can add Spain in Europe and Equatorial Guinea in Africa. In addition, you'd have a great head-start to learning Portuguese (about 90% of vocabulary the same as Spanish - just learn the nasal pronounciation and a few new words) to handle the huge up-and-coming Brazil, Portugal, Angola, and Mozambique. We need to change our "Speak Amurikan in Amurika" yokel attitude and become more internationally competitive. This means people-skills/soft-skills for relations building and marketing - not just being the best technologically. More than 50% of the population in The America's speaks Iberian, not English.
^ this

Ive often brought up the Netherlands as an example where Dutch, English, and Papiamento (Antillean Creole spoken in the Dutch Caribbean ABC/BES islands), and West Frisian are official languages. Students in the European portion of the Netherlands learn Dutch, English, and West Frisian, students in the Caribbean portion of the Netherlands learn Dutch, English, and Papiamento.

We need to move beyond "Dis iz Merika ... English Only" mentality.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2015, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,637,492 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by kehkou View Post
Shouldn't be too hard. NM seems to manage 2 and even 3 languages just fine. You may even find that learning Spanish is a heck of a lot easier than learning English.
I don't know about that. I do terrible with the genders... who decided the word "shower" was "feminine"? Only a couple other languages in the world don't use the genders, one of those is English and the other one is Korean (maybe another main language too... I'm not sure). While a language like French uses un and une we use one... it's called "the". So simple.

Though English has a lot of inconsistencies. Like plural for goose is geese, yet plural for moose is moose, not meese.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2015, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,188 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
I don't know about that. I do terrible with the genders... who decided the word "shower" was "feminine"? Only a couple other languages in the world don't use the genders, one of those is English and the other one is Korean (maybe another main language too... I'm not sure). While a language like French uses un and une we use one... it's called "the". So simple.

Though English has a lot of inconsistencies. Like plural for goose is geese, yet plural for moose is moose, not meese.
There is also the grammer and SVO ordering, not to mention diphthongs (something most latin languages lack completely).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2015, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
988 posts, read 491,270 times
Reputation: 1112
Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
I don't know about that. I do terrible with the genders... who decided the word "shower" was "feminine"? Only a couple other languages in the world don't use the genders, one of those is English and the other one is Korean (maybe another main language too... I'm not sure). While a language like French uses un and une we use one... it's called "the". So simple.

Though English has a lot of inconsistencies. Like plural for goose is geese, yet plural for moose is moose, not meese.
Genders have the potential to be more precise.

Dinosaur is masculine and whale is feminine in Spanish, so you can tell somebody that you saw a dinosaur and a whale at the museum and that she was bigger, and it should be clear that the whale was bigger. I would guess that that kind of clear unambiguous communication is why genders are such a common feature in languages. In English, we're always repeating nouns or playing games with pronouns to make our meaning clear.

The problem, as you've noted, is that non-native speakers forget or mess up genders (I've done it millions of times myself!) and since the native speaker determines what you're talking about based on gender, the whole thing can end up in a train wreck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2015, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,012 posts, read 639,839 times
Reputation: 2035
Absolutely not.

Puerto Rico is a third-world "banana republic" with high crime, lots of poverty, extremely corrupt politics and an overall culture that is completely dissimilar from that of the United States. The vast majority of people in Puerto are uneducated, don't speak a word of English and have no desire to learn English or adopt/embrace American culture, customs and traditions.

In all honesty, the US has more in common with Hong Kong than it does with Puerto Rico.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2015, 08:50 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,661 posts, read 28,685,250 times
Reputation: 43674
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Would you Americans want to add the Netherlands as a state to your great country?
Just tired of visa rules, high COL and i want English as my first language.
I enjoy visiting the Netherlands, but I didn't get any impression that any of the local residents were interested in joining the USA.

A different situation in Scotland at that time when the Scots were very opposed to joining the European Union and were wondering if they could survive economically if they turned away from Europe and joined the USA economically. Although not any interest in becoming a state. Scots generally aren't all that happy being part of the UK, let alone have any interest in being swallowed by the USA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2015, 09:17 PM
 
512 posts, read 376,779 times
Reputation: 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Would you Americans want to add the Netherlands as a state to your great country?
Just tired of visa rules, high COL and i want English as my first language.
Well politically I wouldn't ask another country to become a part of the US. However what I would do is simply make a treaty much like the EU with the Netherlands - open immigration & free trade. Come over if you like! You can stay!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top