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Old 11-28-2015, 03:45 PM
 
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The most obvious to me seems to be Regina vs. Saskatoon in Saskatchewan. Very similar size, similar demographics, similar voting patterns (in contrast Calgary and Edmonton in neighboring Alberta have much more of a defined white collar/blue collar split).

Dallas and Houston seems to be another. It's often said that Dallas is more "white collar" and Houston more "blue collar" - but I've never seen numbers that bear this out.

Maybe also Buffalo and Rochester to some degree?

There's also even said to be quite the Minneapolis-St. Paul rivalry (Minneapolis is perceived to be more Scandinavian, modern and white collar, St. Paul older, more Catholic and blue collar) - but they're obviously going to be pretty similar given that they're right next to each other!

Last edited by King of Kensington; 11-28-2015 at 03:54 PM..
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Old 11-28-2015, 03:53 PM
 
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I wouldn't say Dallas is more white collar and Houston is more blue collar. I think both cities have a high white collar population. But Houston is more blue collar then Dallas, mostly because there's more plants and factories. But both are much more white collar than blue collar.

I also don't agree Minneapolis is more white collar than St Paul to be honest.
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Old 11-28-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
The most obvious to me seems to be Regina vs. Saskatoon in Saskatchewan. Very similar size, similar demographics, similar voting patterns (in contrast Calgary and Edmonton in neighboring Alberta have much more of a defined white collar/blue collar split).

Dallas and Houston seems to be another. It's often said that Dallas is more "white collar" and Houston more "blue collar" - but I've never seen numbers that bear this out.

Maybe also Buffalo and Rochester to some degree?

There's also even said to be quite the Minneapolis-St. Paul rivalry (Minneapolis more Scandinavian, modern and white collar, St. Paul older, more Catholic and blue collar) - but they're obviously going to be pretty similar given that they're right next to each other!
Buffalo and Rochester are extremely similar but I don't see their rivalry as fierce.

Minneapolis and Saint Paul have similarities and differences, but I disagree with your assessment. Both are equally Scandinavian (which people who live there tend to exaggerate; like most of the Midwest it's more German than anything else). Northeast Minneapolis is more blue collar than anywhere in Saint Paul. Likewise, Summit Avenue in St. Paul is the epitome of old money. Saint Paul has a larger Hmong community than Minneapolis, but Minneapolis has a larger Vietnamese community. There are large Somali and Mexican communities in both (both are bigger in Minneapolis, though). There are lots of college kids in both.

I'd say that St. Paul reminds me more of a Great Lakes city, akin to Milwaukee or Grand Rapids.

Minneapolis is more like a less yuppified Seattle or a more cosmopolitan Kansas City. Minneapolis is a lot like Denver, but more gutterpunk and less grunge; more artsy and less outdoorsy.

Last edited by Dawn.Davenport; 11-28-2015 at 04:06 PM..
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Old 11-28-2015, 04:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Buffalo and Rochester are extremely similar but I don't see their rivalry as fierce.

Minneapolis and Saint Paul have similarities and differences, but I disagree with your assessment. Both are equally Scandinavian (which people who live there tend to exaggerate; like most of the Midwest it's more German than anything else). Northeast Minneapolis is more blue collar than anywhere in Saint Paul. Likewise, Summit Avenue in St. Paul is the epitome of old money. Saint Paul has a larger Hmong community than Minneapolis, but Minneapolis has a larger Vietnamese community. There are large Somali and Mexican communities in both (both are bigger in Minneapolis, though). There are lots of college kids in both.

I'd say that St. Paul reminds me more of a Great Lakes city, akin to Milwaukee or Grand Rapids.

Minneapolis is more like a less yuppified Seattle or a more cosmopolitan Kansas City. Minneapolis is a lot like Denver, but more gutterpunk and less grunge; more artsy and less outdoorsy.
I don't question that (I'm talking about perceived differences) but I thought that was the impression historically.
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Old 11-28-2015, 05:32 PM
 
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See this book for example:

Claiming the City, Politics, Faith, and the Power of Place in St. Paul
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Old 11-28-2015, 06:04 PM
 
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Does it have to be fierce? There's somewhat of a rivalry between Portland OR and Seattle WA, but it's pretty casual as far as rivalry go. Basically, Seattle presents itself as a 'real city' (for both better and worse) while Portland presents itself as smaller and more livable. Realistically -esp over the past several years- both cities have become pretty similar. Portland is getting to be almost as crowded and expensive as Seattle, so any rivalry seems pretty moot now.
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Old 11-28-2015, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Mountain Time Zone
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Seattle,Denver,and Portland are compared constantly and Seattle and Denver are very similar in size and political view.
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Old 11-28-2015, 06:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Buffalo and Rochester are extremely similar but I don't see their rivalry as fierce.

Minneapolis and Saint Paul have similarities and differences, but I disagree with your assessment. Both are equally Scandinavian (which people who live there tend to exaggerate; like most of the Midwest it's more German than anything else). Northeast Minneapolis is more blue collar than anywhere in Saint Paul. Likewise, Summit Avenue in St. Paul is the epitome of old money. Saint Paul has a larger Hmong community than Minneapolis, but Minneapolis has a larger Vietnamese community. There are large Somali and Mexican communities in both (both are bigger in Minneapolis, though). There are lots of college kids in both.

I'd say that St. Paul reminds me more of a Great Lakes city, akin to Milwaukee or Grand Rapids.

Minneapolis is more like a less yuppified Seattle or a more cosmopolitan Kansas City. Minneapolis is a lot like Denver, but more gutterpunk and less grunge; more artsy and less outdoorsy.
Buffalo is more blue collar, whereas Rochester is more white collar. Rochester has a higher educational attainment, which is around 22nd out of the top 100 metro areas too. Rochester appears to be more integrated outside of its city limits in comparison as well. Besides that, they are pretty similar.
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Old 11-28-2015, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Buffalo is more blue collar, whereas Rochester is more white collar. Rochester has a higher educational attainment, which is around 22nd out of the top 100 metro areas too. Rochester appears to be more integrated outside of its city limits in comparison as well. Besides that, they are pretty similar.
I agree with this. In addition, all the grain silos on Lake Erie add to Buffalo's blue-collar feel. Buffalo's downtown is both more architecturally interesting than downtown Rochester but not as vibrant. However, I feel that the Allentown and Elmwood Village neighborhoods in Buffalo seem larger and more vibrant and interesting than South Wedge and Park Ave neighborhoods in Rochester.

Despite these differences, I still don't know if there are any two cities more similar than Buffalo and Rochester. Tucson and Albuquerque; Bakersfield and Fresno; Omaha and Des Moines; Cleveland and Milwaukee; New Haven and Providence?

Last edited by Dawn.Davenport; 11-28-2015 at 09:40 PM..
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Old 11-28-2015, 10:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
I agree with this. In addition, all the grain silos on Lake Erie add to Buffalo's blue-collar feel. Buffalo's downtown is both more architecturally interesting than downtown Rochester but not as vibrant. However, I feel that the Allentown and Elmwood Village neighborhoods in Buffalo seem larger and more vibrant and interesting than South Wedge and Park Ave neighborhoods in Rochester.

Despite these differences, I still don't know if there are any two cities more similar than Buffalo and Rochester. Tucson and Albuquerque; Bakersfield and Fresno; Omaha and Des Moines; Cleveland and Milwaukee; New Haven and Providence?
There's not (at all), a rivalry between Milwaukee and Cleveland.
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