U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-28-2016, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Shelton, CT
5 posts, read 2,207 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYooper View Post
If youíre interested, there are places in the Midwest where the cost of living is lower and real estate is much cheaper, with as much opportunity for those with the self-employment mind set. These places have the lower population youíre looking for too. They also have much less stringent rules about what a person can do with their own land.

There are places where a person can get a small piece of land, sometimes with a small house on owner financing, some of which donít require a credit check. There are ways to end up with your own small (in some cases, really small) house on your own lot with only 2-3K up front and payments of $300-$700/month, at a final total cost of 10-20K.

I also know of a few low-cost housing options out west too.

If you want to know more, lets take this to direct messaging. I donít want to post the results of my research to the general forum.
Definitely! I would be happy to chat, and appreciate all the time that you're taking to advise me.



Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Why is anyone suggesting Oregon from a cost standpoint? Western Oregon costs and Western Washington costs are about the same. Eastern Oregon can be cheaper than Eastern Washington, in places.

Once you get out of the big city corridors, job opportunities are about the same, which is to say: not great.

Unlike the east coast, there are big stretches of relatively sparsely populated land out here. Outside of the cities, making a living as a musicians is not likely (and it isn't all that likely IN the cities, either).

Oregon has very strong land use planning requirements and things like septic and water require serious permits - you can't just build a tiny shack and use the great outdoors as your bathroom.

Sparse land is what I want, or, as close to it as possible. Think outskirts of a small and quiet town just under the size of a suburb, basically.

I don't plan on making my full living at music- was only playing semi-pro before for this same reason. Teaching lessons and taking side-jobs totally outside the profession is something that I've done before, and am prepared to do again. That's just reality these days.

No, I don't intend to break environmental laws- in fact, escaping rampant pollution is yet another big thing drawing me away from my home state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-28-2016, 06:03 PM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,297 posts, read 15,350,510 times
Reputation: 9468
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodbyeCT View Post
Sparse land is what I want, or, as close to it as possible. Think outskirts of a small and quiet town just under the size of a suburb, basically.

No, I don't intend to break environmental laws- in fact, escaping rampant pollution is yet another big thing drawing me away from my home state.
In Oregon, at any rate, you have the "population belt" from our largest city, Portland, south to Eugene (collectively all are in the Willamette Valley). Something like 85+% of the people in the state live in that relatively small I-5 corridor.

Take a look at the cities listed here:
http://www.city-data.com/city/Oregon.html

anything over about 80,000 is in the Portland area or is one of the other Willamette Valley cities. After that, cities start getting small in a hurry, with large distances between cities.

In general, the Oregon climates are:

Coastal: rainy, damp windy, between 70-95" of rain, more on the headlands. A 300+ mile long narrow chain of tiny cities, far apart, cut off from the interior valleys by a mountain range. Two main industries, tourism and retirees.

Willamette Valley: Portland to Eugene: also rainy and cool, around 45" of rain yearly, long cool winters and short but sunny and warm summers. A long wide valley, excellent for agriculture, surrounded by two large mountain chains. Expensive by Oregon standards. The job hub of Oregon where the major cities are located.

Southern Oregon: Shorter cool wet winters, long hot summers. A small long thin valley between the Coast Range, Cascades, Sisikiyous/Klamath mountains. Also expensive by Oregon standards.

Central Oregon: dry high desert, long cold winters, short warm summers. In the rain shadow of the Cascade Range, although not a lot sunnier than the Willamette Valley. Bend, Redmond, Sisters, Prineville are expensive by Oregon standards.

Eastern Oregon: very dry, very dusty scrub, cold winters, short warm-to-hot summers. Sunnier than Western Oregon but not exactly "sunny" by most standards.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2016, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Shelton, CT
5 posts, read 2,207 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
In Oregon, at any rate, you have the "population belt" from our largest city, Portland, south to Eugene (collectively all are in the Willamette Valley). Something like 85+% of the people in the state live in that relatively small I-5 corridor.

Take a look at the cities listed here:
http://www.city-data.com/city/Oregon.html

anything over about 80,000 is in the Portland area or is one of the other Willamette Valley cities. After that, cities start getting small in a hurry, with large distances between cities.

In general, the Oregon climates are:

Coastal: rainy, damp windy, between 70-95" of rain, more on the headlands. A 300+ mile long narrow chain of tiny cities, far apart, cut off from the interior valleys by a mountain range. Two main industries, tourism and retirees.

Willamette Valley: Portland to Eugene: also rainy and cool, around 45" of rain yearly, long cool winters and short but sunny and warm summers. A long wide valley, excellent for agriculture, surrounded by two large mountain chains. Expensive by Oregon standards. The job hub of Oregon where the major cities are located.

Southern Oregon: Shorter cool wet winters, long hot summers. A small long thin valley between the Coast Range, Cascades, Sisikiyous/Klamath mountains. Also expensive by Oregon standards.

Central Oregon: dry high desert, long cold winters, short warm summers. In the rain shadow of the Cascade Range, although not a lot sunnier than the Willamette Valley. Bend, Redmond, Sisters, Prineville are expensive by Oregon standards.

Eastern Oregon: very dry, very dusty scrub, cold winters, short warm-to-hot summers. Sunnier than Western Oregon but not exactly "sunny" by most standards.


Excellent advice- Thanks!

Edit: Do you have any info on Astoria that I might want to consider? I'm looking into it on my own, but thought that maybe you knew some specifics that I wouldn't find elsewhere.

Last edited by GoodbyeCT; 03-28-2016 at 06:16 PM.. Reason: forgot a question
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2016, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,094 posts, read 22,960,701 times
Reputation: 35240
May I ask what your moving plan is? If you have no income now, and very little savings, I don't know what you can do other than live in your car. Do you have a vehicle? One you can sleep in?

Starting a business takes time. Do you have enough savings to buy gas to get you to wherever? To survive on until you have income? Are you willing to be homeless? Go to foodbanks? Figure out where to camp or park? If so, you better consider the weather.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2016, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Shelton, CT
5 posts, read 2,207 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
May I ask what your moving plan is? If you have no income now, and very little savings, I don't know what you can do other than live in your car. Do you have a vehicle? One you can sleep in?

Starting a business takes time. Do you have enough savings to buy gas to get you to wherever? To survive on until you have income? Are you willing to be homeless? Go to foodbanks? Figure out where to camp or park? If so, you better consider the weather.

No, I don't intend to be homeless or to live in a car. I would rent out a single room or some other affordable living space, share a trailer, or something like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2016, 09:43 PM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,297 posts, read 15,350,510 times
Reputation: 9468
When I lived in Portland, Astoria was my favorite place on the coast. To visit, that is, it is far too rainy and cloudy for me to live in year-round. I think that stats for Astoria are between 70-80" of rain a year and about 110 days of sun. On the other hand, there aren't many hot days or freezing days, either, so it's temperate. Good for cool-weather crops, a disaster for anything that wants summer warmth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Bit north of Seattle
50 posts, read 40,329 times
Reputation: 47
Sorry I’ve taken so long to get back to you. I was going to list some places where you could get set up with a house for cheap, but it sounds like you aren’t at that place yet.

First off, here's something that seems tailor made for you: https://olympic.craigslist.org/roo/5487255594.html

Now, if that's not right, are you willing to consider working a job for a while to get a start or or do you want to go straight into your business? If you are, I would suggest googling the best cities for a job in 2016 and pick the one that appeals the most to you. Live inexpensively while saving up for a year or two, and them get something affordable.

There are places in the U.S. where a person can get a small acreage with a cabin or mobile home (not run down, either) for $20 - $30k - owner finance. If you want to go really cheap, sometimes you can buy a lot set up for an RV starting at $5K.

Now, for Oregon: Room for rent prices are affordable in the south Willamette Valley and there are quite a few jobs available this time of the year throughout the summer that pay from $12,000 - $16,000/month. Also, room rental prices will go down in late May - June in Eugene. 1br apartments can be found @ $450 - $550, but those go fast, of course. Meanwhile you could work at starting your business up. There are lots of nice little towns in that area and Oregon has laws that stop most urban sprawl, so it’s easy to get out of town and into the country.

Check craigslist rooms section. put things like “exchange” or “work” in the search bar and check the include nearby areas box you will find people willing to trade a room and free utilities for handyman skills, yard work, or whatever. Here’s an example, though it's not in Oregon: https://pullman.craigslist.org/roo/5474889393.html

If you decide you really like Oregon, the southern part of the Willamette Valley is a good choice this time of year, with it’s many entry-level manufacturing jobs and large amount of agricultural/food processing jobs coming up. That area is relatively rural and pretty. It’s also close to lots of recreation.

Southern Oregon has a few smallish towns along the I-5 corridor that could be good for starting some sort of business selling things to the tourists. The cost of living is relatively low there, and the scenery is fantastic. Lots of recreation opportunities, or course.

Many organic farms are going to need workers soon and some jobs come with room and board too. WWOOF is a good place to find positions in Oregon and around the rest of the U.S. Some are set up so that the workers have their own trailer or cabin, and some are out in the boonies. It’s a good idea to google a farm before starting. Most are great, but a few try to take advantage of their workers, same as anywhere.

As far as I know, Astoria has a pretty stagnant economy. You would have to come up with an affordable place to live, but if you did, you should eventually be able to make the self-employed lifestyle work - that is if you are able to survive your first year. Maybe you could come up with something to sell to the tourists, but really, most of them go further south. If you want to live on the coast, Florence could be a better choice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top