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Old 03-29-2016, 05:20 AM
 
7,693 posts, read 4,551,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
Jacksonville's city population is an anomaly of it being coterminous with it's county. It's "vibrancy and street level activity" are right in line for an MSA of 1.4million people, which is a FAR better way of gauging city size. I'm not sure JAX really qualifies as a "big" city for this discussion, city population is well known as the worst possible metric for sizing up a city come on now.
I find this POV incredibly suburb centric. As someone who spent his entire life in cities, I can't tell you how little impact the outlying metro area has had in shaping my urban experience. Metro may matter for Sunbelt cities, but legacy cities thrive on the population density of their urban core, and not the fact that 1 million people live within a 45 minute drive. Every city that people say out punches it's class, happens to be dense and urban. In these cases it is always the city, and not the metro that matters.
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Old 03-29-2016, 05:34 AM
 
608 posts, read 434,721 times
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For 2.4 M people, i think San Antonio is very laid back
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Old 03-29-2016, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
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Most cities seem slow paced to me outside of the Northeast. I was in Tampa last week (from Pittsburgh), and the paced seemed much slower even though they are similarly sized.
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Old 03-29-2016, 06:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I find this POV incredibly suburb centric. As someone who spent his entire life in cities, I can't tell you how little impact the outlying metro area has had in shaping my urban experience. Metro may matter for Sunbelt cities, but legacy cities thrive on the population density of their urban core, and not the fact that 1 million people live within a 45 minute drive. Every city that people say out punches it's class, happens to be dense and urban. In these cases it is always the city, and not the metro that matters.
His point was that Jacksonville's city limits are extremely generous as it is a consolidated city so you can't really use municipal population as an appropriate gauge for its real size here; the metro population figure is a better standard to use within this context and as such, it's really not a "big city."
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Old 03-29-2016, 06:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
His point was that Jacksonville's city limits are extremely generous as it is a consolidated city so you can't really use municipal population as an appropriate gauge for its real size here; the metro population figure is a better standard to use within this context and as such, it's really not a "big city."
Then " Jacksonville doesn't have a real city density" would be more apt than "metro is more meaningful than city".
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Old 03-29-2016, 06:36 AM
 
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Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Then " Jacksonville doesn't have a real city density" would be more apt than "metro is more meaningful than city".
Well there are small/midsized cities with high densities also, so that wouldn't really be any more apt.
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Old 03-29-2016, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschlick84 View Post
Would Denver be considered slow pace, or not? From my observation, people here are always in a hurry for no apparent reason.
Yes Denver is slower paced. I've had two different jobs where the boss has told me "just be at your desk by 9 and don't leave earlier than 4." If you try that in Dallas you'll likely miss meetings, get the stink eye from your boss, and possibly get fired.
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Old 03-29-2016, 07:04 AM
 
3,952 posts, read 3,487,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Then " Jacksonville doesn't have a real city density" would be more apt than "metro is more meaningful than city".
If you expand any city to almost 800 sq mi you're going to dilude density from the core. If Jacksonville were 70 sq mi people would view it differently, it would have "real city density", and the only thing that would change is city boundaries. Regardless of a suburb/urban POV, it looks and feels like the anchor of a 1.4 million person metro area.
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Old 03-29-2016, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,311,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
If you expand any city to almost 800 sq mi you're going to dilude density from the core. If Jacksonville were 70 sq mi people would view it differently, it would have "real city density", and the only thing that would change is city boundaries. Regardless of a suburb/urban POV, it looks and feels like the anchor of a 1.4 million person metro area.
Curious what its population density would be at 70 sq. mi....
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Old 03-29-2016, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,795,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
If you expand any city to almost 800 sq mi you're going to dilude density from the core. If Jacksonville were 70 sq mi people would view it differently, it would have "real city density", and the only thing that would change is city boundaries. Regardless of a suburb/urban POV, it looks and feels like the anchor of a 1.4 million person metro area.
I'm not familiar with JAX, but it seems your impressions would be testable by considering how the core of JAX compares with that of similarly populated MSAs: Providence, Milwaukee, OKC and Memphis.
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