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Old 03-29-2016, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Born & Raised DC > Carolinas > Seattle > Denver
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Denver. Over 3 million people here, yet it feels NOTHING like the hustle and bustle of an east coast city.
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Old 03-29-2016, 09:04 AM
 
3,952 posts, read 3,487,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I'm not familiar with JAX, but it seems your impressions would be testable by considering how the core of JAX compares with that of similarly populated MSAs: Providence, Milwaukee, OKC and Memphis.

Milwaukee and Memphis are old major cities that developed during the industrial revolution. Their cores were developed when they were a tier or two higher from a population standpoint. Having been to OKC it is on par with Jacksonville, JAX may have an advantage over it because of it's ocean proximity. It also feels similar to Louisville, and is equivalent to the Hampton Roads cities, which are also similar in metro size. Is Providence truly a metro of 1.6 million people? Or does it benefit from population overflow by being so close to Boston and having somewhat blurred divisions between the two metros?
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Old 03-29-2016, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
Milwaukee and Memphis are old major cities that developed during the industrial revolution. Their cores were developed when they were a tier or two higher from a population standpoint. Having been to OKC it is on par with Jacksonville, JAX may have an advantage over it because of it's ocean proximity. It also feels similar to Louisville, and is equivalent to the Hampton Roads cities, which are also similar in metro size. Is Providence truly a metro of 1.6 million people? Or does it benefit from population overflow by being so close to Boston and having somewhat blurred divisions between the two metros?
With all respect, the matter of JAXs urbanity seems like a moving target for you. You seem pretty tied to your views, so perhaps you don't realize this.

FWIW, Hampton Roads consists of 6 unique and different municipalities, each with their own governance, infrastructure, services, and history.

Last edited by mjlo; 03-29-2016 at 10:15 AM..
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Old 03-29-2016, 10:16 AM
 
3,952 posts, read 3,487,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
With all respect, the matter of JAXs urbanity seems like a moving target for you. You seem pretty tied to your views, so perhaps you don't realize this.

FWIW, Hampton Roads consists of 6 unique and different municipalities, each with their own governance, infrastructure, services, and history.
I must be communicating my point wrong. I'm not arguing for or against Jacksonville's level of urbanity. It is as urban it's counterparts that have emerged in the auto-centric era of infrastructure. It is LESS urban than it's counterparts that emerged before. It is not a standout as more suburban than other sunbelt cities. That's not to say it isn't below it's potential as a city. I am simply saying the city is representative of a metro area with 1.4 million people. It not more quiet than it should be, or punching under its weight. It's right where it feels like it would be for as many people live in it's MSA.
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Old 03-29-2016, 10:29 AM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,333,728 times
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Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
FWIW, Hampton Roads consists of 6 unique and different municipalities, each with their own governance, infrastructure, services, and history.
Seven actually, plus the Historic Triangle.
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Old 03-29-2016, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Center City
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^^^ i kinda get what you're saying, but the topic is to consider which cities are slower paced - not for their metro size or developmental history.

JAX is probably one of the least known large cities in the US. I suspect that's why many of us who are pushing back on your posts are just struggling to understand.
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Old 03-29-2016, 10:46 AM
 
3,952 posts, read 3,487,388 times
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Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
^^^ i kinda get what you're saying, but the topic is to consider which cities are slower paced - not for their metro size or developmental history.

JAX is probably one of the least known large cities in the US. I suspect that's why many of us who are pushing back on your posts are just struggling to understand.


I understand, what I was trying to say is that Jacksonville is NOT a large city. It is a mid-sized city that covers an unrealistic land area, which makes it seem like it's larger than it is on paper. If Grand Rapids Michigan covered 800sq mi it would have 700,000 people and cause the same argument. If Miami or Detroit Covered 800 sq miles they would have over 2million people each. Philly would have over 3million people. City borders are arbitrary, limited by state laws, and can skew a perception of how big a city actually is.
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Old 03-29-2016, 10:48 AM
 
56,515 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Originally Posted by illinois_nc23 View Post
I enjoy big city amenities (concerts, museums, pro sports, huge festivals) but hate the stressful, fast-paced, work-your-life-away lifestyle of most large cities. I only work because it's a necessity in life. I don't care about having a fancy job and making 6 figures. Are there any bigger cities in the U.S. That have a more laid back vibe with a good work life balance?
Given some of the criteria in the original post, would cities/areas like Salt Lake City, Buffalo and Raleigh be up for consideration, as they have all of these things?
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Old 03-29-2016, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I understand, what I was trying to say is that Jacksonville is NOT a large city. It is a mid-sized city that covers an unrealistic land area, which makes it seem like it's larger than it is on paper. If Grand Rapids Michigan covered 800sq mi it would have 700,000 people and cause the same argument. If Miami or Detroit Covered 800 sq miles they would have over 2million people each. Philly would have over 3million people. City borders are arbitrary, limited by state laws, and can skew a perception of how big a city actually is.
^^^ I kinda get what you're saying, but the topic is to consider which cities are slower paced - not for their metro size or developmental history.

I've seen analogous arguments made by posters from other cities. For example, I've seen posters from Houston (a place I called home for many years) claim that the city would be more politically liberal if its corporite limits were smaller, much like a northeastern city. Similarly, I've seen posters from Philly (were I now live) claim the city would have a lower poverty rate if its corporate limits did not take in some of the farther flung ghettos. At the end of the day, cities are what they are, and can't represent themselves as anything else.
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Old 03-29-2016, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speagles84 View Post
Most cities seem slow paced to me outside of the Northeast. I was in Tampa last week (from Pittsburgh), and the paced seemed much slower even though they are similarly sized.
I still have no idea what "pace" means. Do people show up to work an hour late or something?
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