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Old 04-02-2016, 01:18 PM
 
2,199 posts, read 2,324,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeSides View Post
That said, you consider Baltimore and Washington DC to be one city.
That said, that was said.
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Old 04-02-2016, 01:26 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
That said, that was said.
I'd love to know how you came to the conclusion that Baltimore and DC are one city, when it's not even one metropolitan area.
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Old 04-02-2016, 05:32 PM
 
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San Diego, Phoenix, Dallas and San Antonio
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Old 04-02-2016, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,569 posts, read 3,716,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle4321 View Post
What about Seattle and Portland? I went up at visited Vancouver Canada, not Washington
and Vancouver felt crazy busy compared to the other 2. What cha guys think?
Yes, but only because Vancouver, BC has a much denser residential feel, and has for several decades. It also attracts many more Asians who are used to dense cities. I would say Seattle is slowly catching up, however.
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Old 04-03-2016, 08:46 AM
 
1,112 posts, read 697,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I'd love to know how you came to the conclusion that Baltimore and DC are one city, when it's not even one metropolitan area.
Maybe she's never been to the east coast. I think 7 cities and RVA are the same city.
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Old 04-03-2016, 09:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I'd love to know how you came to the conclusion that Baltimore and DC are one city, when it's not even one metropolitan area.
Why? Your mind is made up, and so is mine. I consider them part of one metro or "city", the same why I consider L.A. and the I.E. part of the same "city" even though they are different census designated metros...and you do not, but neither of us is going to be convinced, so why bother.

Either way, Baltimashington isn't slow paced.
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Old 04-03-2016, 09:24 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,749 posts, read 6,158,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
Why? Your mind is made up, and so is mine. I consider them part of one metro or "city", the same why I consider L.A. and the I.E. part of the same "city" even though they are different census designated metros...and you do not, but neither of us is going to be convinced, so why bother.

Either way, Baltimashington isn't slow paced.

You're convinced that something that isn't true in the real world is true in your mind. That makes sense.
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Old 04-05-2016, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Parker, CO
1,086 posts, read 2,742,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VASpaceMan View Post
Okay, how are several of you guys not getting the pace thing, acting like it doesn't exist. Have you only ever lived in one place?

Let me frame it for you. I went from living from a city that is one extreme to the other. I went from living in Portland, OR, a good sized but super laid back city to Washington, DC a fast paced, type A workaholic northeastern city.

Portland. I worked for a innovative tech company where a bunch of smart, capable, highly educated, well paid people from all over the country worked, by no means slackers. The company in a very west coast, and Portland style had a workplace that exemplified the "spoil and make the workers happy to make them produce great things ethic." If employees were stupid enough to abuse any of this they were simply gotten rid of. They regularly served ice cream outside. There was an unlimited sick leave. Employees FLEW KITES and PLAYED FRIZBEE and went on leisurely nature walks at lunch time in full view of the building's glass windows. Imagine that in DC, New York, managers would have heart attacks. They would be on a firing frenzy. On Thursdays and Fridays almost everyone had kayaks, skiis, canoes, etc on top of their cars and left early. The entire time I lived there it felt like I was on vacation, even when I was at work. It was amazing. Work hours were extremely loose. They mainly cared that you got your work done, acted professionally and produced amazing things. You almost NEVER and I mean never heard car horns in the metro area. No one ever rammed up your behind in traffic. Northeasterns would say they drive like grandparents and I think they'd burst a blood vessel in this environment. Road rage didn't exist. Quality of life is extremely important. A true work-to-live culture (similar to Europe and Canada).

I moved to the DC area. This is one example of a typical work environment I've worked here, and the people I know all have comparable situations. My project manager was the stereotypical type A northeastern workaholic. She acted like she was constantly under an extreme amount of stress and used fear tactics to manipulate employees to work. Her stress was like a virus and spread to employees making them all seem like scared mice. I produced a lot of great work, but I acted very calm and even-keeled and it drove her up the wall. I'd learned from working at a lot of different places around the country that there was value in performing with grace under pressure. Getting things done without acting like you are having a nervous breakdown. To her (and other managers that I've worked for in the DC area) this translates that you are acting like "you don't have drive" or "passion" or some other such garbage. It doesn't matter that you are producing great things. You have to act like the same neurotic, basketcase as them. The IT director and CEO of the company acted like everyone was constantly in trouble and they were itching to fire everyone. (As an aside, I've actually learned in well known leadership books that this is a sign of bad management, trying to manipulate people with fear, the great leaders actually inspire, lead by example, mentor and coach. Lead by confidence, patience and grace). In the few times that my scared, stressed out coworkers dared to eat lunch out, they'd cram down lunch like they were in a race. I was used to taking time and having a pleasant, social lunch. I had to get used to eating East Coast style, shoveling in food so fast that you don't taste it and racing back to work. In traffic, people are constantly up you a$$ honking their horns. No one lets anyone in, they actively rush up to block anyone else from getting in the space ahead of them. Road rage is something you see within 10 minutes of leaving your home, even if you're in the suburbs. I can time the first type A, aggressive a-hole behavior that begins the cumulative stress of the day as I leave the house with a stopwatch. In contrast to feeling like I was on constant vacation out west, in Northern Va / DC even on days off I feel like I'm at work.. and indeed many in the area crow about how they work extra hours, skip vacations, sacrifice family events to put in extra time for their sacred job. The fools actually brag about it. And when they are old, I'm sure they will be very proud of all the extra work they put in, that wasn't appreciated, and the time they missed time with their kids, wives and relatives. A true live-to-work culture. The crush of overpopulated humanity in the northeast megalopolis is palpable. There's a reason they call it the "rat race". It isn't made up. Give me a break.
My feelings exactly. People who don't notice a difference in pace probably haven't lived in many places. The big cities in the northeast in particular, has a very live-to-work culture. Status is king. Long work hours are celebrated. If you don't take vacation, that means that you're even that much more valuable to the company who honestly doesn't know you from a hole in the wall when it all comes down to it. Job title is your identity. What about the kid... just hire a nanny to put them to bed (if they're a really good nanny, they'll text you pictures that you can save and look at decades down the road when your children move away from home and barely know you).

Yes, there are cities that are fast paced and the above seems to be the norm in said cities.

Last edited by downtownnola; 04-05-2016 at 07:47 PM..
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Old 04-06-2016, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,446 posts, read 11,948,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by downtownnola View Post
My feelings exactly. People who don't notice a difference in pace probably haven't lived in many places. The big cities in the northeast in particular, has a very live-to-work culture. Status is king. Long work hours are celebrated. If you don't take vacation, that means that you're even that much more valuable to the company who honestly doesn't know you from a hole in the wall when it all comes down to it. Job title is your identity. What about the kid... just hire a nanny to put them to bed (if they're a really good nanny, they'll text you pictures that you can save and look at decades down the road when your children move away from home and barely know you).

Yes, there are cities that are fast paced and the above seems to be the norm in said cities.
This is the norm among only a certain subculture of upper-middle class professionals. Hell, I grew up in Fairfield County, Connecticut and none of my close friends were the study their butts off to get into Yale types. Many ended up going to pretty good colleges, but none of them were the sort of people who were particularly competitive at all. They were either slackers who were naturally smart enough to get all As and be in honors classes, or slackers who weren't.

Of course these sorts of people exist. My point though is that I've spent nearly my entire life living in the Northeast - ultimately ending up a professional with a graduate degree - and have had minimal contact with them.
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Old 04-06-2016, 07:19 AM
 
7,743 posts, read 4,584,665 times
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What's happening, is people are conflating the corporate culture of the city's largest industry with the city's "pace", which is utterly ridiculous, because the majority of people in any city do not work in those industries. Also it would be impossible to gauge the pace of a city and less you've worked there.

Basically, people are gauging cities based on their circle of transplant professionals.
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