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Old 04-01-2016, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63165

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
While I suppose Texas was part of the South historically, I never personally think of Texas as a Southern state, but I've heard Eastern Texas is fairly Southern, and that's the only part of Texas I haven't been to. The rest of Texas I have been to seems to have fairly general American culture, not much different then Western state, most of the Midwest, or Florida. Southern states, New England, NYC, Chicago, Boston, and a handful of other places have their own distinct cultures to various extents, but I don't think most of Texas falls into a Southern cultural category, just the border areas of the state on the East side.

Not sure what state you live in, but East Texas alone encompasses a larger area than many states do. It would take about seven hours to drive from Paris, Texas (northeast) to Port Lavaca (southeast) and about two hours from Terrell (western edge of East Texas) to Wascom (eastern edge). This is a very heavily populated area of Texas - and very southern culturally and historically.
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Old 04-01-2016, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,224,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
I would agree that Houston is a "southern" city, but Dallas is a hybrid of southern and great plains.

Southern Louisiana is considered southern by geography, climate, flora and fauna. Perhaps the Cajun and Creole makes it unique but no less southern as you don't find those types of people anywhere else but the south (in the US)
great plains isn't really considered a region. It's part Midwest in KS, NE, SD, and ND, and part South in OK and TX. Dallas is a Southern city culturally, linguistically, and demographically.
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Old 04-01-2016, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,837 posts, read 6,178,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
great plains isn't really considered a region. It's part Midwest in KS, NE, SD, and ND, and part South in OK and TX. Dallas is a Southern city culturally, linguistically, and demographically.
So you are in charge of Regions on CD. DFW is distinctive compared any other city considered "southern" because it is on the edge of the great plains and shares many elements of other areas of the great plains. Specifically, weather, terrain, and to a great degree a traditional economic base as other cities in the southern great plains.

Certainly, you are correct in your assessment but DFW is easily distinguishable from other southern cities due to it's location.
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Old 04-02-2016, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Miami, Floroda
650 posts, read 602,921 times
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To me, many parts of Texas aren't southern. Texas is well Texas. It doesn't have the traditional culture like let's say Arkansas. Texas is pretty diverse, progressive, growing, bbq, Cowboys. Texas fits in with the "Wild West" more than it would with other southern cities. Yes, many parts of Texas such as east Texas are very southern. But cities like Houston aren't similar to Nashville, Little Rock, etc. It doesn't have that southern culture.

South Louisiana/New Orleans has that culture. I don't think it's as southern as Mississippi or Nashville, but it still has that culture.

That's just my take on it.
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Old 04-03-2016, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63165
Houston (and all of East Texas) seems very southern in culture to me.

Among the "southern style" events held in the Houston area are:

MLKJ parade
Mardi Gras
World Championship BBQ Contest
Azalea Trail
Buffalo Bayou Regatta
Bayou City Art Festival
Carnival Houston Show and Parade
Juneteenth Celebration
Brazoria County Crawfish Festival
Texas Crawfish Festival
Bands on the Bayou
Gospel Music Concert
Armand Bayou Nature Center
Kemah Boardwalk
Old Town Spring
Houston Hotels, Events & Things to Do | Houston Vacations
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Old 04-03-2016, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,626 posts, read 27,037,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Houston (and all of East Texas) seems very southern in culture to me.

Among the "southern style" events held in the Houston area are:

MLKJ parade
Mardi Gras
World Championship BBQ Contest
Azalea Trail
Buffalo Bayou Regatta
Bayou City Art Festival
Carnival Houston Show and Parade
Juneteenth Celebration
Brazoria County Crawfish Festival
Texas Crawfish Festival
Bands on the Bayou
Gospel Music Concert
Armand Bayou Nature Center
Kemah Boardwalk
Old Town Spring
Houston Hotels, Events & Things to Do | Houston Vacations
A couple of those I wouldn't call Southern style but I get your point. Much of your list is really gulf Coast southern.
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Old 04-03-2016, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
A couple of those I wouldn't call Southern style but I get your point. Much of your list is really gulf Coast southern.

Right - Gulf Coast Southern is southern to the very core, just like Appalachian Southern and Chesapeake Bay Southern and Piedmont Southern and Low Country Southern and Delta Southern and....you get my drift!
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Old 04-05-2016, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,626 posts, read 27,037,620 times
Reputation: 9576
The whole of Texas though should be compared to Oklahoma. Only the area it borders. For instance, Trans-Pecos, South, and Southeast Texas isn't like Oklahoma in the slightest.
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Old 04-05-2016, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,052 posts, read 3,377,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
The whole of Texas though should be compared to Oklahoma. Only the area it borders. For instance, Trans-Pecos, South, and Southeast Texas isn't like Oklahoma in the slightest.
The bulk of the state is similar to Oklahoma. Far west Texas is like New Mexico, south Texas is more like Mexico and east Texas is more like Louisiana but the central bulk of the state, and the northern part including the panhandle is more like Oklahoma.

Dallas, Fort Worth, Abilene, Austin, San Angelo, all those cities and the surrounding areas are more like Oklahoma than any other state. The whole of Texas is far too large to be identical to a single state. It has the green forests like Louisiana and southwest Arkansas, the plains of Oklahoma, and the dry desert of New Mexico. It's where the south and southwest blend into a very unique state. Overall, it is very wide and open, akin to Oklahoma. Much of the state isn't very green besides spring time nor is it very forested until you get way further east.
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Old 04-05-2016, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,626 posts, read 27,037,620 times
Reputation: 9576
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The bulk of the state is similar to Oklahoma. Far west Texas is like New Mexico, south Texas is more like Mexico and east Texas is more like Louisiana but the central bulk of the state, and the northern part including the panhandle is more like Oklahoma.

Dallas, Fort Worth, Abilene, Austin, San Angelo, all those cities and the surrounding areas are more like Oklahoma than any other state. The whole of Texas is far too large to be identical to a single state. It has the green forests like Louisiana and southwest Arkansas, the plains of Oklahoma, and the dry desert of New Mexico. It's where the south and southwest blend into a very unique state. Overall, it is very wide and open, akin to Oklahoma. Much of the state isn't very green besides spring time nor is it very forested until you get way further east.
I'm sorry but I just do not agree that Austin is like Oklahoma. Maybe you are looking at this from a topography standpoint. I can see that, barely. Outside of that, Austin has virtually nothing in common with Oklahoma, demographically, socially, or politically. Dallas doesn't either. Now Fort Worth does.
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