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Old 09-23-2017, 07:05 PM
 
172 posts, read 91,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
There isn't a one Texas accent.
But aren't most of the accents minus the Hispanic accents at least a little southern sounding?
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,767 posts, read 36,172,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaszilla View Post
But aren't most of the accents minus the Hispanic accents at least a little southern sounding?
There tends to be a distinct Texas twang.

Also another thing that struck me immediately about Texas accents is the way words like "light," and "right" and "night" are drawn out...

"Turn out that laaaaaat. It's naaaaaaat time. Raaaaaat?"

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Old 09-24-2017, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Houston
201 posts, read 127,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceter View Post
Southern Louisiana is the only region within the Deep South where the white population has been for a long time, predominantly Catholic and of more diverse European heritage. In Texas, the white population was more reflective of the Deep South's as in predominantly protestant, and mostly of English and or Scotch-Irish heritage.
Simply not true. Read a Texas history book.
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Old 09-24-2017, 02:52 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,822 posts, read 12,328,370 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
As a Louisianian from the northern part of the state, every visit down South (south louisiana that is) is like being in a different world. The food is great, the people down South are great, but it is very different from the northern part of the state which is mainstream southern US. I haven't found anything to compare to it and I have travelled through all the deep South and eastern South and Florida and Texas as well. Where I live, I can relate better to Texas than anywhere else including Arkansas and Mississippi. Maybe it's the proximity but really all the culture stuff on CD doesn't mean that we are familiar with every state in the South. I did see some differences east of the Mississippi River such as better behaved people and the old southern manners and charm that is lacking so badly where I'm from.
I live near Baton Rouge and like this area a lot but I feel it lacks that traditional Southern graciousness you see in Savannah or Charleston SC. There is a definitely traditional Southern culture here (more so than New Orleans which is its own unique thing) but not as strong as I saw in the Carolinas, Virginia (excluding NOVA), Georgia, and Arkansas. When it comes to Southern hospitality Baton Rouge is friendlier than many places up north but I feel the difference isn't as great today as it was in the past. There is certainly no hospitality on the road compared to West Virginia and Kentucky and a lot of the younger generation is not raised right and actually doesn't have very good manners IMHO especially compared to the past though still better than many other parts of America.
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Old 09-24-2017, 04:39 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,687,151 times
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Genteel was the word I needed when I wrote that post. At least up north here, people just seem rough around the edges. Blank stares and no hello or hey. I don't know why.
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Old 09-24-2017, 08:54 PM
 
920 posts, read 1,016,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdz1979 View Post
Simply not true. Read a Texas history book.

Something that wouldn't be in a Texas history book that historical census figures would show, is that the white population in Louisiana was and still is, proportionately more White Ethnic/Catholic than the white population in Texas.
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Old 09-24-2017, 09:38 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,281,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceter View Post
Something that wouldn't be in a Texas history book that historical census figures would show, is that the white population in Louisiana was and still is, proportionately more White Ethnic/Catholic than the white population in Texas.
Yes, but the white ancestry of Texas (especially in the southern half of the state) isn't as homogeneous as in the Deep South either.
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Old 09-25-2017, 12:53 AM
 
920 posts, read 1,016,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Yes, but the white ancestry of Texas (especially in the southern half of the state) isn't as homogeneous as in the Deep South either.
True, but what separates southern Texas from the rest of the Deep South most is it's historically strong Mexican flavor.
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Old 09-25-2017, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,386,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
I always get a chuckle out of Texans as they try to distance themselves from Oklahoma. This is particularly true of their north Texas mecca of wonderful mighty Dallas. Obviously Dallas is much larger than OKC and it's "liberalism" is wildly overstated other than the fact that Dallas is more ethnic than OKC. The core of OKC is somewhat liberal as is Dallas (on the north side of the river in both cities).

I've been going to Dallas since about 1965 and it's never felt it was THAT different than Oklahoma City. Just much bigger with more fancy stuff. Certainly it is the core city of the Southern plains and northeastern Texas/SW Oklahoma and even into Louisiana.

Texans, by their nature and upbringing tend to look for the differences when they leave Texas as opposed to the similarities of another state or city.
Lol its the same with Minnesota and Wisconsin, difference being though both states are similar population and have a similar amount of large cities. Minnesotans like to think of themselves as being better than "dose dere cheeseheads!" but deep down, we're very similar states. I prefer MN but its not like WI is practically Pluto!
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Old 09-25-2017, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,386,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
When I'm in Texas I see a lot more Texan pride than Southern pride. A lot more Lone Star flags than Confederate flags and people rarely talk about taking pride in the war etc etc. A lot more people in Louisiana are rooted in this kind of history, heck I know more people in West Virginia who are into Confederate history and had ancestors fight in the war than Texans. East Texas is the South I'll say that much but definitely not El Paso, the Rio Grande Valley, San Antonio and I'd say the Panhandle is maybe borderline southern and Midwestern with a lot of similarities to Oklahoma.

The wide open spaces and desert landscape and arid climate in West Texas is not characteristic of the South. Also the predominant Mexican culture is distinctly non-Southern. Cajun food has a lot more in common with traditional Southern cooking than Mexican food does. New Orleans itself does have things that stand out from the rest of the south, especially its significant Irish and Italian immigration the same time that happened in the Northeast, and its density and urban neighborhoods vs the more suburban nature of most Southern cities but New Orleans is only one small part of Louisiana and even within the city there are places like the Garden District that are VERY traditionally Southern. Louisiana also has a large number of historic plantations which Texas is not associated with.

Texas is too big to classify into one region I would say El Paso is definitely Southwest (though some argue culturally it is not American at all as the city is almost entirely immigrants who practice Mexican culture) while Texarkana is definitely Southern. Laredo is also hardly American at all and has an authentic Mexican culture due to immigration, no different than the other side of the border. Laredo and El Paso are some of the few places in the US where the vast majority of people do not speak English as their primary language, Miami is another such place. I've always thought of the entire border area as an extension of Mexico due to immigration.

Dallas's culture is heavily diluted by northern transplants and immigrants but its core native culture is southern. Houston's native culture is also Southern even though it too has been heavily diluted by outsiders moving in which in a way makes it similar to Charlotte and Atlanta which are facing the same trends.
I do agree about the fact you don't see many confederate flags, but I still do see a strong southern pride and southern identity. They just distance themselves from the flag more than other states (and thank God). I always see a lot more confederate flags in FL especially northern FL.

I don't see Dallas' culture as being all that "diluted" by transplants or immigrants, though. In Texas in general, many transplants (and immigrants) really absorb the Texas way of life. I had a Chinese immigrant teacher, super strong Chinese accent, but she said "y'all." One of my bosses down there is Chilean, strong Chilean accent, but she says "fixing to" lol. Many northern transplants I've met in DFW use southern/Texan colloquialisms. I'm talking people from Illinois, Ohio or Nebraska. One of my friend's boss from work is from Minnesota, and I asked her if he has a Minnesota accent, she said "No. He got a country ass southern accent." and he came down in his 20s, not as a kid lol. I don't feel northerners influence Dallas or DFW in general all that much. There's nothing that feels northern there. At the most, it kinda feels like Kansas City but like you said, its Texas at its core. There's nothing "yankee" about Dallas. Minneapolis and Saint Paul though? Super northern. Nasal accents and all!
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