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Old 03-30-2016, 12:11 PM
 
7,698 posts, read 4,554,568 times
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I think San Antonio pleasantly surprises people, the first time they see the Riverwalk. Outside of the Riverwalk, the city is less impressive, and the Riverwalk itself becomes far less appealing on subsequent visits.

On the other hand, I don't think Baltimore's inner harbor is very impressive, but when you delve deeper you find the city has a lot of cool neighborhoods, and a lot of character.
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Old 03-30-2016, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,225,310 times
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Shows charms: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Oakland, Cincinnati, Louisville, Chicago, Sacramento, Washington DC

Lose charms: San Francisco (again), Louisville (again), San Diego, Austin, San Antonio, Vancouver BC (I LOVE Vancouver, but I wouldn't call it "charming")
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Old 03-30-2016, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,825,168 times
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Every city has a new reality. This hipster millennial revitalization fad has been a bust. There will be only a couple idyllic neighborhoods while the rest of the city is a dump.
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Old 03-31-2016, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Clifton, Cincinnati
114 posts, read 80,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Every city has a new reality. This hipster millennial revitalization fad has been a bust. There will be only a couple idyllic neighborhoods while the rest of the city is a dump.
Not entirely sure what your comment has to do with the original question posed. Every city has it's more economically depressed areas and that's true throughout the rest of the world as much as it is here. I have noticed a good portion of your posts seem to focus on what you see as the negatives of your city and it's current redevelopment. You also seem to hold "millenial hipsters" directly responsible for what you perceive as a failed revitalization attempt. I think reaching such a conclusion is premature as most places have only really begun seeing an influx of development within the past ten years. It really takes decades to adequately measure and gauge these sort of social, economic, and demographic transitions.. I personally cannot speak for Pittsburgh directly, as I have never yet had the occasion to visit, but my city, Cincinnati, seems to be going through a similar transition.

Perhaps it is because I am a member of the oft maligned millennial generation (or could even be perjoratively termed a hipster because of where I choose to spend my time and money), that I will have to disagree with your assessment of the state of urban areas throughout the country. For example, in Cincinnati, the revitalization of the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood (immediately adjacent to downtown) over the past ten years has ignited a renaissance throughout the rest of the city. Neighborhood after neighborhood is being rehabbed, renovated, and restored to their former glory. My wife and I have chosen to make our home in an inner city neighborhood just a couple miles east of downtown. It is an economically and racially diverse neighborhood, with a new brewery in the works. We have numerous shops and art galleries within walking distance, as well as a quaint new neighborhood spot called Myrtle's Punch House.

Now I'm not sure what your definition of a city's neighborhoods being a "dump" looks like, but I can assure you here in my city, we are doing everything that we can to turn back the tide of urban decay wrought by decades of white flight and misguided "urban renewal" projects. This isn't about creating a millennial hipster paradise. It's about creating vibrant, sustainable and stable neighborhoods throughout our cities that old neighbors and new will want to work, play, and lead fulfilling lives in. That's a future I can whole heartedly support.

With regards to the original poster's inquiry, for me, I have been pleasantly surprised by Columbus and St Louis, though I did know very little about either of them going in.

I was thoroughly unimpressed by Galveston, TX, as I thought the very charming central part of town was overshadowed by the sprawling oil refineries that seemed about to swallow the city up. I guess I had set my expectations too high.
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Old 03-31-2016, 08:39 AM
 
7,698 posts, read 4,554,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomomo07 View Post
Not entirely sure what your comment has to do with the original question posed. Every city has it's more economically depressed areas and that's true throughout the rest of the world as much as it is here. I have noticed a good portion of your posts seem to focus on what you see as the negatives of your city and it's current redevelopment. You also seem to hold "millenial hipsters" directly responsible for what you perceive as a failed revitalization attempt. I think reaching such a conclusion is premature. I personally cannot speak for Pittsburgh directly, as I have never yet had the occasion to visit, but my city, Cincinnati, seems to be going through a similar transition.

Perhaps it is because I am a member of the oft maligned millennial generation (or could even be perjoratively termed a hipster because of where I choose to spend my time and money), that I will have to disagree with your assessment of the state of urban areas throughout the country. For example, in Cincinnati, the revitalization of the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood (immediately adjacent to downtown) over the past ten years has ignited a renaissance throughout the rest of the city. Neighborhood after neighborhood is being rehabbed, renovated, and restored to their former glory. My wife and I have chosen to make our home in an inner city neighborhood just a couple miles east of downtown. It is an economically and racially diverse neighborhood, with a new brewery in the works. We have numerous shops and art galleries within walking distance, as well as a quaint new neighborhood spot called Myrtle's Punch House.

Now I'm not sure what your definition of a city's neighborhoods being a "dump" looks like, but I can assure you here in my city, we are doing everything that we can to turn back the tide of urban decay wrought by decades of white flight and misguided "urban renewal" projects. This isn't about creating a millennial hipster paradise. It's about creating vibrant, sustainable and stable neighborhoods throughout our cities that old neighbors and new will want to work, play, and lead fulfilling lives in. That's a future I can whole heartedly support.

With regards to the original poster's inquiry, for me, I have been pleasantly surprised by Columbus and St Louis, though I did know very little about either of them going in.

I was thoroughly unimpressed by Galveston, TX, as I thought the very charming central part of town was overshadowed by the sprawling oil refineries that seemed about to swallow the city up. I guess I had set my expectations too high.

He doesn't live in Pittsburgh. He lives in a dull exurb. He decided, long ago, that the city was for poor people, and its revitalization eats him up inside.
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Old 03-31-2016, 09:00 AM
 
1,851 posts, read 1,476,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
He doesn't live in Pittsburgh. He lives in a dull exurb. He decided, long ago, that the city was for poor people, and its revitalization eats him up inside.
How people develop such deep disdain for specific cities is seriously mind boggling.

You may not appreciate the city, but there are many that do.
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Old 03-31-2016, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,225,310 times
Reputation: 3346
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
How people develop such deep disdain for specific cities is seriously mind boggling.

You may not appreciate the city, but there are many that do.
Does having a consistently God-awful experience living in a city count as a valid reason to dislike that city? Because it does in my mind...given my experience.
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Old 03-31-2016, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,720 posts, read 1,400,204 times
Reputation: 2089
I would say D.C. loses its charm after living there for a while and it's a city that I still really enjoy.

The summers are oppressively hot, you get tired of $9 beers, there are roaches and rats everywhere, the metro breaks down frequently and traffic is pretty terrible. That being said D.C. has free events all of the time, it has such a high concentration of intelligent and passionate people, it's public transportation is extensive and you will never be bored.
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Old 03-31-2016, 04:58 PM
 
611 posts, read 435,238 times
Reputation: 671
For me New Orleans gains charm everytime I visit, but I don't want to move their and get disillusioned.

I will gladly take it in packets.

I agree with the op on San Antonio. It lost its charm quickly for me.
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Old 03-31-2016, 08:30 PM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,558 posts, read 2,579,837 times
Reputation: 2978
SF loses it's charm once you see through the facades locals present.
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