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Old 04-02-2016, 07:53 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,181 posts, read 5,409,964 times
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https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...urban-revival/

...suburbs are still growing.
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Old 04-02-2016, 04:42 PM
 
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This isn't very surprising, although it is interesting that urban areas did grow faster previously. I wonder how this would break down by region.
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Old 04-03-2016, 01:16 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
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Thats because suburbs have a larger share of families with kids, those numbers do not mean people actually are moving into the suburbs.

Whats interesting is that urban areas/high density suburbs actually have positive growth now. The cities haven't had cumulative positive growth since like WW2.
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Old 04-03-2016, 06:26 AM
 
7,691 posts, read 4,551,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Thats because suburbs have a larger share of families with kids, those numbers do not mean people actually are moving into the suburbs.

Whats interesting is that urban areas/high density suburbs actually have positive growth now. The cities haven't had cumulative positive growth since like WW2.
People on this forum obsessed with population growth. A lot of places with high growth were under developed to begin with, which allows them to grow more. Household size is definitely a key factor as well. I currently live in Pittsburgh, and anyone who's been here can see the city is booming, but population growth is modest because families are being gentrified out and being replaced by singles and childless couples.
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Old 04-03-2016, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,630,168 times
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I agree with this.

It seems as though the widespread gentrification is concentrated in a dozen or so cities that are in metropolitan areas that were already affluent.

Denver, San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles are not indicative of the rest of the country.

Most big and medium sized cities have maybe fixed up or neighborhood or two but outside of a small zone the vast majority of big and medium sized cities are not really changing and many are getting more poverty-ridden and dumpy as time goes on.

Outside of a dozen affluent cities, most inner-cities just don't offer much except for old buildings to look at.

Many large and medium sized cities are suburbanizing faster then ever and for good reason. Why deal with either social problems or high costs when one can be 15 minutes away and usually have half the cost per square foot, more bix-box shopping amenities and much more orderly areas.

If all cities had such large scale gentrification then why is poverty rate increasing in most big cities?
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Old 04-07-2016, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Clifton, Cincinnati
114 posts, read 80,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
I agree with this.

It seems as though the widespread gentrification is concentrated in a dozen or so cities that are in metropolitan areas that were already affluent.

Denver, San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles are not indicative of the rest of the country.

Most big and medium sized cities have maybe fixed up or neighborhood or two but outside of a small zone the vast majority of big and medium sized cities are not really changing and many are getting more poverty-ridden and dumpy as time goes on.

Outside of a dozen affluent cities, most inner-cities just don't offer much except for old buildings to look at.

Many large and medium sized cities are suburbanizing faster then ever and for good reason. Why deal with either social problems or high costs when one can be 15 minutes away and usually have half the cost per square foot, more bix-box shopping amenities and much more orderly areas.

If all cities had such large scale gentrification then why is poverty rate increasing in most big cities?

You're mistaken if you think large scale gentrification isn't happening throughout many cities in the country. My city, Cincinnati, is experiencing gentrification in the urban core that rivals anything happening in the larger cities in the country. Google Over-the-Rhine, which has become a poster child for urban renewal.
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Old 04-07-2016, 07:55 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,242,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomomo07 View Post
You're mistaken if you think large scale gentrification isn't happening throughout many cities in the country. My city, Cincinnati, is experiencing gentrification in the urban core that rivals anything happening in the larger cities in the country. Google Over-the-Rhine, which has become a poster child for urban renewal.
I am in Cincy frequently for business, and there is very little gentrification.

Over the Rhine is one neighborhood, and even OTR is like half ghetto (the northern and eastern parts). Most of the city is working class and in no risk of gentrification.
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Old 04-07-2016, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,716 posts, read 7,666,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomomo07 View Post
You're mistaken if you think large scale gentrification isn't happening throughout many cities in the country. My city, Cincinnati, is experiencing gentrification in the urban core that rivals anything happening in the larger cities in the country. Google Over-the-Rhine, which has become a poster child for urban renewal.
I don't think OTR comes close to gentrification in Boston. That's not an insult or anything. OTR is way cooler than most Boston neighborhoods. Parts of Boston like Southie and Fenway are just building huge glass box apartments with lame yuppie bars. Soulless stuff. OTR has personality.
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Old 04-07-2016, 10:32 AM
 
7,691 posts, read 4,551,558 times
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Of course it's just the affluent for gentrifying cities. Poor people are being forced out. Those are the people who are moving to the suburbs these days. This isn't rocket science
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