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Old 04-04-2016, 05:14 PM
 
7,694 posts, read 4,551,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Yes but as I said some of those streets were not so walkable in terms of some of those streets not being near a grocery store or pharmacy or everyday things that people would need that were close to their apartments. I guess it would also depend upon how far one would consider something was walkable from where they live and what they were walking to get.

The point was, as the other poster guessed, those were links were of downtown neighborhoods so I confirmed that.
Thank you. You and I have similar definitions of walkable neighborhoods. Grocery and pharmacy are absolute musts. People who equate city living with downtown living are usually suburbanites who don't understand that no matter how many condos they build, most downtowns are not true residential neighborhoods.
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Old 04-04-2016, 06:16 PM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,006,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Yes but as I said some of those streets were not so walkable in terms of some of those streets not being near a grocery store or pharmacy or everyday things that people would need that were close to their apartments. I guess it would also depend upon how far one would consider something was walkable from where they live and what they were walking to get.
Two of those streetviews are basically around the corner from a grocery store. The other ones are maybe a five minute walk to a couple and just blocks away from a Target. There's drug stores and pharmacies all over downtown Portland and the inner core(and a huge Fred Meyer on Burnside). It's walkable by any standard in Downtown and inner NW/Goose Hollow/Pearl District areas.

The rest of Portland varies from streetcar suburb that are walkable in pre-1940s constructed areas to post-war areas not really considered walkable(no sidewalks because the city was too cheap to build them further out).
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Old 04-05-2016, 11:40 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,136,680 times
Reputation: 1850
Salt Lake City. First thing that comes to mind for people who have never been are the "weird" Mormons. Women wearing prairie dresses and men dressed liked Hasidic Jews. Everyone has at least 6 wives.

Reality, it's a very typical Western American city with people who act just like most of us. It can be friendly, it can been polite, it can be rude. There are slums, nice neighborhoods, there are parks. There are freeways, bars and restaurants that serve- Yes liquor! You have cowboys and Hispanics, business people, even a few African Americans and Asians. Catholics and Lutherans. Actually fairly typical for this part of the country. People go to work, go home, and then some toss back a few beers like my Mormon neighbors used too.

It's just like everywhere else and it's in a beautiful part of the country. I truly believe if it weren't for the "Mormon" stigma, it could be as large as Denver.
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Old 04-05-2016, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,651,778 times
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People automatically assume all New Yorkers are like the ones on "Seinfeld." I didn't meet any New Yorkers like them when I was there and any New Yorkers whom I have met outside of New York weren't like them either.
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Old 04-05-2016, 01:46 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Denver, and Austin all belong to the same family of hip and sexy cities.
This is simply your opinion. Anyone that has visited those cities can tell them all apart. There can be people that find Seattle sexy and hip, but find San Francisco lame and vice versa.

Out of the aforementioned, it is Austin that's gets the most praise from people on here that have never been there. I've heard many comments from people that have never visited Austin or even Texas and have said that it is the "only city in Texas they can live in" or it's the only "open-minded and accepting city" in Texas. It's claimed to be the best of the best, even in categories that rightfully go to Houston or Dallas. New transplants to Austin that haven't traveled to the other cities in Texas are baffled to find out that cities like Dallas have creative areas, live music, diversity, and people that are tolerant and accepting of others.

A lot of sunbelt cities, such as Houston, Atlanta, Dallas, and Phoenix do get bashed by people that have never visited those cities. They are all lumped together, even though they have some pretty distinct differences. Phoenix is nowhere near as walkable or urban as Dallas and Austin is not somehow magically exempt from that notorious "sunbelt sprawl." People on here really need to get out and visit these places and understand that not everyone finds the same places "hip, sexy, and cool."
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Old 04-05-2016, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,374 posts, read 1,193,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
People automatically assume all New Yorkers are like the ones on "Seinfeld."
Aside from George, the characters on Seinfeld could be from anywhere in the country, honestly.
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Old 04-05-2016, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,651,778 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
Aside from George, the characters on Seinfeld could be from anywhere in the country, honestly.
Good point. I have come across characters like these every place I have ever been. Only the accents were different.
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Old 04-05-2016, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,955 posts, read 22,094,309 times
Reputation: 10687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kar54 View Post
Salt Lake City. First thing that comes to mind for people who have never been are the "weird" Mormons. Women wearing prairie dresses and men dressed liked Hasidic Jews. Everyone has at least 6 wives.

Reality, it's a very typical Western American city with people who act just like most of us. It can be friendly, it can been polite, it can be rude. There are slums, nice neighborhoods, there are parks. There are freeways, bars and restaurants that serve- Yes liquor! You have cowboys and Hispanics, business people, even a few African Americans and Asians. Catholics and Lutherans. Actually fairly typical for this part of the country. People go to work, go home, and then some toss back a few beers like my Mormon neighbors used too.

It's just like everywhere else and it's in a beautiful part of the country. I truly believe if it weren't for the "Mormon" stigma, it could be as large as Denver.
As a lifelong resident of Salt Lake City, I believe there's a lot of ignorance out there about what Salt Lake City is really like. A number of years back, I used to travel quite a bit on business. I was at a seminar in L.A. and a guy I met (a native Californian) asked where I was from. When I said, "Salt Lake City," he got a kind of a disgusted look on his face and said, "Salt Lake, huh? Armpit of the earth." Without even thinking, I responded, "Oh, so you've never been to Salt Lake?" He looked at me like I was some kind of clairvoyant. "No," he said. "I haven't. How did you know?" "I knew," I answered, because no one who actually had been to Salt Lake would describe it like that." He seemed genuinely baffled.

I do a lot of volunteer work in the tourism industry and never cease to be amazed at how pleasantly surprised people who visit Salt Lake City for the first time are. No, Salt Lake's not San Francisco or New York or New Orleans, but it's a great place to visit and a perfect jumping off point to see five of the country's most gorgeous national parks (in Utah) plus several more in surrounding states. People are very seldom disappointed by Salt Lake City.
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Old 04-05-2016, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,310,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
This is simply your opinion. Anyone that has visited those cities can tell them all apart. There can be people that find Seattle sexy and hip, but find San Francisco lame and vice versa.
I think his opinion isn't that far off...
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Old 04-05-2016, 08:47 PM
 
Location: LoS ScAnDaLoUs KiLLa CaLI
1,227 posts, read 1,194,833 times
Reputation: 1179
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInPortland View Post
This. People will try to judge "urbanity" and street activity, by looking at some street views...they'll go on for pages while people who've actually been in or lived in a city get shouted down by them.

The worst was a Mexico City thread where someone who'd never been to Mexico City at any point in there life just kept arguing based on random street views of obscure neighborhoods(there's probably over a thousand different colonias or neighborhoods in Mexico City being one of the largest cities in the world), meanwhile people who'd actually lived there were like, okay, whatever...

Also, judging cities based solely on Census stats, or claiming to be an expert on ethnic populations of various places by just quoting numbers.
Yeah. I get that there are so many objective indicators out there that could be explained with a number, but there are also plenty of things about cities that can only be experienced by feel. If cities were as impersonal as just the mere numbers, then what good is there to even have a discussion about them? There is no discussion.

What makes a city a city isn't the buildings, but the people who live there. If it weren't for the people, cities or states or countries would just be land with buildings on them.
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