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Old 04-05-2016, 04:12 PM
 
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Sioux Falls, SD has also been experiencing a lot of growth over the last few years. It has very low unemployment and a sturdy economy based, I think, on health care, banking and farming. It is very affordable, and within the last few years Augustana has evolved from a "college" to a University. Also, both of the two largest state universities are within a common daily commuting distance - less than an hour away.

The MOST booming city, though, is probably Des Moines, IA. Ames, where Iowa State University is located, is in the commuting corridor to and from Des Moines.

Minneapolis is an economically solid large city, but you could better apply the term "boom" to Des Moines and Sioux Falls, because that term implies fast recent growth.
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Old 04-05-2016, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Does anyone know what's driving Des Moines' boom? Other cities booming in the Midwest that have barely been discussed are Fargo and Bismarck, which are booming as a trickle-down from the oil boom in N. Dakota. I don't think that's what's driving Des Moines' boom though.
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Old 04-05-2016, 11:09 PM
 
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My guess was going to be that it might be related to the boom in farming that ended a few years ago. There is a LOT of money floating around even very small communities, and local and regional banks benefit from that. That boom in the prices of commodities and farm land seemed to have occurred at the same time that the rest of the national economy was tanking 2008 - 10.

But this site: https://www.freeenterprise.com/des-m...-economic-hub/ says that it is because Des Moines has always been conservative and therefore local banks didn't overvalue real estate or overmortage iffy homeowners. Therefore, people and banks in this city were able to thrive when most of the rest of the country fell into the subprime mortgage driven recession of 2008-10. So, maybe it was an advantage to be in "flyover country" and ignored by real estate investors in the years before the recession.

The state also gives very favorable tax rates to corporations, which can be viewed in a variety of ways based on your feelings about that issue. It is true that at the same time the boom has been happening in Des Moines, manufacturing has been in sharp decline in other areas of the state due in a large part to these same corporations outsourcing production overseas, and those other areas, like Davenport/Bettendorf, are still in decline.

Des Moines also has a diversified economy, with the anchors of insurance, health care, banking, and farming.

Come to think of it, these are the same economic anchors in Sioux Falls.
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Old 04-06-2016, 01:46 PM
 
10,552 posts, read 13,107,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Tell that to Dallas and Houston where their growth is bonkers despite being 7.1 and 6.5 million metros respectively.
http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regi...f/qgsp0316.pdf

We'll see how long that lasts though. Texas economic growth has screeched to a halt.
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Old 04-06-2016, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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I agree with North Dakota and South Dakota as well as Lincoln. I also think everyone is on the right path with regards to the major areas that have captured the most growth in the Midwestern region this decade. Here's a comparison of all the major areas that are relatively growing healthily, fast growing, and/or booming in the Midwestern United States. I'll also include Kansas City as well, since it seems to be somewhere in between the cities mentioned in this thread so far and the older legacy cities that are now growing at a very slow rate (most are either posting declines or are still below 1% growth over 5 years and 3 months of this decade). Kansas City on a percentage basis is actually not that far off from Grand Rapids, for example.

Population in 2010 by PCSA:
- Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI CSA: 3,684,928
- Kansas City-Overland Park-Kansas City, MO-KS CSA: 2,343,008
- Columbus-Marion-Zanesville, OH CSA: 2,308,559
- Indianapolis-Carmel-Muncie, IN CSA: 2,266,772
- Grand Rapids-Wyoming-Muskegon, MI CSA: 1,379,239
- Omaha-Council Bluffs-Fremont, NE-IA CSA: 902,041
- Madison-Janesville-Beloit, WI CSA: 827,744
- Des Moines-Ames-West Des Moines, IA CSA: 722,323

Population in 2015 by PCSA:
- Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI CSA: 3,866,768
- Kansas City-Overland Park-Kansas City, MO-KS CSA: 2,428,362
- Columbus-Marion-Zanesville, OH CSA: 2,424,831
- Indianapolis-Carmel-Muncie, IN CSA: 2,372,530
- Grand Rapids-Wyoming-Muskegon, MI CSA: 1,433,288
- Omaha-Council Bluffs-Fremont, NE-IA CSA: 952,018
- Madison-Janesville-Beloit, WI CSA: 866,475
- Des Moines-Ames-West Des Moines, IA CSA: 782,390

Population Growth in Raw Numbers 2010-2015:
- Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI CSA: + 181,840
- Columbus-Marion-Zanesville, OH CSA: + 116,272
- Indianapolis-Carmel-Muncie, IN CSA: + 105,758
- Kansas City-Overland Park-Kansas City, MO-KS CSA: + 85,354
- Des Moines-Ames-West Des Moines, IA CSA: + 60,067
- Grand Rapids-Wyoming-Muskegon, MI CSA: + 54,049
- Omaha-Council Bluffs-Fremont, NE-IA CSA: + 49,977
- Madison-Janesville-Beloit, WI CSA: + 38,731

Population Growth in Percentages 2010-2015:
- Des Moines-Ames-West Des Moines, IA CSA: + 8.30%
- Omaha-Council Bluffs-Fremont, NE-IA CSA: + 5.50%
- Columbus-Marion-Zanesville, OH CSA: + 5.00%
- Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI CSA: + 4.90%
- Indianapolis-Carmel-Muncie, IN CSA: + 4.70%
- Madison-Janesville-Beloit, WI CSA: + 4.70%
- Grand Rapids-Wyoming-Muskegon, MI CSA: + 3.90%
- Kansas City-Overland Park-Kansas City, MO-KS CSA: + 3.60%
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Old 04-06-2016, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Carver County, MN
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Whoa! Columbus is about to pass the KC metro in population? Say it ain't so. For some reason KC seem quite a bit bigger.
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Old 04-07-2016, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Jonesboro
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Default Most booming..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnesota Spring View Post
Whoa! Columbus is about to pass the KC metro in population? Say it ain't so. For some reason KC seem quite a bit bigger.


I agree. Perhaps that's because the older central core of Kansas City looked like a much larger city earlier, say at the time of the end of WW2 for example, than did Columbus. Then tack on the much smaller but immediately adjacent Kansas City, Ks., and there was what appeared to be a considerably larger urban core in existence at that time.
Kansas City also had a considerably larger skyline than Columbus although that distinction & size advantage for Kansas City has blurred somewhat in recent decades.
This older & larger K.C. urban core area is still evident today although the newer buildings now seen in both central cities have lessened the current skyline size contrast. Nevertheless, K.C. still does enjoy somewhat of a skyline advantage over Columbus at this time.
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Old 04-07-2016, 08:14 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,242,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlajos View Post
http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regi...f/qgsp0316.pdf

We'll see how long that lasts though. Texas economic growth has screeched to a halt.
Texas has some of the fastest growth in the U.S.

You can't take 90 days of economic activity as a proxy for overall economic growth; one bad weather event or stock swing will have a huge impact on such a short time period.
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Old 04-07-2016, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,630,168 times
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Year over Year employment growth
Manhattan, KS 3.4%
Fort Wayne, IN 3%
South Bend, IN 2.7%
Indianapolis 2.5%
Grand Rapids 2.6%
Dubuque, IA 2.4%
St. Cloud 2.4%
Rochester, MN 2.4%
Akron, OH 2.3%
Dayton, OH 2.3%
Columbus, OH 2.2%
Madison, WI 2.2%
Detroit 2.1%
Cincinnati 2.0%
Minneapolis 1.8%
Chicago 1.7%
Lincoln 1.6%
Omaha 1.1%
Des Moines 0.9%
Cleveland 0.8%
Milwaukee 0.4%

Sioux Falls seems to have a very good economy and high population growth. It is an area heavy on finance and it has a fairly diverse economy with manufacturing, leisure and hospitality, construction and health care. Sioux Falls has an unemployment rate of 2.7%

Fargo at 3% unemployment. Fargo has a diverse economy. Quite a bit of agriculture and truss manufacturing, lots of construction, three large universities in the metro area, a very high number of health care establishments for such a small city. 700,000 people live in Winnipeg and many go on shopping sprees and stay in Fargo hotels. They have alot of tech and finance also. Unemployment rate of 3%.

Des Moines is always booming. Unemployment rate of 4.1%. Its an epicenter for the insurance industry and it will always do well because it's the big city for such a massive area

Omaha and Minneapolis have great economies relative to much of the country but I think Omaha and Minneapolis best days were in the 1990s. They have decent job growth rates but not like they had in the 90s.

Columbus is also like Omaha and Minneapolis it has had bigger economic booms in the past but it has slow, steady growth.
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Old 04-08-2016, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,584 posts, read 2,381,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnesota Spring View Post
Whoa! Columbus is about to pass the KC metro in population? Say it ain't so. For some reason KC seem quite a bit bigger.
Those are not metro numbers you are looking at.
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