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Old 04-07-2016, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
3,508 posts, read 1,707,992 times
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In Houston our inner suburbs have already gone downhill, but since Houston annexes those suburbs are considered part of the city of Houston. Only a few suburbs have bad areas but the vast majority of suburbs are either borderline low income or middle class/ wealthy. You won't find any ghetto suburbs here that weren't ghetto at their founding. I don't think my suburb is going down because even the area with the most crime isn't that violent and the school is too strong regardless of neighborhood. Although my suburb does have gangs the school district and police officers aren't pushovers. I don't see my area declining because some parts of my suburb are borderline low income and they have been steady neighborhoods since the 80,s and 70's when they were built. My specific neighborhood in this 320,000 people suburb has houses too expensive to decline, unless criminals can afford upwards of a 500,000 dollars and minimum of 350,000-450,000 dollar houses they can't get a house within 2 miles of me, so although I live in a bubble my dad has friends all over Houston so I often go into "ghetto" neighborhoods.
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Old 04-07-2016, 07:02 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,307 posts, read 19,585,657 times
Reputation: 13098
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
What about the city you live in? Any big changes in your suburbs over the years? Some you wouldn't want to live in anymore? Any that are headed for deterioration? Any that are coming back to life?
Do you mean only the inner suburbs close to the city? Or are you also including the ones further out?
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Old 04-07-2016, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,435 posts, read 21,272,660 times
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All suburbs, generally.

I've seen what's happened in Los Angeles, the pushing of the minorities out east to San Bernardino/Rialto, and to Victorville/Hesperia, and north to Palmdale/Lancaster. Which makes for some mighty long commutes for these people! San Bernardino has really gone down hill, filing for bankruptcy a couple years ago. Hard to even get police officers to work there with the low pay.

The near eastern suburbs of L.A., the Asians have taken over! Monterrey Park (sometimes called the Asian Beverly Hills) in the downtown area, I dare you to find a business that doesn't have Chinese lettering! It's the new China town!

Last summer, curiously, I decided to explore the notorious South Central L.A. area by public bus, and I can see it all too well, that the day will come that South Central/Compton/Watts will be gentrified, given new life!
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Old 04-08-2016, 05:02 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,307 posts, read 19,585,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
All suburbs, generally.

I've seen what's happened in Los Angeles, the pushing of the minorities out east to San Bernardino/Rialto, and to Victorville/Hesperia, and north to Palmdale/Lancaster. Which makes for some mighty long commutes for these people! San Bernardino has really gone down hill, filing for bankruptcy a couple years ago. Hard to even get police officers to work there with the low pay.
The big dividing line that I've seen everywhere I've looked in America is the separation between affluent areas and low income areas. This goes for the cities as well as the suburbs.

The affluent areas have a significantly higher quality of life than the low income areas. And this difference seems to have become starker over time.
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Old 04-08-2016, 09:45 AM
 
2,167 posts, read 1,468,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Pittsburgh became trendy for about 5 secs and everyone wanted to live downtown. The COL skyrocketed and the millennials never bought homes in depressed neighborhoods and revitalized them like the national media said they would so now we have a city with a drastic difference between the rich and poor. Pittsburgh is the new Cleveland. The middle class is rushing for the outlying suburbs. I've really seen the change in the past 2 years and the growth outside the county limits is only escalating.
180 degrees off. Reverse everything in this post and it's corrected.
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Old 04-08-2016, 11:53 AM
 
3,516 posts, read 4,970,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
People in the DC area told me that young white people are starting to buy in Gaithersburg.
I think you have Gaithersburg confused with some other community. Gaithersburg, MD is a rather distant suburb that started developing only in the 1960s- 1970s. Later on, it attracted many minority races, but it still appears clean and upscale.
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Old 04-08-2016, 01:00 PM
 
7,744 posts, read 4,587,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
I think you have Gaithersburg confused with some other community. Gaithersburg, MD is a rather distant suburb that started developing only in the 1960s- 1970s. Later on, it attracted many minority races, but it still appears clean and upscale.
I type Gaithersburg, but I meant Hyattsville
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Old 04-09-2016, 12:37 PM
 
3,516 posts, read 4,970,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I type Gaithersburg, but I meant Hyattsville
Yes - young people are attracted to the leafy, older historic homes in historic Hyattsville near U.S. Route 1. It's being promoted as an "Arts District" with art studios. There's a huge, 2-story combination restaurant and toy store/ novelty shop there called "Franklin's" -- and next to it is also a branch of the "Busboys and Poets" local coffee-shop chain.
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