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Old 04-05-2016, 01:44 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,386 posts, read 21,228,976 times
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One of the earliest suburbs in this country was The Bronx, in NYC, where up-and-coming Jews vacated the Lower East Side for greener pastures. A fine middle class suburb at one time, and now?

A philosopher one time predicted our suburbs are our future slums.

What about the city you live in? Any big changes in your suburbs over the years? Some you wouldn't want to live in anymore? Any that are headed for deterioration? Any that are coming back to life?
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Old 04-05-2016, 05:52 AM
 
7,702 posts, read 4,562,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
One of the earliest suburbs in this country was The Bronx, in NYC, where up-and-coming Jews vacated the Lower East Side for greener pastures. A fine middle class suburb at one time, and now?

A philosopher one time predicted our suburbs are our future slums.

What about the city you live in? Any big changes in your suburbs over the years? Some you wouldn't want to live in anymore? Any that are headed for deterioration? Any that are coming back to life?
The Bronx hasn't been a suburb since the 19 century. Jews didn't start moving there in any numbers until after World War I. In addition the Bronx has and has always had many nice middle-class neighborhoods. The South Bronx is still pretty bad, but they're working on gentrifying that. The even have a new name; the piano district.

Interns of actual suburban revitalization, it's obvious that inner ring, urbanized suburbs of major cities are going to see the biggest movement. Jersey City and Hoboken made the leap about 15 years ago. I could see Mount Vernon, New Rochelle and Yonkers gentrifying. People in the DC area told me that young white people are starting to buy in Gaithersburg.
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Old 04-06-2016, 01:18 PM
 
Location: New England
107 posts, read 72,272 times
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I have a house on a lake about 10 miles from the major city. When I was growing up there was nobody out here, nothing but a bowling alley, root bear stand, and a small cluster of building about a mile down the road. (oh with a lovely New England white Baptist church that rang it's bells at noon .

Now the east side of town is national chains, box stores, freeway (loop on west side of city) and traffic. When I was growing up nobody even wanted to come out my way as far as I lived. Now it's in one of the inner belts of suburbs, and all of the small homes on my street (mostly summer homes) have turned into McMansions, as the upper-middle class have found our little enclave. They have also formed an "association" for homeowners on the lake and want to charge a yearly fee, stickers on boats, trespassing, on and on and on. I've never paid a dime to this association. We've been here since the '40's and they've never pushed it. When I was growing up anybody could go to the "public beach" across the lake, and anybody could launch their boats at several locations.

I remember back in the '80's, I was living in Texas and came up here. I wanted to put a canoe at a former launch spot down the street. Myself and a friend were struggling with the canoe and some guy comes out of his house and says, with suspicion and condensation, "Do you live around here?" I said, "I've been here since I was born and my father's been here probably before you were born."

The impasse was settled when the neighbor next to the canoe launch came out of the house and vouched for me. The nerve!
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Old 04-06-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Illinois
989 posts, read 594,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noccidoggo View Post
I have a house on a lake about 10 miles from the major city. When I was growing up there was nobody out here, nothing but a bowling alley, root bear stand, and a small cluster of building about a mile down the road. (oh with a lovely New England white Baptist church that rang it's bells at noon .

Now the east side of town is national chains, box stores, freeway (loop on west side of city) and traffic. When I was growing up nobody even wanted to come out my way as far as I lived. Now it's in one of the inner belts of suburbs, and all of the small homes on my street (mostly summer homes) have turned into McMansions, as the upper-middle class have found our little enclave. They have also formed an "association" for homeowners on the lake and want to charge a yearly fee, stickers on boats, trespassing, on and on and on. I've never paid a dime to this association. We've been here since the '40's and they've never pushed it. When I was growing up anybody could go to the "public beach" across the lake, and anybody could launch their boats at several locations.

I remember back in the '80's, I was living in Texas and came up here. I wanted to put a canoe at a former launch spot down the street. Myself and a friend were struggling with the canoe and some guy comes out of his house and says, with suspicion and condensation, "Do you live around here?" I said, "I've been here since I was born and my father's been here probably before you were born."

The impasse was settled when the neighbor next to the canoe launch came out of the house and vouched for me. The nerve!
This makes me sad. Have you seen the movie with Steve Carrell called the Way Way Back? It takes place in a small coastal town someplace on the east coast and it just exuded that old school vibe that seems to be gone from just about anywhere now. I watched that movie and wished I could live, or even just vacation in a quaint spot like that where corporate stuff had not yet polluted it.
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Old 04-06-2016, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Illinois
989 posts, read 594,294 times
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To answer the question, I can speak for Chicago's burbs. For the most part, everything just kept moving further and further out until about 10-15 years ago, when it mostly subsided.

Many of the suburbs have beautifully maintained downtown districts, with train tracks, old stores, street lamps, etc. The neighborhoods surrounding them are typically preserved quite well, maybe some McMansions (it depends on the suburb). The change/development is mostly in the outlying neighborhoods of each suburb, where retail stores litter all the thoroughfares that frame track housing subdivisions.

Naperville is one of the largest suburbs and it's changed a lot. Back in the 80s kids would cruise the downtown streets, go to one of a handful of restaurants and chill by the riverwalk. Now the downtown is a high-end mecca of stores and restaurants and cruising is banned. But it's gorgeous. And there are McMansions everywhere.

One suburb of Chicago that has changed a lot in recent years is Oswego. This was a podunk farming community with a small downtown along the Fox River. Now it's considered a full blown suburb with two massive high schools and its version of all the standard trendy retail chain stores.
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Old 04-06-2016, 07:15 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,131 posts, read 9,903,738 times
Reputation: 6423
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
One of the earliest suburbs in this country was The Bronx, in NYC, where up-and-coming Jews vacated the Lower East Side for greener pastures. A fine middle class suburb at one time, and now?

A philosopher one time predicted our suburbs are our future slums.

What about the city you live in? Any big changes in your suburbs over the years? Some you wouldn't want to live in anymore? Any that are headed for deterioration? Any that are coming back to life?
The Bronx, the South Bronx anyway, was destroyed by terrible overdevelopment and zoning. Take a google street view of parts of the South Bronx even today, such as around the Grand Concourse. You will see block after block after block of apartment buildings, 6 to 10 stories tall with no greenery in sight. Not surprisingly the Middle Class began to leave such areas for greener pastures as soon as they could.

In today's New York City suburbs in New York State (Long Island and the Hudson Valley), its all about the school district. As long as the school district holds up, along with better suburban zoning, more open space and less crime, the majority of New York's suburbs will continue to be desirable. The same with New Jersey and Connecticut.
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Old 04-06-2016, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,826,606 times
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Pittsburgh became trendy for about 5 secs and everyone wanted to live downtown. The COL skyrocketed and the millennials never bought homes in depressed neighborhoods and revitalized them like the national media said they would so now we have a city with a drastic difference between the rich and poor. Pittsburgh is the new Cleveland. The middle class is rushing for the outlying suburbs. I've really seen the change in the past 2 years and the growth outside the county limits is only escalating.
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Old 04-06-2016, 07:28 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,424 posts, read 18,324,231 times
Reputation: 11902
A lot of suburban neighborhoods in the West built in the 50's/60's/70's are often considered throw away neighborhoods; that is unless the community where they were built has a certain niche. Suburban homes really started getting bigger with more space in the 80's and thereafter. Though the homes from earlier periods between the 50's - 70's usually have more generous lot sizes than post 80's/90's suburban neighborhoods.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 04-06-2016 at 07:57 PM..
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Old 04-06-2016, 07:45 PM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,124,669 times
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Twin Cities - inner ring burbs like Golden Valley, St Louis Park, Hopkins are starting to see the little MCM ranches and post-war bungalows being bought by younger people and renovated. Housing stock is older/smaller but very perfect for first time buyers.
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Old 04-06-2016, 08:49 PM
 
1,586 posts, read 1,539,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I could see Mount Vernon, New Rochelle and Yonkers gentrifying.
Kinda strange to hear speculation about New Rochelle "gentrifying" -- it's got its rough spots, but for a long time (maybe always?), it's also had large parts that are quite wealthy. This is New Rochelle:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.9384...8i6656!6m1!1e1

The Providence suburb I've lived in for the past year, East Greenwich, is one of the highest-income towns in Rhode Island, but my understanding is that it used to be distinctly working class. There are still signs of that history around town (such as the street I live on). Around the corner from me, there's a huge sprawling mansion right next to a tiny shack (on a large property, because the area used to be more rural).
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