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Old 04-17-2016, 11:33 AM
 
585 posts, read 679,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aewan68 View Post
Atlantic Beach, near Jax never been there but been through Jax a few times, it's a totally different vibe then SoFla, Jax is very "Southern", SoFla is further South but the Southern vibe does not exist, much comes with that vibe if you know what I'm saying? I lived in the real south prior, so I know what it is, if you are a native Californian who never lived anyplace else you won't get what I'm talking about.

Jax has a lower COL, than SoFla, so it's not one in the same as my former home with respect to lifestyle or anything else. It also get's colder there in the Winter. Well hope you enjoy it and drive down to SoFla sometime, to see what I mean, mainly between October to late April.

Also prepare yourself for Hurricanes, Jax is not devoid of them. It's been 11 years since the last one hit, we went through several during our time in FL, Wilma was a CAT 3 and it was a bad one, I would not want to feel a CAT 5 direct hit like Andrew in 1992. Just like the big one, it's going to happen sooner or later.
The last hurricane to hit Jacksonville was in 1964. I do get the southern vibe and happen to like it. Not the liberal crap that most California transplants spew out. Our plan is to travel back to our house in Indian Wells for the winters.
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Old 04-17-2016, 10:26 PM
 
Location: North County San Diego Area
786 posts, read 495,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by murfslaw View Post
The last hurricane to hit Jacksonville was in 1964. I do get the southern vibe and happen to like it. Not the liberal crap that most California transplants spew out. Our plan is to travel back to our house in Indian Wells for the winters.
That's what everyone in SoFla thought after Andrew in 1992, then 2004 we got hit my 2 and then 2005 1 more. I rode them all out, I would never ride out a CAT 5 after feeling Wilma and the damage we had.

Duval is more Blue than Red, but not by much or compared to other parts of FL like SoFla.
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Old 04-18-2016, 02:00 PM
 
17,569 posts, read 10,620,140 times
Reputation: 8464
Quote:
Originally Posted by aewan68 View Post
That's what everyone in SoFla thought after Andrew in 1992, then 2004 we got hit my 2 and then 2005 1 more. I rode them all out, I would never ride out a CAT 5 after feeling Wilma and the damage we had.

Duval is more Blue than Red, but not by much or compared to other parts of FL like SoFla.
Don't live in So FL and , well, far less likely to be hit by a hurricane than SoCal by a major fire.
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Old 04-18-2016, 02:13 PM
 
893 posts, read 555,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expatCA View Post
Don't live in So FL and , well, far less likely to be hit by a hurricane than SoCal by a major fire.
The odds of being struck by a hurricane is pretty much the same all over Florida. South Florida has a *slightly* elevated risk, for whatever reason, but we're talking slightly elevated.

It's not like if you settle in Pensacola, Tampa, Daytona, or Cocoa your hurricane days are in the rearview mirror.

And Florida is a narrow peninsula, so even places like Orlando are at risk for suffering major wind damage, lucky though they don't need to worry about storm surge like coastal areas do.
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Old 04-18-2016, 02:23 PM
 
46 posts, read 27,148 times
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If you're looking for the chance to experience heat and avoid cold, it may surprise you that Southern California might be better.

I posted this thread in the weather forum but I thought it could also be useful for those want to seek as a chance to experience heat any time of the year and avoid cold snaps.

I've never meet a heat wave I didn't love and I hate cold with a passion so here's my formula for rating a city's climate.
My ideal weather day is 100F +.

Add up all the record highs for all 12 months of the year + the record lows for the 3 coldest months.
Take the total of all 15 numbers and divide by 15.
That's your climate's score.

I did this for all the major cities in the U.S known for heat.
Here are their scores.

Los Angeles (Downtown's official weather station)

Record highs for each month
Jan 95
Feb 95
Mar 99
April 106
May 103
June 112
July 109
August 106
September 113
October 108
November 100
December 92
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 30
January 28
February 28
Total 1324/15
Score = 88




Phoenix

Record highs for each month
Jan 88
Feb 92
Mar 100
April 105
May 114
June 122
July 121
August 117
September 116
October 107
November 96
December 87
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 20
January 16
February 24
Total 1325/15
Score = 88



Miami


Record highs for each month
Jan 88
Feb 89
Mar 93
April 96
May 96
June 98
July 100
August 98
September 97
October 95
November 91
December 89
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 30
January 28
February 27
Total 1215/15
Score = 81



Houston


Record highs for each month
Jan 84
Feb 91
Mar 94
April 95
May 99
June 107
July 105
August 109
September 109
October 99
November 89
December 85
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 7
January 5
February 6
Total 1184/15
Score = 79



Atlanta

Record highs for each month
Jan 79
Feb 80
Mar 89
April 93
May 97
June 106
July 105
August 104
September 102
October 96
November 84
December 79
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 0
January -8
February -9
Total 1097/15
Score = 73



New Orleans


Record highs for each month
Jan 84
Feb 85
Mar 91
April 93
May 99
June 104
July 102
August 103
September 101
October 97
November 92
December 85
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 11
January 13
February 6
Total 1166/15
Score = 78


Orlando

Record highs for each month
Jan 88
Feb 90
Mar 97
April 99
May 102
June 101
July 101
August 101
September 103
October 98
November 930
December 95
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 18
January 19
February 19
Total 1224/15
Score = 82


Tampa

Record highs for each month
Jan 86
Feb 88
Mar 92
April 93
May 98
June 99
July 98
August 98
September 98
October 96
November 92
December 86
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 18
January 21
February 22
Total 1185/15
Score = 79


Honolulu
Record highs for each month
Jan 88
Feb 86
Mar 89
April 91
May 93
June 92
July 94
August 93
September 95
October 94
November 93
December 85
Record lows for the coldest three months
December 54
January 52
February 52
Total 1255/15
Score = 84


Tidbit: Downtown Los Angeles hasn't seen a freeze since 1979 and will likely never seen one again due to the urban heat island effect while it has seen hundreds of days over 100F. Miami, the warmest part of mainland Florida, Miami has only gotten to 100F once in its entire record keeping history and gotten many, many freezes during that time. It's all time record low is colder than downtown Los Angeles. Central Florida has record lows in the teens and Northern Florida has gotten below 0 before.
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Old 04-18-2016, 02:47 PM
 
893 posts, read 555,758 times
Reputation: 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalHEAT View Post
If you're looking for the chance to experience heat and avoid cold, it may surprise you that Southern California might be better.
It's not better,your arbitrary and ridiculous formula aside. You will spend more days in SoCal wearing a coat than you will in SoFla.
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Old 04-18-2016, 02:58 PM
 
1,750 posts, read 1,631,557 times
Reputation: 1067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
California is very different from Florida.

Cities in California such as Los Angeles, Long Beach, San Francisco and Oakland are much older and more established than those in Florida, so they tend to be more urban, walkable, densely-populated and cosmopolitan by comparison.

Public transportation infrastructure is more comprehensive and utilization rates, higher in California than in Florida. There are also more collective efforts among legislators, citizens and special interest groups alike to expand public transportation infrastructure and increase utilization to reduce automobile dependency and, in the process, improve the general flow of traffic in the state's largest metropolitan areas.

California cities also have far more pre-WWII architecture compared to Florida, the latter of which wasn't really developed until the advent of air conditioning in the mid-to-late 20th century. That’s not to mention that, from the 1970’s onward, Florida developers pretty much bulldozed what remained in terms of early-to-mid 20th century structures to make way for new development. Historical preservation is not one of Florida’s strong suits.

Overall, California has much more pleasant weather than Florida - much less humid and stormy; cooler, drier springs, summers, and autumns; significantly less potential for dangerous weather events such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes and tropical depressions; and less potential for severe flooding. Not to mention there’s far more climatic variation in California, ranging from Mediterranean, oceanic, alpine, high and low desert, etc.

In Florida, it rains nearly every day for 8-9 months and the intense humidity lasts for 9-10 months, depending on the year. The "rainy season" in Florida, which starts in early-to-mid May and lasts until late October, can be very gloomy. "Clear" days, at least by California standards, are almost non-existent in Florida, especially in the summertime.

The nature and varied terrain of California - ocean, mountain, and desert vistas; canyons; forests; grasslands; wetlands; etc. - is much more spectacular than the flat, uninspiring swampy scrubland scenery of Florida. FWIW, snow-capped mountain vistas aren't visible from the beach in Florida, not that any type of mountain vistas exist in Florida to begin with.

For those of you arguing that beaches are "better" in Florida than those in California, name a beach in Florida that's more spectacular than Strands, Monarch, or Thousand Steps Beach or Abalone Cove in Southern California or Big Sur on the Central Coast. Ya, didn't think so.

The milder, less volatile weather and more varied terrain of coastal California encourage outdoor activity and recreation, helping California attain its status as one of the healthiest states in the country. Hiking, mountain biking and surfing among other outdoor recreational activities are much more popular in California. Although better than most Southern states in health metrics, Florida has higher incidences of smoking, obesity, and chronic illness such as diabetes and hypertension than California, partly due to more lower-income individuals and families and less emphasis on active, healthy lifestyles overall.

California has a stronger, more diversified economy than Florida. There's a larger corporate presence and more well-paying industry in California such as IT, biotech, nanotech, life sciences, and investment banking to name a few, so your average Californian tends to be higher earning and more gainfully employed than your average Floridian. Even low-wage, low-skill workers in the manufacturing, trade, and healthcare sectors in California enjoy higher comparative wages, more comprehensive non-wage benefits and better state-level rights and protections than their counterparts in Florida, which is a RTW state with very limited union participation rates. Compared to California, Florida has a service-oriented economy with a strong hospitality/tourism orientation, a sector that is notorious for low wages, limited non-wage benefits and non-existent upward economic mobility. Consistent with Arizona, the service-oriented economy of Florida neither breeds nor attracts highly ambitious youth, so a lot of younger people in Florida tend to be apathetic and complacent. The younger people who are educated and career-oriented tend to move to other states after college, up to and including California.

California is home to a much better educated, more talented workforce - and general populace, for that matter - than Florida, which is one of the reasons why so much modern innovation comes from California. In addition to a strong history of innovation, California has a more competitive ethos, entrepreneurial spirit and intellectual vibe than Florida. This, of course, is due to a multitude of factors, but primarily the greater abundance of well-paying industry as well as more prestigious institutions of higher learning in California.

Because Florida is less educated and cosmopolitan than California in general, you'll encounter much more intolerance and small-mindedness in Florida than in California, not to mention much less support for progressive ideals and movements such as hybrid and electric cars, the "green" movement (i.e., recycling, curbing emissions, etc.), medical marijuana, same-sex marriage, organic eating and living, farmers markets and community-supported agriculture, smoking bans, caps on land development and so forth.

People are a lot more open, tolerant, and accepting in California - no cares what religion you are, where you're from or who you sleep with. There's definitely more of a counterculture element in California compared to just about anywhere in Florida - more hippies, more nature-lovers, more spiritual folks, etc. There's also significantly less tolerance for aggression, shadiness and deviance. Overall, I find California to be a much more humane place than Florida.

In reality, living in Florida is like living in the South, but without the politeness, friendliness and hospitality. The general lack of civility and common courtesy in the major cities is frightening and is due in large part to "six degrees of separation." People are friendlier and more pleasant in California than in Florida, hands down, which is a far less transient, anonymous society.

Unlike California, Florida is loaded with miserable transplants from the Northeast, although mostly New York and New Jersey, who have that lousy "tough-guy" attitude that remains in place even after living in Florida for 20 years - constantly striving to be rude, argumentative, combative, ghetto, shrewd, "street-smart" or some other variant of "tough" while trying to deceive or "put one over" on you in any way possible.

Then, you have to contend with the shady transient element in Florida. IME, everyone down there has a story, and most of the time, it's not pretty. Lots of people in Florida are running from something in their past - a violent ex, a criminal record, an abusive childhood, a history of drug and/or alcohol abuse, a dysfunctional family of origin, a series of legal disputes, etc. People have a lot of "baggage" down there, for sure, which is why there's much more crime and many more drug and social issues in Florida than in California, generally speaking.

However, the worst part about Florida, IMO, is the transplants who move down from the Tri-State area and into shiny new tract homes in gated communities, thinking they've "arrived" like the second coming of the Messiah. Before long, these people think they're rich and, in their minds, "rich" people are rude, even though most people with family and long-term wealth are quite down-to-earth (as anyone who has spent any time at all in California knows). So now, these people begin looking down their noses at people in service industry jobs, treating them like crap. While living in South Florida, I witnessed absolutely horrid behavior among transplants, especially older ones, when talking to store clerks or restaurant servers. I never witnessed anything even remotely comparable in Southern California.

Believe it or not, most of the people who live in California were born in California, so there's a much stronger, more well-defined state culture, and civic pride and engagement levels tend to be higher.
There's less in the way of voter apathy in California, and all of the professional sports teams have larger, more dedicated fan-bases than any team I can think of in Florida, where most sporting events draw larger away-team crowds than home-team crowds. To say that there's a stronger sense of community in your average California communities vs. your average Florida community is an understatement.

California is a lot less transient, too. In addition to many more natives - and very proud, dyed-in-the-wool natives, I might add - California is the type of place where people move to, assimilate to the local culture, and stay whereas Florida, OTOH, is more of a place where people come, complain and leave. People in California pledge their allegiance to California, even if they're from elsewhere originally, whereas people in Florida are more likely to pledge their allegiance to New York, Massachusetts, Illinois or whatever crap-hole Eastern state they crawled out of. That alone should speak volumes to anyone deciding between the two states.

I've lived in both, and without a doubt, the weather, scenery, culture, people and lifestyle among other facets of California are vastly superior to that of Florida. It's not even much of a contest, really.

California, FTW.

This post sounds like the work of '8to32characters'! On and on and on.. yes it rains in FL every day for 8-9 months.. non-stop.

órale vato wass sappening???

CA is less transient.. hehe


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-C5aQT3KVo
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Old 04-18-2016, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,997 posts, read 1,643,027 times
Reputation: 3470
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalHEAT View Post
If you're looking for the chance to experience heat and avoid cold, it may surprise you that Southern California might be better.

I posted this thread in the weather forum but I thought it could also be useful for those want to seek as a chance to experience heat any time of the year and avoid cold snaps.

I've never meet a heat wave I didn't love and I hate cold with a passion so here's my formula for rating a city's climate.
My ideal weather day is 100F +
Sounds like a miserable climate by most people's definition. Sounds like Palm Springs or Phoenix would better suit you.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalHEAT View Post

Tidbit: Downtown Los Angeles hasn't seen a freeze since 1979 and will likely never seen one again due to the urban heat island effect while it has seen hundreds of days over 100F. Miami, the warmest part of mainland Florida, Miami has only gotten to 100F once in its entire record keeping history and gotten many, many freezes during that time. It's all time record low is colder than downtown Los Angeles. Central Florida has record lows in the teens and Northern Florida has gotten below 0 before.

As has been noted, South Florida is consistently warmer than Southern California during the winter. So rattling off the record highs and lows is pretty useless.
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Old 04-18-2016, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,997 posts, read 1,643,027 times
Reputation: 3470
This thread got into a "bug" debate.

I thought this post from the Tampa Forum gives pretty good indication that Fla. is not a bug free paradise:

Another Great Day!

Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Yeah, this and last April haven't been so bad, however, I felt like we had less than pleasant Novembers the past 2 years. Weird, it's like the winter months all moved up (December to April instead of November to March), and I agree, yesterday was pretty darn nice. Hiking, a baseball game, and Universal. I'm not holding my breath that this will last much longer, but enjoying it while it does. Frankly, my favorite month was February, I loved that it went down into the 40s/50s consistently at night, enough so to kill off the bugs so I could just sit out on my back porch and watch the stars, hammock, read and have hot chocolate. Camping at Kissimmee Prairie was especially gorgeous on one of those nights..
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Old 04-18-2016, 07:31 PM
 
17,569 posts, read 10,620,140 times
Reputation: 8464
Quote:
Originally Posted by Majami View Post
The odds of being struck by a hurricane is pretty much the same all over Florida. South Florida has a *slightly* elevated risk, for whatever reason, but we're talking slightly elevated.

It's not like if you settle in Pensacola, Tampa, Daytona, or Cocoa your hurricane days are in the rearview mirror.

And Florida is a narrow peninsula, so even places like Orlando are at risk for suffering major wind damage, lucky though they don't need to worry about storm surge like coastal areas do.
The odds are about the same which is unlikely. North East FL sees far less and has not seem one for a long time. Now fires in SoCal are an annual event.

This list from:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ida_hurricanes

Notice where they hit, it is not that big a list and covers 165 Years.
Storm Saffir-Simpson
Category Date of landfall Year Landfall Intensity
(in knots) Landfall Location Great Middle Florida 3 August 23 1851 100 Panama City Unnamed 3 August 17 1871 100 Jupiter Island Unnamed 3 October 7 1873 100 Captiva Island Unnamed 3 October 3 1877 100 Panama City Unnamed 3 September 10 1882 100 Navarre Unnamed 3 August 16 1888 110 Miami Beach Unnamed 3 October 9 1894 105 Panama City Unnamed 3 September 10 1896 110 Cedar Key Unnamed 3 October 18 1906 105 Marathon (1st landfall)/
Near Flamingo (2nd landfall) Unnamed 3 October 11 1909 100 Marathon Unnamed 3 September 29 1917 100 Okaloosa County
(Ft. Walton Beach) Unnamed 4 September 10 1919 130 Dry Tortugas Great Miami 4 September 18–20 1926 125 Palmetto Bay (1st landfall)/
Orange Beach, AL (2nd landfall)* Okeechobee 4 September 17 1928 125 Palm Beach Unnamed 3 September 4 1933 110 Jupiter Labor Day 5 September 3 1935 160 Craig Key Unnamed 3 October 18 1944 105 Dry Tortugas Unnamed 4 September 15 1945 115 North Key Largo (1st landfall)/
Florida City (2nd landfall) Unnamed 4 September 17 1947 115 Port Everglades
(Ft. Lauderdale) Unnamed 4 September 21–22 1948 115 Saddlebunch Keys (1st landfall)/
Near Chokoloskee (2nd landfall) Unnamed 4 August 26 1949 115 Lantana/
Lake Worth Easy 3 September 5 1950 105 Near Cedar Key King 4 October 18 1950 115 Downtown Miami Donna 4 September 10 1960 115 Conch Key (1st landfall)/
Near Naples (2nd landfall) Betsy 3 September 8 1965 110 Tavernier Eloise 3 September 23 1975 110 Bay County Elena 3 September 2 1985 100 Gulfport, MS* Andrew 5 August 24 1992 145 Elliott Key (1st landfall)/
Near Homestead (2nd landfall) Opal 3 October 4 1995 100 Pensacola Beach Charley 4 August 13 2004 130 Cayo Costa (1st landfall)/
Near Punta Gorda (2nd landfall) Ivan 3 September 16 2004 105 Near Gulf Shores, AL* Frances 2 September 4 2004 105 West Palm Beach, Florida Jeanne 3 September 26 2004 105 Hutchinson Island Dennis 3 July 10 2005 105 Santa Rosa Island Wilma 3 October 24 2005 105 Cape Romano
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