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Old 04-07-2016, 07:16 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,329 posts, read 19,603,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElleFarmer View Post
I'm a small-town girl at heart. I grew up in a small city in Illinois, less than an hour away from St. Louis. So I'm accustomed to certain things: sidewalks on every street, small walkable blocks full of unique shops and restaurants, large parks, and regular community events (like carnivals or block parties) that aren't so large it makes an introvert like me want to crawl into a hole and die. But I also love the convenience of big cities: zoos, museums, sporting events (though I'm mostly a baseball fan), easy public transportation, and huge concerts or political rallies that draw in people by the thousands.
What level of public transportation are you looking for? Sounds to me like you want to move to a large metro area.

The U.S. cities with the best public transportation are New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Boston, San Francisco and Philadelphia.
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Old 04-07-2016, 10:27 AM
 
18 posts, read 16,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
What level of public transportation are you looking for? Sounds to me like you want to move to a large metro area.

The U.S. cities with the best public transportation are New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Boston, San Francisco and Philadelphia.
Extensive public transportation isn't a deal breaker. I can handle driving if I have to. I'd just prefer some kind of way to get around other than driving. In STL, they have the metro, which is so much easier to take to sporting events or downtown to avoid the traffic. Can I handle driving into the city though? Yeah. I'd consider it more of a luxury though than a necessity.
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Old 04-07-2016, 01:50 PM
 
21,222 posts, read 30,452,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElleFarmer View Post
I'm still going to keep researching, but so far, Lexington is in the lead.. It's just so pretty!


Reread your criteria again and please explain how Lexington is leading. Sure it's pretty but it kind of stops there in terms of the rest of it. Or am I missing something???
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Old 04-07-2016, 03:27 PM
 
18 posts, read 16,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post


Reread your criteria again and please explain how Lexington is leading. Sure it's pretty but it kind of stops there in terms of the rest of it. Or am I missing something???
How doesn't it fit my criteria?
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Old 04-07-2016, 04:04 PM
 
6,984 posts, read 14,120,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post


Reread your criteria again and please explain how Lexington is leading. Sure it's pretty but it kind of stops there in terms of the rest of it. Or am I missing something???
OP is looking for a place with a small town feel that still is vibrant. The bonus of Lexington is that it has a strong downtown for its size. If you live in downtown Lexington or some of the areas nearby, walking to games or shows at Rupp Arena is easy and all the bars and restaurants and shops in the downtown area are easy to get to. There is a bus system as well. I've never ridden it, but I'm sure since Lexington is a smaller city with a large student population, it probably runs pretty well if you figure it out.

Cincinnati would be where more of the big city stuff is. Personally I just like the vibe of Louisville more even though it does offer a bit less in big city living (no pro sports teams, only Nordstrom Rack and not a real Nordstrom, etc.). Cincy is the bigger airport and they have pro sports teams. But it is common for people to go between all three cities as they form sort of a triangle. They are easy to access for just day trips from one another. The drives between them are all beautiful. This part of Kentucky has a lot of rolling hills and narrow valleys. Western KY is flat and boring, but central and eastern KY are beautiful.

The benefit of Lexington is that housing is most likely way cheaper than anything in the suburbs of Chicago, Philly, NYC, Boston, etc. The biggest drawback is the lack of public transit. If OP isn't caught up on having the public transit, it's a sensible option. Just watch out for our new governor. We all hate him, including the ones who voted for him. They're all regretting it now
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