U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:15 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,276,387 times
Reputation: 9847

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Detroit is one third deserted. By your logic the drug addict who who hit rock bottom, got clean and move into a boarding house is doing better than the middle-class professional whose 401(k) took a hit.
We are comparing MSA to MSA. Detroit is doing better than Chicago apples-to-apples.

Of course, that doesn't mean it's a better city (it most certainly isn't). But it's performing better right now, both in terms of population and economy.

And re. the cities- they're more alike than different. Both are big, flat Midwest cities on endless grids with massive population decline and huge ghettos. The main difference is that Chicago has a world class downtown with real urban living, and Detroit doesn't. But the typical Detroit-area living is the same as the typical Chicago-area living. Schaumburg looks just like Troy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,274 posts, read 5,500,465 times
Reputation: 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
The Detroit MSA is actually growing, while the Chicago MSA is declining.

So, yeah, they are on different growth trajectories, as surprising as it may be. Of course Detroit (the city) is still a gigantic mess, but metro-to-metro comparison indicates Detroit is doing better as of right now.
I don't think the population estimates from 2010 to now agree with your sentiment:

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Total Population Change April 2010 - July 2015:

- Chicago MSA: + 89,926
- Detroit MSA: + 5,793

(See: 2015 United States Census Population Estimates for PCSAs)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:22 AM
 
10,569 posts, read 13,149,753 times
Reputation: 6366
The Detroit Metro is still down over 200,000 jobs from its peak employment in the 2000s. Chicago metro currently has the most jobs in its history. Detroit simply has further ground to make up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,238,553 times
Reputation: 10285
Chicago (metro and city) lost population in the last year.


I used to live there. I left because of the weather. Chicago has a very diverse economy and that should be a boon to the city as opposed to a hindrance. I have to think high taxes and weather may have something to do with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:28 AM
 
3,972 posts, read 3,508,685 times
Reputation: 6402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
I don't think the population estimates from 2010 to now agree with your sentiment:

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Total Population Change April 2010 - July 2015:

- Chicago MSA: + 89,926
- Detroit MSA: + 5,793

(See: 2015 United States Census Population Estimates for PCSAs)
This doesn't take into account that 2010-2012 Chicago MSA was estimated up in population, it has show 3 straight years of declines. While Detroit MSA was down 2010-2012 recovering from the recession, but has posted 3 straight years of gains. Current economic Data is behind what NOLA is saying regardless of where Detroit's job numbers were in the 2000's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:31 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,080,203 times
Reputation: 2275
Chicago's Black Population Dwindles, Census Numbers Show

This is one explanation....181,000 fewer blacks out of a 200,000 population loss. Also, Chicago is the top city for corporate relocation, and Chicago leads the country in largest influx of downtown residents. I have links, if you must.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:35 AM
 
7,747 posts, read 4,598,217 times
Reputation: 8466
Quote:
Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
Chicago's Black Population Dwindles, Census Numbers Show

This is one explanation....181,000 fewer blacks out of a 200,000 population loss. Also, Chicago is the top city for corporate relocation, and Chicago leads the country in largest influx of downtown residents. I have links, if you must.
Also, gentrification without new construction diminishes city populations. Poor and middle-class families are displaced by more affluent singles and childless couples.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,274 posts, read 5,500,465 times
Reputation: 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
This doesn't take into account that 2010-2012 Chicago MSA was estimated up in population, it has show 3 straight years of declines. While Detroit MSA was down 2010-2012 recovering from the recession, but has posted 3 straight years of gains. Current economic Data is behind what NOLA is saying regardless of where Detroit's job numbers were in the 2000's.
Chicago MSA hasn't shown 3 straight years of population decline, and these aren't job numbers, they are merely population estimates that show Chicago MSA population growth, which is tepid at best, is still an order of magnitude higher than that of Detroit over the same period.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:39 AM
 
7,747 posts, read 4,598,217 times
Reputation: 8466
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterlemonjello View Post
Chicago (metro and city) lost population in the last year.


I used to live there. I left because of the weather. Chicago has a very diverse economy and that should be a boon to the city as opposed to a hindrance. I have to think high taxes and weather may have something to do with it.
I really don't buy the taxes angle. Illinois has a flat state income tax rate that's under 4%. Let's rounded up to four. A household with an income of $200,000 would pay 8000 in state tax. I can't imagine relocating to Texas for $8000 a year. It's even more ridiculous to think of a household making 100,000 or less moving to a different state for savings of less than $4000.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:41 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,276,387 times
Reputation: 9847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
I don't think the population estimates from 2010 to now agree with your sentiment:
Re-read my previous posts. I'm not talking about historical data.

I'm talking about the current population data, not that back in 2010 (when Detroit was in a horrible recession, and when Chicago was doing much better).

The current data clearly shows Detroit is outperforming Chicago, both in terms of population and economy. This is not really disputable, unless you have evidence the Census Bureau is engaged in some vast conspiracy or something.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top