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Old 04-08-2016, 09:54 PM
 
448 posts, read 392,694 times
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So we all know that TX,CO and AZ are attracting lots of residents and have good economies, but NM is in the middle of these states but dosent seem to see the same growth. Why do talk think this is. Just curious why everyone passes up New Mexico. I mean the state just hit 2 million people a few years ago but is losing population .
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Old 04-08-2016, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
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Originally Posted by Nibbidy View Post
So we all know that TX,CO and AZ are attracting lots of residents and have good economies, but NM is in the middle of these states but dosent seem to see the same growth. Why do talk think this is. Just curious why everyone passes up New Mexico. I mean the state just hit 2 million people a few years ago but is losing population .
Urbanization. Albuquerque isn't a major metropolitan area.
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Old 04-08-2016, 10:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by speagles84 View Post
Urbanization. Albuquerque isn't a major metropolitan area.
It has to begin somewhere lol....and there are many smaller cities seeing growth
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Old 04-09-2016, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
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Geography (remoteness) and water. And education.
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Old 04-09-2016, 08:12 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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I'd say the two biggest factors are poor political leadership and education. In order to lure people and jobs into the state, you have to have education up to par with the standards of people who relocate from elsewhere where their kids are attending quality schools. That's one of NM's biggest downfalls and Gov. Martinez along with ABQ Mayor Berry couldn't care less, they are all about the staus quo. Having the highest rate of child poverty in the US doesn't help matters either.

http://www.santafenewmexican.com/new...0742d2379.html
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Old 04-09-2016, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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To some degree I think New Mexico looks at Colorado and Arizona and sees that in many ways they think that those two places have been ruined by growth. Thus there is an significant anti growth sentiment in New Mexico.

As far as Texas goes, I don't think New Mexico is a good comparison because all the growth in Texas is basically in the eastern half of the state. The part of Texas that is close to New Mexico is nothing but boom and bust oil patch as is southeastern NM. The part of Texas that has grown steadily really is nothing like New Mexico.
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Old 04-09-2016, 12:48 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,120 posts, read 17,349,447 times
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Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
I'd say the two biggest factors are poor political leadership and education. In order to lure people and jobs into the state, you have to have education up to par with the standards of people who relocate from elsewhere where their kids are attending quality schools. That's one of NM's biggest downfalls and Gov. Martinez along with ABQ Mayor Berry couldn't care less, they are all about the staus quo. Having the highest rate of child poverty in the US doesn't help matters either.

http://www.santafenewmexican.com/new...0742d2379.html
After reading this article, the age-old question of why do people reproduce if they can't afford to raise the child in question rears it head once again. Equally vexing is the fact that one third of the homes have no parent that works full time or year round work. That means not only did the person reproduce, but it is compounded by the parent not contributing to the child's financial well-being. The state taxpayer, it seems, has to do this instead. This is a recipe for disaster, and is not sustainable in the long term. It has nothing to do with Mayor Berry or Governor Martinez either. This is completely on those irresponsibly family plan, or worse, do not engage in it at all. The parents are also ultimately the most significant when it comes to the outcomes of their children in schools, not the teachers. There are teachers that are more effective than others, but the child has to have discipline and a work ethic when entering kindergarten, and it must be fostered through 12th grade. There is definitely a matter of culture at play. Some cultures put a greater weight on educational attainment and family planning than others do. This is undeniable. Also undeniable is the paucity of good paying, private sector jobs in this state. The federal government owns a large percentage of the land, so it is no wonder they dominate when it comes to viable job placement here. Ultimately, however, the government is not profitable. So those who possess a greater ambition and work ethic are driven out of the state, and seek work elsewhere, unless they are in the professional class (i.e. doctors, lawyers, financial planners).

That said, I do not celebrate population gain like demographers and the chamber of commerce does. I think that zero population growth is the way to go.
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Old 04-09-2016, 03:22 PM
 
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One big difference I see between NM and AZ, though, is the climate of their major cities. Both Albuquerque and Santa Fe regularly see snow every winter. There are a lot of snowbirds moving to places like Phoenix and Tucson to escape the snow. It would be pointless to relocate to NM and be in snow again. Flagstaff gets snow, but it's not exactly "booming" like Phoenix. Also, ASU and UA are pretty good universities. I'm not sure about the rest of the country, but lots of people from CA go there for college and some end up staying. Phoenix is a big airport too.
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Old 04-09-2016, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
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A few potential reasons I can think of:

1) New Mexico's larger, more prominent cities such as Albuquerque and Santa Fe are significantly colder than Phoenix, Tucson and Vegas in the wintertime, so you're going to have fewer transplants from Southern California and cold-weather refugees from the Midwest and East Coast. In-migration from these regions is what largely drives population growth in much of Arizona, southern Nevada and southwestern Utah. Most of these domestic migrants are either over dealing with cold, snow and ice or, in the case of transplants from CA, are apprehensive to dealing with it because they've never dealt with it previously.

2) New Mexico has always had very large Hispanic/Latino and Native American populations, even relative to nearby Southwestern states such as Arizona and Texas. I think that for many transplants from regions of the country where the Latino/Hispanic and Native American populations have historically been very low such as the Upper Midwest, New England, Appalachia and the northern Intermountain West (i.e., ID, MT, WY), for example, that's somewhat of a deterrent. The demographics of cities such as Phoenix, Denver and even SLC with all of it's Mormons, would probably be less disconcerting for most domestic migrants from outside of CA, TX and the Southwest.

3) Overall, New Mexico is a very poor state. This is apparent driving through just about any urban, suburban or rural area in the state. IMO, it appears to be more poverty-stricken than neighboring states, and in the Southwest, that's saying a lot. The level of poverty in NM seems to be more on par with states like AL, MS and LA than AZ, CO or UT. A lot of this, I'm sure, is due to cultural reasons. Again, Hispanic/Latino and Native American people are statistically much poorer and less educated than white, Asian and even black Americans. Higher rates of poverty lead to lower educational attainment levels, increased crime rates and gang membership, more government entitlements and a greater sense of hopelessness and despair.

4) New Mexico is kind of odd when it comes to politics, as it doesn't really fit into a box from a political standpoint. It's not conservative like TX or UT, libertarian like AZ or progressive like CO. In this era of political polarization in the US, it's important for people when moving to a new state to select one where they feel as though their state and local government and fellow citizens share similar values and uphold their best interests.

That's my $0.02.
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Old 04-09-2016, 04:03 PM
 
448 posts, read 392,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
One big difference I see between NM and AZ, though, is the climate of their major cities. Both Albuquerque and Santa Fe regularly see snow every winter. There are a lot of snowbirds moving to places like Phoenix and Tucson to escape the snow. It would be pointless to relocate to NM and be in snow again. Flagstaff gets snow, but it's not exactly "booming" like Phoenix. Also, ASU and UA are pretty good universities. I'm not sure about the rest of the country, but lots of people from CA go there for college and some end up staying. Phoenix is a big airport too.
Yes... I can understand that being one of the reasons to choose AZ over NM but Colorado is seeing a lot of growth and is even colder than New Mexico cities.
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