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Old 04-19-2016, 11:37 AM
 
35,324 posts, read 25,171,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
I've never understood the appeal of Austin. I personally have always found it to be the most boring city in Texas and yes, I lived in Texas. Somebody deserves the money they got for marketing the city.

Uh, the music scene alone destroys the rest of the state.

It's also less conservative than most parts which makes it imminently more livable.
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Old 04-19-2016, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,759,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
I've never understood the appeal of Austin. I personally have always found it to be the most boring city in Texas and yes, I lived in Texas. Somebody deserves the money they got for marketing the city.
How old are you? What do you like to do? Austin doesn't appeal to everyone but I wouldn't call it the most boring my any measure. I lived in Houston and Austin has a more active culture. It's much younger and it appeals more to younger people. Houston for example has no match to 6th Street or the amount of recreation in the city limits, and the activities that UT provides (being that it's a young demographic).
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Old 04-24-2016, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,035 posts, read 4,555,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I grew up in Baton Rouge, home to LSU. It doesn't feel like a college town to me because LSU doesn't dwarf the metro area. Of course lots of entertainment and events involve or are held at LSU campus but many are held elsewhere. College towns to me are far smaller so my experience is pretty different.

Lafayette for instance is a few hundred thousand people smaller and UL takes over it. Most of downtown bars and clubs seem to be UL students.
But as you know, Louisiana college towns are kind of a unique animal because the cajun and creole culture is very strong outside of the university and is another draw entirely.
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Old 04-24-2016, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,532 posts, read 708,496 times
Reputation: 1968
I'm a college student, and honestly? I can't stand it and I'm itching to graduate so I can move somewhere else.

I don't want to sound too prejudiced, but I'm a college student myself so I've got an immunity card. College students, at least at medium-sized state universities like my own, are SO bleeding ignorant and obnoxious. EVERYTHING has to revolve around drinking, partying, and just being loud and intimidating in as many ways as possible on the street. Also, being a college TOWN means there is no real escape, especially if you don't have a car. There is no nightlife around that isn't polluted by these preppy ingrates, and the nearest towns (all smaller than this one) are dozens of miles away. I'm openly bisexual and I'd move to the most religious, homophobic, Bible-thumping redneck town in Mississippi in a second if the only alternative were staying here.
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Old 04-24-2016, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,532 posts, read 708,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
They provide a fresh supply of young people from many different parts of the country and/or the world, which keeps the area current.
Sometimes, but a great many state universities, especially smaller ones, are dominated by people from that state.

Quote:
Since most professors live locally, that adds to the general intellectual composition of the town.
I wish this were the case for me, and I'd be glad to learn it were for most people, but how would professors engage with local life? Here they just teach and go home.
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Old 04-24-2016, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Innotech View Post
But as you know, Louisiana college towns are kind of a unique animal because the cajun and creole culture is very strong outside of the university and is another draw entirely.
Only in the south and I think only cities like Lafayette, Baton Rouge, and NOLA have that appeal. I don't see McNeese or Nichols having that kind of draw. And especially not LaTech, ULM, or Northwestern.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
I'm a college student, and honestly? I can't stand it and I'm itching to graduate so I can move somewhere else.

I don't want to sound too prejudiced, but I'm a college student myself so I've got an immunity card. College students, at least at medium-sized state universities like my own, are SO bleeding ignorant and obnoxious. EVERYTHING has to revolve around drinking, partying, and just being loud and intimidating in as many ways as possible on the street. Also, being a college TOWN means there is no real escape, especially if you don't have a car. There is no nightlife around that isn't polluted by these preppy ingrates, and the nearest towns (all smaller than this one) are dozens of miles away. I'm openly bisexual and I'd move to the most religious, homophobic, Bible-thumping redneck town in Mississippi in a second if the only alternative were staying here.
Where are you?
I don't think moving to a backwater tow would be any better, it would be the same.
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Old 04-24-2016, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,532 posts, read 708,496 times
Reputation: 1968
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Where are you?
Oxford, Ohio, home of Miami University.

Quote:
I don't think moving to a backwater tow would be any better, it would be the same.
Backwater towns are at least quieter, right?
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Old 04-24-2016, 06:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
I have not lived in a college town as a family man, but did spend many years in college towns when I was younger.
In Chapel Hill I'd say at least 50% of your life will revolve around UNC...from entertainment options to general conversation. Tar Heel sports are a big enough deal...your kids might get sucked in although I don't get the sense it's quite to the degree of some other crazier college sports towns.
That said, Chapel Hill is not like your typical small college town...it's a part of a much larger CSA and on top of that it's within the spheres of influence of several other major institutions of higher education. So Chapel Hill is very different from Gainesville, FL, for example.
I lived in Champaign, IL (University of Illinois) for seven years, as a young married and a young single (divorced). Champaign is isolated from any other large metro area, 130 miles from Chicago, 120 from Indianapolis (which we called Indian-no-place), about 180 from St. Louis; it's in "Big Ag" country. The U of I dominated the place. Many "townies" worked there, or had a spouse that worked there. Most entertainment was through UI. UI sports, especially football were very big.

I've lived in Boulder County, CO for 34 years, about 5 miles from the U of CO. Similar, but since Boulder is about 25 miles from Denver, also different. CU employees not such a big part of the workforce. Sports aren't quite as big a deal as in Champaign b/c there are the pro sports in Denver to compete with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
Generally, college towns are more politically liberal towns, even in conservative states. They provide a fresh supply of young people from many different parts of the country and/or the world, which keeps the area current. Usually there are interesting stores, music venues, and unique restaurants to serve such a diverse population. For students who work, they will usually do it cheaply, if you need some added labor (babysitting, snow shoveling). Since most professors live locally, that adds to the general intellectual composition of the town.
Already responded to, but unless the college is private, and/or has a big grad school, most of the students are from in-state. In Champaign, many were from the Chicago area. Even a lot of the grad students were from the midwest. Boulder has a larger out-of-state student population, with many from California, but still about 2/3 of the undergrads are from Colorado. I agree these towns tend to be more liberal. Not so sure about the cheap labor.
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Old 04-24-2016, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,759,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Oxford, Ohio, home of Miami University.


Backwater towns are at least quieter, right?
I didn't think it was that big of a school.
But yeah, a small town would be quieter but I can't imagine it being better because of it. Especially being bi.
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Old 04-25-2016, 08:25 AM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Oxford, Ohio, home of Miami University.


Backwater towns are at least quieter, right?
Do you ever go into Cincinnati, which isn't too far away?
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