U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-13-2016, 04:02 PM
 
1,827 posts, read 1,249,305 times
Reputation: 1822

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Denver:
-can be quite smoggy.
-has had white flight (in the 60's/70s, city schools were forcefully integrated back then), many city schools are still 90%+ Hispanic.
-has urban decay, but it has improved, particularly over the last 5 years.
-Denver is segregated by western standards, most black people live east of I-25 or in Aurora, most Asians are within a few miles of Federal Blvd (or in Aurora), and the south/SW suburbs are very white.

Seattle is particularly lacking in public transportation.

Seattle and Portland have incredibly atrocious traffic, and Denver's is getting there.

Denver has crippling blizzards every year, sometimes a few times a year. Seattle and Portland are crippled by one inch of snow. Seattle and Portland are essentially overcast and/or rainy for 2/3 of the year, and Denver can get snow any month between October and May, thus between May and October, Denver gets severe thunderstorms.

All three cities have gangs (5280's on the fingers are popular in Denver).

All three cities have homeless problems.

All three cities are expensive.

All three cities have been hipsterized beyond recognition.

All three cities are perpetually high, or are trying to get perpetually high.

Any questions?
Do Seattle and Portland really get crippled by an inch of snow? I mean, you are a reliable poster, and I know the cities don't get snow as much as their latitudes would suggest, but I sort of just thought they had some plans ready.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-13-2016, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,099 posts, read 1,123,488 times
Reputation: 1384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Do Seattle and Portland really get crippled by an inch of snow? I mean, you are a reliable poster, and I know the cities don't get snow as much as their latitudes would suggest, but I sort of just thought they had some plans ready.
I don't think they get snow often at all, and places that don't get snow often get screwed over if it snows.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2016, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 675,696 times
Reputation: 1091
Quote:
Originally Posted by blaserbrad View Post
From my perspective, Seattle and Portland are on the West Coast. They are also in the Pacific Northwest. That is what I have known with growing up here and I think it is how most people see the region(s)
I've never heard anyone say differently until that post you responded to. Of course Seattle and Portland are west coast!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2016, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Seattle
565 posts, read 563,586 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Do Seattle and Portland really get crippled by an inch of snow? I mean, you are a reliable poster, and I know the cities don't get snow as much as their latitudes would suggest, but I sort of just thought they had some plans ready.
It's rare that Seattle or Portland get snow but it is also no surprise if it happens. I remember a couple blizzards where snow lasted for a week in Seattle. But typically it won't snow for a year or two and then you'll get 4 in one year, and then it may snow 2 or 3 times the next year, and then not snow again the following year. When it does both cities completely shut down. An inch might half way shut it down, no joke. Black ice and steep hills are a recipie for disaster.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2016, 04:12 PM
 
1,827 posts, read 1,249,305 times
Reputation: 1822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyroninja42 View Post
I don't think they get snow often at all, and places that don't get snow often get screwed over if it snows.
True. I was just going by how much snow averages in Dallas (which really does seem to shut down with any snow) and noticed Seattle got more. For whatever reason, my mind made the jump from Dallas' level of snow to Seattle's level of snow as "near nonexistent" to "common," despite Seattle only averaging two or three inches more.

@Blaserbrad, thanks for the response.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2016, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,407,950 times
Reputation: 13004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Do Seattle and Portland really get crippled by an inch of snow? I mean, you are a reliable poster, and I know the cities don't get snow as much as their latitudes would suggest, but I sort of just thought they had some plans ready.
Seattle doesn't have dedicated plows. Trucks have to get outfitted with snow removal equipment if snow threatens to strike the city. Portland sends 55 dump trucks out to plow main roads when snow hits (how Portland, being prepared and all ). For reference, Denver has 70 dedicated plows, and several pieces of heavy equipment.

Neither city even gets snow every year, so when it does happen, it usually catches people off-guard and society tends to panic. 1/2 hour commutes during regular weather take 4 hours. People slide off the roads, abandon their cars, slide into stoplights, etc. These things happen in Denver as well, but only in large numbers during significant storms.

My greater point being that a below average storm for Denver/NE/Midwest would completely render Seattle and Portland useless. It isn't their fault, it just is what it is. Something to think about when they get their once every few years big storm. It isn't all roses and rhododendrons as OP would suggest.
__________________
Moderator for Los Angeles, The Inland Empire, and the Washington state forums.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2016, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,087 posts, read 1,068,704 times
Reputation: 1933
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Seattle doesn't have dedicated plows. Trucks have to get outfitted with snow removal equipment if snow threatens to strike the city. Portland sends 55 dump trucks out to plow main roads when snow hits (how Portland, being prepared and all ). For reference, Denver has 70 dedicated plows, and several pieces of heavy equipment.

Neither city even gets snow every year, so when it does happen, it usually catches people off-guard and society tends to panic. 1/2 hour commutes during regular weather take 4 hours. People slide off the roads, abandon their cars, slide into stoplights, etc. These things happen in Denver as well, but only in large numbers during significant storms.

My greater point being that a below average storm for Denver/NE/Midwest would completely render Seattle and Portland useless. It isn't their fault, it just is what it is. Something to think about when they get their once every few years big storm. It isn't all roses and rhododendrons as OP would suggest.
All good points, but it's not just a lack of preparation or experience that makes things difficult when it snows in the Pac NW. I think it's worth mentioning that the cities, generally, are quite hilly and that the moisture content of the snow is much higher up here, so when wintry precipitation occurs there's a lot more ice, which is more challenging to deal with.

When I lived in CO I found the snow much easier to deal with than other places that I've lived, for the most part. Especially when I lived on the Front Range, which is obviously really flat and tends to get dry snow. But even with adequate preparedness, any streets near Denver with a serious incline are no-no's. In the mountains, there is a big difference between driving over Vail Pass on a snow-packed surface mid-season vs a slippery wet May snowstorm, in terms of complications. Scratch that, Vail Pass is frequently a pain, regardless!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2016, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
4,370 posts, read 5,140,359 times
Reputation: 3896
I would say the West Coast fits a certain type of person. If you like the idea of diversity, but not the practice of diversity, it's perfect. You can live in your homogeneous neighborhoods, and slum it up in the "city" scratch your diversity itch. And as long as you believe in having your head up your ass it's perfect. People out West are complete airheads, and can't see a world beyond their nose. California is a tax and spend disaster mismanaged at every conceivable level. California is also magic. Want to make an 100+ salary, but live like someone who make 30k? Go to the Bay, you'd love the housing shortage, not being able to rent a place due to racist private renters (most of all who are Asian flat out say they'll only rent to asian tenants). Want to rent and apartment, with no amenities, and sometimes $5,000 deposits? Go to the Bay Area, where you'd bee paying $2700 rent for a one bedroom apartment. Oh yeah, and I hope you love traffic and love driving, because despite the NYC level rents, it's in no way offset by good public transportation. Nope, the name of the game is SPRAWL. Want to buy a house, better hope you have $1.3 million in the bank at any given time. The only time you're going to see the inside of a house for under $4k a month is if you're renting a room for $1800 a month.

But uh, nice weather though, I guess that's something.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2016, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,011 posts, read 639,316 times
Reputation: 2035
Orange County is the epitome of the "West Coast dream" - near-perfect year-round weather, gorgeous coastal and inland scenery, lots of diversity, very physically attractive locals, a strong emphasis on healthy lifestyles, excellent career prospects in most fields, high-income, comfortable suburban layout, well-manicured streets and shopping centers, excellent shopping and other amenities, generally newer architecture and housing stock, generally friendly locals and manageable traffic (at least by LA standards).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2016, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,651,778 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by blaserbrad View Post
From my perspective, Seattle and Portland are on the West Coast. They are also in the Pacific Northwest. That is what I have known with growing up here and I think it is how most people see the region(s)
All the years I was living in Portland, nearly forty, when someone referred to it as being on the West Coast, they were quickly corrected as Oregon being in the PNW. The Seattle people I knew felt the same. So maybe it all depends upon the people you hung out with.

But in any case, I think the lifestyles in the PNW, California and Denver are pretty different and the OP seems to be lumping them all together. Certainly if you liken a Californian with an Oregonian to an Oregonian, the Oregonian will not be pleased.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top