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Old 04-16-2016, 12:41 PM
 
Location: West of the Rockies
1,112 posts, read 1,869,538 times
Reputation: 1086

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
That's unfortunately true. Too many people still believe that just because they see a video of some silliness going on in the street of some West Coast or PNW city they decide it's fun time 24/7 and want to live there. At one time that may have been the situation but today they are more than likely to find overcrowded, overpriced, polluted and overly competitive places when they actually see these places for themselves.

The thrill is gone because of the abundance of people who have flocked to these places before them and still they come.

There are a few still untouched but they don't advertise.
The West Coast cities have already been experiencing this for decades. Denver is now experiencing this (rising housing costs and overcrowdedness without fast enough developments to accommodate it). I think Minneapolis will be the next inland city to experience this. It's been gaining popularity fast, especially amongst broke hipsters. I won't be surprised if it becomes another unaffordable, overhyped city with a huge underclass of transients and $15/hr barista hipsters with children.

The difference between the East Coast rat race vs. the WC rat race is that on the East Coast, it's all tell it like it is, cut & clear, high strung. No one denies that there is a rat race out there, and they accept it. On the West Coast, you are expected to live by this zen calm demeanor and relaxed exterior. Topple that with the fake latte liberalism/"progressiveness" that everyone is supposed to have (especially in SF and Seattle), and the end result is a mirage. Yes, a mirage. A visitor can easily be fooled into thinking West Coast cities are relaxed, happy clouds to live on. But when you are trying to hold down a job out there and you read in between the lines, you will see that the competition is just as fierce as the East Coast. So in the end, you will be in a rat race regardless of which coast you're on. It's just a matter of how you want it served to you.
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Old 04-16-2016, 06:46 PM
 
150 posts, read 147,094 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post

Seattle is particularly lacking in public transportation.
Among these three, Seattle has the highest public transit ridership, the highest transit commute mode share, and is the only one building a primarily grade-separated (either subway or elevated) rail system. So among these three I wouldn't say it's lacking.
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Old 04-16-2016, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
1,723 posts, read 1,137,330 times
Reputation: 1293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
OP, Seattle and Portland are not on the West Coast. The are considered the Pacific Northwest. Denver is considered Middle West by some and West by others. The West Coast is usually considered to be California. I would suggest you visit the West Coast and the PNW to see for yourself. Also Denver. They may not have the same problems as East Coast cities but they they certainly all have their problems.

California has pollution and Portland is getting there with its ever increasing traffic. Portland, Seattle and parts of California have a huge homeless problem many Eastern cities do not have.

Educate yourself on facts from actual reliable sources not from Social Media or TV shows.

The first thing you should do is look at some geography books.
Ummmm, Oregon and Washington are most definitely two states that are on the west coast. What, you think the west coast just magically ends at the border of CA and OR?
Look at a map in a geography book.
And every city has homelessness, crime, poverty, etc..
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Old 04-16-2016, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
1,723 posts, read 1,137,330 times
Reputation: 1293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Orange County is the epitome of the "West Coast dream" - near-perfect year-round weather, gorgeous coastal and inland scenery, lots of diversity, very physically attractive locals, a strong emphasis on healthy lifestyles, excellent career prospects in most fields, high-income, comfortable suburban layout, well-manicured streets and shopping centers, excellent shopping and other amenities, generally newer architecture and housing stock, generally friendly locals and manageable traffic (at least by LA standards).
Orange county may be your "epitome of the west coast dream". It sure isn't mine.
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Old 04-20-2016, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,648,620 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidamarink View Post
The West Coast cities have already been experiencing this for decades. Denver is now experiencing this (rising housing costs and overcrowdedness without fast enough developments to accommodate it). I think Minneapolis will be the next inland city to experience this. It's been gaining popularity fast, especially amongst broke hipsters. I won't be surprised if it becomes another unaffordable, overhyped city with a huge underclass of transients and $15/hr barista hipsters with children.

The difference between the East Coast rat race vs. the WC rat race is that on the East Coast, it's all tell it like it is, cut & clear, high strung. No one denies that there is a rat race out there, and they accept it. On the West Coast, you are expected to live by this zen calm demeanor and relaxed exterior. Topple that with the fake latte liberalism/"progressiveness" that everyone is supposed to have (especially in SF and Seattle), and the end result is a mirage. Yes, a mirage. A visitor can easily be fooled into thinking West Coast cities are relaxed, happy clouds to live on. But when you are trying to hold down a job out there and you read in between the lines, you will see that the competition is just as fierce as the East Coast. So in the end, you will be in a rat race regardless of which coast you're on. It's just a matter of how you want it served to you.
So very, very true. As the Red Queen said to Alice, “Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!”
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Old 04-20-2016, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Armsanta Sorad
5,660 posts, read 6,849,365 times
Reputation: 2440
The west coast is very expensive and a little over-regulated, at least in California.
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Old 04-20-2016, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
1,723 posts, read 1,137,330 times
Reputation: 1293
i don't feel over-regulated. What does that feel like?
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Old 04-20-2016, 10:38 PM
 
5,128 posts, read 5,839,163 times
Reputation: 8396
Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post

California is also magic. Want to make an 100+ salary, but live like someone who make 30k? Go to the Bay, you'd love the housing shortage, not being able to rent a place due to racist private renters (most of all who are Asian flat out say they'll only rent to asian tenants). Want to rent and apartment, with no amenities, and sometimes $5,000 deposits? Go to the Bay Area, where you'd be paying $2700 rent for a one bedroom apartment. Oh yeah, and I hope you love traffic and love driving, because despite the NYC level rents, it's in no way offset by good public transportation. Nope, the name of the game is SPRAWL. Want to buy a house, better hope you have $1.3 million in the bank at any given time. The only time you're going to see the inside of a house for under $4k a month is if you're renting a room for $1800 a month.

But uh, nice weather though, I guess that's something.
Well, that cracked me up.

Rather true though. I know of a couple who is THRILLED to have bought a house in Oakland for just under $700,000. It's a modest house from the 1940s in a neighborhood of quirky houses on small lots with deteriorating streets. They probably make around $300,000 between the two of them.

Where I live, that house as it stands, in the neighborhood it's in, could be had for less than $200,000 and the lot would be larger.

A $700,000 house here would be something large and gorgeous on a lake.
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