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Old 04-13-2016, 12:12 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,934 posts, read 7,589,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I think a lot of people are or would be shocked at how much little crappy 1950's/60's one-story ranchers under 1,500 sq ft cost in the Bay Area. That's probably what the average middle class person lives in too.
...that start at $1.2M and rapidly go up from there.

A metro that mostly consists of newer, bland homogeneous houses in suburbs that just go on and on is one that I'll gladly pass on thank you very much. Fortunately, just about every city has first and second ring "street car" suburbs, that, even if full of mostly similar structures, have taken on a patina of personalization and mature landscaping that makes for a far more interesting place.

I think inner Pittsburgh has some of the most architecturally interesting and beautiful houses extant, but those are in areas that predate WWII, Shadyside, Squirrel Hill etc...; there are plenty of scruffy and run-down areas there too, but even they hold a certain charm in my mind.

I'm not as familiar with outlying areas, other than "exploring" for fun on RE sites, and to be sure there are plenty of really crappy houses there as well as in just about every other metro, especially in the Northeast. But those are just parts of cities that never interest me to either visit or live in, so as long as a city has a core of excellent, historic/vintage housing stock and interesting neighborhoods that support them, I just blithely ignore the rest.

Even a place like Phoenix, the poster child of sprawl, with bland beige houses seemingly going on forever, has some great older neighborhoods around North Central.
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Old 04-13-2016, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,511 posts, read 2,968,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I ignored it because I was focusing on housing from the 50s-80s; the fraction of 100+ year old houses. My point is for most in the Northeast and some of the Midwest, people don't expect new housing, 50s-80s housing is "normal".
I'm not sure this is the case, either. At least in my area, I find most houses to be built prior to 1950. Indeed, the one I'm living in now was built in 1894. I'd actually argue that most people in the Northeast, at least around here in the Delaware Valley, if they're going the house route and not the apartment/condo route, do in fact expect either older housing or brand new housing in new developments far from the city core.
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Old 04-13-2016, 01:30 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
I'm not sure this is the case, either. At least in my area, I find most houses to be built prior to 1950. Indeed, the one I'm living in now was built in 1894. I'd actually argue that most people in the Northeast, at least around here in the Delaware Valley, if they're going the house route and not the apartment/condo route, do in fact expect either older housing or brand new housing in new developments far from the city core.
I was thinking of newer areas outside of towns and old cities. My current rental is about 100 years old, maybe older.

Housing stock age; Allegheny County PA [where Pittsburgh is]

pre-1950: 41%
1950-1990: 48%

Massachusetts:

pre-1950: 40%
1950-1990: 44%

My point was, even in outer suburban areas, in much of the Northeast, brand new homes are uncommon enough people don't expect them.
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Old 04-13-2016, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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Here in Indy, there is a lot of urban blight in the core neighborhoods, followed by many middle class ranches and suburbs out in the outer townships. Still, a lot of the blight is visible from the interstate and gives an unfavorable impression to passersby.
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Old 04-14-2016, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,824,419 times
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Pittsburgh has made me realize I like newer housing. I'm really tired of looking at old apartments built before 1980 with no amenities (and I mean no amenities) and possible shared utilities, no designated parking, no outdoor space and the landlords or rental companies asking ridiculous prices for rent. God, do I miss the Sunbelt apartment complexes!!!! Don't come to Pittsburgh looking for all the bells and whistles unless you are looking to pay over $1000 a month for rent on a 1br.
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Old 04-14-2016, 04:28 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Few in the Northeast expect new construction; there hasn't been enough growth. Older homes in nicer neighborhoods have often be redone or extended. You can find on say, the Boston forum the opposite perspective, people decrying "McMansions" in the burbs and preferring older suburban housing.
The difference between Boston and Pittsburgh is that Boston has the jobs. The job market in Pittsburgh is only average at best. It takes a lot of money to fix up an old home. People in Pittsburgh just aren't buying these old homes and remodeling. We have a few pocket neighborhoods of redevelopment but the rest are in decline.
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Old 04-14-2016, 04:38 AM
 
7,693 posts, read 4,551,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The difference between Boston and Pittsburgh is that Boston has the jobs. The job market in Pittsburgh is only average at best. It takes a lot of money to fix up an old home. People in Pittsburgh just aren't buying these old homes and remodeling. We have a few pocket neighborhoods of redevelopment but the rest are in decline.
Pittsburgh's unemployment rate is 4.6%. Houses in the East End are flying off the market in a week or less. New condos and luxury rentals are going up everywhere. You should come into the city limits some time. Yes, the city has a long way to go, but if you don't see improvement, you're not looking.

You remind me of Italian old-timers who thought Brooklyn was still in decline in the late 90s-early 2000s.
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Old 04-14-2016, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Here in Indy, there is a lot of urban blight in the core neighborhoods, followed by many middle class ranches and suburbs out in the outer townships. Still, a lot of the blight is visible from the interstate and gives an unfavorable impression to passersby.
Out of curiousity, what do you consider a blighted urban neighborhood in Indianapolis? I haven't seen much outside of the the area bounded by 70, 65, and the White River I'd call urban. Areas like this certainly look run down, but I find calling them urban a stretch.
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Old 04-14-2016, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,824,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Pittsburgh's unemployment rate is 4.6%. Houses in the East End are flying off the market in a week or less. New condos and luxury rentals are going up everywhere. You should come into the city limits some time. Yes, the city has a long way to go, but if you don't see improvement, you're not looking.

You remind me of Italian old-timers who thought Brooklyn was still in decline in the late 90s-early 2000s.
I am in the city of Pittsburgh every day. I live here.

A city can have low unemployment but that figure doesn't define the type of jobs. It is easy to count retail and hospitality positions as new jobs but they don't pay well.
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Fountain Square, Indianapolis
628 posts, read 758,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Sadly, I think distinctive housing styles for regions of the country are, functionally speaking, dead. Styles began normalizing nationwide roughly 100 years ago, when Craftsmen styles became common. By the 1960s, there were virtually no differences between local vernacular remaining. Today there seem to be only two housing styles - the faux Spanish stucco style, which is common in Florida, California, and the Southwest, and brick and/or vinyl sided McMansion, which is common everywhere else in the county.
I agree, it's sad really. That's the main reason I love the older cities.
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