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View Poll Results: What do you prefer?
A moderate or swing state 17 53.13%
State that leans heavily to the party of your choosing 15 46.88%
Voters: 32. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-18-2016, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boulevardofdef View Post
The state legislature is controlled by the Republicans, but I don't think you can call it a red state -- at this point it may even be a fairly safe blue state on the presidential level.
Historically all of northern New England was what they called "rock ribbed Republican." Vermont and to a lesser extent Maine tended to drift to the left as the national Republican party went right. New Hampshire didn't follow their lead primarily because of transplants from Massachusetts, who were seeking low taxes, and thus tended to be very Republican-leaning. By far the most Republican portions of New Hampshire are the suburban towns near the Massachusetts border. Most of western and northern New Hampshire is pretty left leaning now.


Last edited by eschaton; 04-18-2016 at 09:46 AM..
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Old 04-18-2016, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,572 posts, read 753,683 times
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In states where one party is more or less guaranteed to win, their elected officials often become more dogmatic and less responsive to alternate viewpoints. Additionally due to the structure of the electoral college, if there are priorities that are more important to the swing states vs. the strongly partisan states, it makes sense for presidential candidates to emphasize such issues. Fortunately for the nation, the swing states are not all clustered together - they include Colorado and Nevada in the West, Iowa and Ohio in the Midwest, Florida and Virginia in the South, and New Hampshire in the Northeast.

Georgia tends to virtually always choose Republicans in recent statewide elections, though by lower margins than many of the other red states. I've never lived in a competitive state (previously, ultra blue California and solid red Texas) so to some extent, I do envy those in the purple states for having more likelihood of their own votes making a difference.

I do think it's possible for the 50/50 locations not to be particularly moderate so much as polarized evenly between the two parties. Some counties in the Deep South that voted almost evenly for Obama and Romney in 2012 are good examples of this.
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Old 04-18-2016, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
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Well, Massachusetts loves them some dems. We also don't have happy hours. So there ya go.
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Old 04-18-2016, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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I should note that I wanted to talk about non-presidential elections. Presidents, even though they are important, do not have the biggest influence on our lives. That goes to the House and the Senate, and state elections. What eschaton mentioned about Pennsylvania even though they've always gone blue for presidents is exactly what I was looking for more or less.
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Old 04-18-2016, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Although Pennsylvania isn't a true swing state in the presidential sense (hasn't been won by a Republican for president since 1988, and is always a few percent more Democratic than the nation at large) in terms of local government it is very much down the middle, with divided government the norm. I'd argue in some ways it is more moderate than many other states. A lot of states (like say Wisconsin, for example) look moderate on paper, but are really almost evenly balanced between progressives and conservatives. In contrast, in Pennsylvania there are still remnants of the old political "machine" days, with conservative Democrats in the west of the state, and moderate to liberal Republicans in the east. This is slowly changing, but the minority factions remain strong enough that for example despite having four years of total Republican control between 2010 and 2014, there was very little that the Republican governor could do to get around more moderate Senate Republican leadership. Attempts to privatize the state liquor stores failed, along with a push to pass "right to work." We even got a gas tax increase (under a Republican!) to pay for improved roads and mass transit.

That said, in general, I think divided government is inferior. I think that it's better to let a party have total control of the government, so it can quickly pass its agenda, even if it's not something I like. The reason I say this is because the best way to prove your political rivals agenda doesn't work is to let them get into power and be failures at implementing it - let the people see the political reality and not just use the policy as a cheap talking point. Gridlock is incredibly overrated.
Thank you! I understand what you're saying about the gridlock.

I think that something I'm witnessing so far is that the two parties don't want to compromise anymore which would be a huge negative to the American people and in particular swing states. Compromising is key yet it seems to never happen.
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Old 04-18-2016, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I'm a populist, non-religious Republican and would feel more comfortable in a purple or libertarian leaning state.

I'm from Tennessee, and while there are things about the state I like, the extreme religious bent of the state Republican party bothers me. The economy there is in shambles, and the legislature just passed a bill to make the Bible the official state book. While the Republican governor vetoed it, all it takes is a simple majority to override that veto, so the Bible is likely to be the state book shortly. There are far, far more useful things the legislature ought to be working on.

I live in Indiana now and we have much the same religious bent at the state level. Still, I don't think the average person on the street is as conservative as in TN, and the state/local governments are relatively high tax for a "conservative" state. At least TN walks the talk on the tax issue.

I've lived in SC well for a little bit and it certainly doesn't seem as socially backward as IN/TN. I also lived in IA back in the 2012 election and it was the only truly moderate place I've lived, but I didn't like it for personal reasons.
The West sounds better for you, as long as you don't relocate to a very LDS community. Mormons are a big part of the West but as long as you aren't in Utah (outside of SLC proper) or Gilbert, Arizona you'll be fine.
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Old 04-18-2016, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,660,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
In states where one party is more or less guaranteed to win, their elected officials often become more dogmatic and less responsive to alternate viewpoints. Additionally due to the structure of the electoral college, if there are priorities that are more important to the swing states vs. the strongly partisan states, it makes sense for presidential candidates to emphasize such issues. Fortunately for the nation, the swing states are not all clustered together - they include Colorado and Nevada in the West, Iowa and Ohio in the Midwest, Florida and Virginia in the South, and New Hampshire in the Northeast.

Georgia tends to virtually always choose Republicans in recent statewide elections, though by lower margins than many of the other red states. I've never lived in a competitive state (previously, ultra blue California and solid red Texas) so to some extent, I do envy those in the purple states for having more likelihood of their own votes making a difference.

I do think it's possible for the 50/50 locations not to be particularly moderate so much as polarized evenly between the two parties. Some counties in the Deep South that voted almost evenly for Obama and Romney in 2012 are good examples of this.
This is exactly what I think as well. Here the Republicans have gone from right to extreme right. Like Arpaio. And some of our republicans like McCain have held office for so long... Sometimes it's good to get a fresh brain in office.

they could be polarized rather than truly moderate. I suspect Florida would be one of these, with democratic Miami and republican northern Florida.
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Old 04-18-2016, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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Ohio is almost split 50, 50 in terms of how it voted for the past Presidential election and is typically regarded as a swing-state but it has a Republican dominated state legislature where the Democrats are virtually powerless. That being said it's main cities tend to have Democratic local government. So it's kind of a purple state, with a red state government and a blue capital city.
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Old 04-18-2016, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,660,529 times
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Surprised to see that a lot of people prefer moderate states like I do.

Do you guys share the same perspective as me? I feel like the majority of people in this country can at least identify as more Democratic or more Republican, even if not in every box that can be checked, and would rather see their party succeed to see the policies that they desire. Eschaton mentioned it with the grid lock.

Is there anything else I don't know? Other view points or..?
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Old 04-18-2016, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,660,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
Well, Massachusetts loves them some dems. We also don't have happy hours. So there ya go.
I don't want to know what life is like without happy hour.
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