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View Poll Results: What do you prefer?
A moderate or swing state 17 53.13%
State that leans heavily to the party of your choosing 15 46.88%
Voters: 32. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-17-2016, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,639,169 times
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I thought I would make a thread comparing general status quo between what we would declare a "moderate" state and one that clearly leans to one party. What would you say are the pros and cons to living in a moderate state versus a state that is heavily democratic or republican?

I don't want this thread to turn into political bashing of one party versus another. I want it just to compare what having the two parties more or less equally balanced in the state does for or against the state in contrast to the opposite.

I'd also like to talk about the factors that create this. Is it demographics that create political moderation? Some states like Ohio and Florida have been swing states for a while now it seems. Why is it that way for them? And why is it these states and not some of the other ones?
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Old 04-17-2016, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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I forgot to put my thoughts on this.

I think I might lean in favor of a swing state at this point. I have lived in a state that leans Republican and always has. I'm sure the Arizona Republican Party is well aware of that and has thus "relaxed" I guess I could try to say on winning the hearts of the people. They know that a candidate that has an "R" next to their name will get elected in contrast to a "D" candidate.

I also think it discourages those with other political views from even trying to vote. To me in a perfect democracy everyone would be politically engaged (at least at 18 on when they can vote) and vote in their eyes what is best. I think it would work better for everyone if this was the case.

Maybe I'm the only one who views it that way because I'm a political moderate myself. I tend to agree with the right on some things and with the left on other things. Though I feel like I lean left nowadays. What do you guys think? I'd love to hear a contrasting opinion.
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Old 04-17-2016, 10:04 PM
 
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I've spent little time in swing states, exception being New Hampshire for about a year a few years ago, though it wasn't during an election year and it still seemed to lean heavily towards one party. On the American political spectrum, I have extreme views on both ends, so I am moderate in a sense with few actually moderate views.

Based on stereotypes (I know, not the best, but since I have very little experience), I would prefer to live in a non-swing state, regardless of which party it leans to. I've spent considerable amount of time (>1 year cumulatively) in states that heavily lean towards opposite ends (California, Georgia, Louisiana, Washington, Texas, where I lived most my life) and, for the most part, they are very similar. Yes, some states are friendlier and more tolerant or such, but, overall, it seems to have no correlation with what party the state leans towards (Washington, Louisiana, and Texas were full of friendly people, Georgia and California less so, but ONLY in my personal experience).

Anyway, the reason I pick non-swing states is because I always hear about how crazy swing states get during election years, in a largely negative sense. I would prefer to avoid that.
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Old 04-17-2016, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,639,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
I've spent little time in swing states, exception being New Hampshire for about a year a few years ago, though it wasn't during an election year and it still seemed to lean heavily towards one party. On the American political spectrum, I have extreme views on both ends, so I am moderate in a sense with few actually moderate views.

Based on stereotypes (I know, not the best, but since I have very little experience), I would prefer to live in a non-swing state, regardless of which party it leans to. I've spent considerable amount of time (>1 year cumulatively) in states that heavily lean towards opposite ends (California, Georgia, Louisiana, Washington, Texas, where I lived most my life) and, for the most part, they are very similar. Yes, some states are friendlier and more tolerant or such, but, overall, it seems to have no correlation with what party the state leans towards (Washington, Louisiana, and Texas were full of friendly people, Georgia and California less so, but ONLY in my personal experience).

Anyway, the reason I pick non-swing states is because I always hear about how crazy swing states get during election years, in a largely negative sense. I would prefer to avoid that.
Thank you for your reply.

I would say New Hampshire is a pretty red state. The state seems to be the epitome of libertarian in the modern sense (or it's tied with Nevada), which is why the Libertarian Party picked them for the Free State Project. If the libertarians don't vote for their own party I strongly believe they would vote red before blue. Libertarians are a big part of the population in Arizona and from my eyes they seem to prioritize economic freedoms over social freedoms at this time, even though both are important to the true libertarian.

Yes tolerance I think has more to do with someone's upbringing and local culture. Louisiana also had some of the friendliest people I have ever met and I would agree with that, just like I would also agree that California wasn't the friendliest place to me either.

I haven't heard anything about the negative parts of the election process in swing states. Can you explain it to me?
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Old 04-17-2016, 11:05 PM
 
1,829 posts, read 1,251,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
Thank you for your reply.

I would say New Hampshire is a pretty red state. The state seems to be the epitome of libertarian in the modern sense (or it's tied with Nevada), which is why the Libertarian Party picked them for the Free State Project. If the libertarians don't vote for their own party I strongly believe they would vote red before blue. Libertarians are a big part of the population in Arizona and from my eyes they seem to prioritize economic freedoms over social freedoms at this time, even though both are important to the true libertarian.

Yes tolerance I think has more to do with someone's upbringing and local culture. Louisiana also had some of the friendliest people I have ever met and I would agree with that, just like I would also agree that California wasn't the friendliest place to me either.

I haven't heard anything about the negative parts of the election process in swing states. Can you explain it to me?
You're welcome. You're very polite.

Well, I was in Manchester, New Hampshire, which seemed pretty Democratic, despite having a Republican mayor, if I remember correctly. It was rather confusing. But, yes, I entirely know what you mean about New Hampshire. According to the friend I stayed with, assuming he was right, even said New Hampshire was one of few states, if not the only, not requiring adults in the front to wear seat belts.

Perhaps I was a bit harsh when describing swing states. What I mean is, people often seem to talk about how they are bombarded with advertisements during presidential election years, so much so that it has become a meme. I'm not particularly a fan of advertisements, especially political ones that are obviously slanted in favor to politician x, z, or y. I may be wrong, so feel free to enlighten me, as I know stereotypes are far from the best source to form opinions.
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Old 04-17-2016, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,639,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
You're welcome. You're very polite.

Well, I was in Manchester, New Hampshire, which seemed pretty Democratic, despite having a Republican mayor, if I remember correctly. It was rather confusing. But, yes, I entirely know what you mean about New Hampshire. According to the friend I stayed with, assuming he was right, even said New Hampshire was one of few states, if not the only, not requiring adults in the front to wear seat belts.

Perhaps I was a bit harsh when describing swing states. What I mean is, people often seem to talk about how they are bombarded with advertisements during presidential election years, so much so that it has become a meme. I'm not particularly a fan of advertisements, especially political ones that are obviously slanted in favor to politician x, z, or y. I may be wrong, so feel free to enlighten me, as I know stereotypes are far from the best source to form opinions.
I didn't think your reply was harsh.

Yeah, the advertisements would get annoying, I could see that. In Arizona that only happens in the presidential elections. My parents are both life-long registered Republicans and they kept getting calls to vote for Cruz.
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Old 04-18-2016, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Although Pennsylvania isn't a true swing state in the presidential sense (hasn't been won by a Republican for president since 1988, and is always a few percent more Democratic than the nation at large) in terms of local government it is very much down the middle, with divided government the norm. I'd argue in some ways it is more moderate than many other states. A lot of states (like say Wisconsin, for example) look moderate on paper, but are really almost evenly balanced between progressives and conservatives. In contrast, in Pennsylvania there are still remnants of the old political "machine" days, with conservative Democrats in the west of the state, and moderate to liberal Republicans in the east. This is slowly changing, but the minority factions remain strong enough that for example despite having four years of total Republican control between 2010 and 2014, there was very little that the Republican governor could do to get around more moderate Senate Republican leadership. Attempts to privatize the state liquor stores failed, along with a push to pass "right to work." We even got a gas tax increase (under a Republican!) to pay for improved roads and mass transit.

That said, in general, I think divided government is inferior. I think that it's better to let a party have total control of the government, so it can quickly pass its agenda, even if it's not something I like. The reason I say this is because the best way to prove your political rivals agenda doesn't work is to let them get into power and be failures at implementing it - let the people see the political reality and not just use the policy as a cheap talking point. Gridlock is incredibly overrated.
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Old 04-18-2016, 07:49 AM
 
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I'm an Independent Conservative and can live about any place and be happy, no matter the political leanings. As long as the area has a good church for my wife and me to attend and the area isn't hostile towards those of different beliefs, I can do fine anywhere.
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,580 posts, read 17,553,447 times
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I'm a populist, non-religious Republican and would feel more comfortable in a purple or libertarian leaning state.

I'm from Tennessee, and while there are things about the state I like, the extreme religious bent of the state Republican party bothers me. The economy there is in shambles, and the legislature just passed a bill to make the Bible the official state book. While the Republican governor vetoed it, all it takes is a simple majority to override that veto, so the Bible is likely to be the state book shortly. There are far, far more useful things the legislature ought to be working on.

I live in Indiana now and we have much the same religious bent at the state level. Still, I don't think the average person on the street is as conservative as in TN, and the state/local governments are relatively high tax for a "conservative" state. At least TN walks the talk on the tax issue.

I've lived in SC well for a little bit and it certainly doesn't seem as socially backward as IN/TN. I also lived in IA back in the 2012 election and it was the only truly moderate place I've lived, but I didn't like it for personal reasons.
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:33 AM
 
1,586 posts, read 1,539,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
I would say New Hampshire is a pretty red state. The state seems to be the epitome of libertarian in the modern sense (or it's tied with Nevada), which is why the Libertarian Party picked them for the Free State Project. If the libertarians don't vote for their own party I strongly believe they would vote red before blue.
While New Hampshire has a famously libertarian bent, it's also voted for the Democrats in the last three presidential elections, including 2004, when the Republicans won nationally. It currently has a Democratic governor, and its congressional delegation is 50/50, with one Democrat and one Republican in both the House and the Senate. The one Republican Senator, Kelly Ayotte, is considered a candidate to be picked off by the Democrats in 2016, though she's currently ahead in polls.

The state legislature is controlled by the Republicans, but I don't think you can call it a red state -- at this point it may even be a fairly safe blue state on the presidential level.
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