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Old 04-18-2016, 01:41 AM
 
972 posts, read 739,712 times
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So where does the Pacific Northwest start and stop? Does it start in Alaska and come all the way down threw Canada into Northern California? All the way east into Idaho? Explain. Then once we come up with a common consensus for the boundaries of the Pacific Northwest let's talk about the Northwest's population! Thanks for your replies in advance!
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Old 04-18-2016, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Seattle
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There is no official map but from my perspective it stretches from southeast Alaska to northern California. Then extends into western montana and idaho. Google Cascadia
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Old 04-21-2016, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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There isn't going to be a common consensus. The phrase "Pacific Northwest" has different meanings in different contexts.

What are you actually interested in?
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Old 04-21-2016, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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It starts in Iowa and ends somewhere down in Arkansas. It's a bit of a fluid region, frankly.
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Old 04-21-2016, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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This is kind of a no-brainer.

Washington and Western Oregon are the center, the rest of Oregon would be a sub-center, and additional areas include Northern Idaho. That's it.

However, there are other areas that have similar traits to the PNW but are kind of out-layers. In this discussion, I would include the central panhandle of Idaho (Lewiston/Clarkston), and the Boise MSA. Perhaps as a stretch far northern CA, and far western Montana and in an even further stretch, might include the Alaska southeast section.
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Old 04-21-2016, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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In my eyes I view it as far north as Glacier Bay National Park in SE Alaska (very north border would be Mt. Fairweather), all the way down the coast through Juneau, Sitka, Ketchikan, Vancouver and to Seattle, and down to Portland as far as maybe Medford. The Eastern border would be things like Mt. Baker, Mt. Hood, Mt. Rainier, Crater Lake, etc.

I've always associated things like Bend, Spokane, etc. as Intermountain West. Maybe because to me when I think of PNW I think greenery, giant snowcapped peaks, and lots of rain. That fits almost all of SE Alaska (literally all of SE Alaska is giant snowcapped peaks on tiny islands with some pine trees thrown in there, with even more rain than Seattle), and roughly the western halves of Oregon and Washington only. And then some of British Columbia.
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Old 04-21-2016, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
In my eyes I view it as far north as Glacier Bay National Park in SE Alaska (very north border would be Mt. Fairweather), all the way down the coast through Juneau, Sitka, Ketchikan, Vancouver and to Seattle, and down to Portland as far as maybe Medford. The Eastern border would be things like Mt. Baker, Mt. Hood, Mt. Rainier, Crater Lake, etc.

I've always associated things like Bend, Spokane, etc. as Intermountain West. Maybe because to me when I think of PNW I think greenery, giant snowcapped peaks, and lots of rain. That fits almost all of SE Alaska (literally all of SE Alaska is giant snowcapped peaks on tiny islands with some pine trees thrown in there, with even more rain than Seattle), and roughly the western halves of Oregon and Washington only. And then some of British Columbia.
Agreed, but Spokane is very green with tall firs starting 25 miles west and in abundance through the South Hill of Spokane, and still prominent in the Spokane metro. This only increases into the Northern Idaho panhandle.
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Old 04-21-2016, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Agreed, but Spokane is very green with tall firs starting 25 miles west and in abundance through the South Hill of Spokane, and still prominent in the Spokane metro. This only increases into the Northern Idaho panhandle.
Yeah but there's that area of brownness separating it. I mean with my definition it's a very clear boundary. You can literally see somewhere after Mt. Hood and stuff where it goes from a dark green to a tannish color (not as tan as Arizona but still) when looking from satellite. It's more noticeable in Oregon but still pretty clear in Washington.

I don't think firs qualify IMO. I mean Flagstaff has firs too but...
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Old 04-21-2016, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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Well I was always taught in school that the PNW was WA, OR, and ID and sometimes AK. Though I think it's closely associated with Cascadia and this map defines it as the watersheds of rivers flowing into the Pacific.

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Old 04-22-2016, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Brew City
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In ten years living in Western Montana, I never considered it the PNW. I don't recall anyone ever referring to the region by that either. Montana and Idaho are both Northern Rockies. I considered it more closely related to Wyoming and Colorado than Washington or Oregon.

I agree with a pp, SE Alaska, Western Canada Western WA, Western OR and Northern CA. Where it's really green on a map. Not extending across Eastern Washington and Oregon.
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