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View Poll Results: What do you prefer?
Dry and cold 25 69.44%
Humid and cold 11 30.56%
Voters: 36. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-19-2016, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
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Wind speed has more of an effect on how cold a place feels than does humidity, especially at temperatures below freezing.
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Old 04-19-2016, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,266 posts, read 3,248,048 times
Reputation: 3697
Default Dry cold vs. Humid cold

Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Wind speed has more of an effect on how cold a place feels than does humidity, especially at temperatures below freezing.


Bingo!!!
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Old 04-19-2016, 10:51 AM
 
6,968 posts, read 14,095,559 times
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Dry cold makes me get nosebleeds, so I choose humid.
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Old 04-19-2016, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Chotchkie's
216 posts, read 128,366 times
Reputation: 736
I find humid + cold noticeably more uncomfortable than dry + cold. Kind of how a humid 90 degree day feels more uncomfortable than a 90 degree day with 10% humidity.
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Old 04-19-2016, 01:15 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,735,931 times
Reputation: 30796
Relative humidity. It's a thing.
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Old 04-19-2016, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,320 posts, read 21,890,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Relative humidity. It's a thing.

true which is what people should refer to, or even more so; "dew point" rather than saying "humidity" and reveal they don't know what they are talking about
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Old 04-19-2016, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
679 posts, read 464,289 times
Reputation: 938
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkozlow3 View Post
No, it's not a myth at all. If you truly believe that, you have never lived in both a dry cold AND a humid cold climate.

I live in Colorado (very DRY cold). On a cloudy day (taking "sun" out of the equation), I'll take a 10 degree day in Colorado over a 30 degree day on the East coast. No contest. I've spent plenty of time living in the East coast and I frequently hop on a plane in the middle of winter to travel East for business trips. Dry cold is much more tolerable for many people.
Not all of the E Coast is humid cold. New England is usually very dry in the Winter, as the air comes mostly from Canada
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Old 04-19-2016, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,379 posts, read 1,195,619 times
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As a Minnesotan, dry cold absolutely. Humid cold slices right through you, all the way to the bone.
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Old 04-19-2016, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,642,493 times
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Arizona has many cloudy days that aren't humid at all. And humid places in the country have very sunny days as well. Im sure a Minnesotan summer or winter still sees the sun, and it will still be humid there. So get out of here with that logic.
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Old 04-19-2016, 08:07 PM
 
6,968 posts, read 14,095,559 times
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100+ with or without humidity is still hot. One's an oven, the other a sauna. Either way, it's hot. Around 80-95 is generally where I can tell the biggest difference with humid or dry weather. I've never done a full winter a dry cold place like Denver, only here in Louisville and visiting Chicago. But I'm assuming when it's around 0, you really won't tell much if it's dry or humid. Either way, it's damn cold! The only time you can tell a huge difference is with the stronger winds. 25 with sun and no wind, IMO, feels much better than 35-40 with clouds and wind.
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