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View Poll Results: What do you prefer?
Dry and cold 25 69.44%
Humid and cold 11 30.56%
Voters: 36. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-21-2016, 10:22 PM
 
Location: District of Columbia
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As an east coast native Minneapolis is definitely cold in the winter, but humid its not. The Twin Cities are pretty dry in the winter, esp compared to back home.
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Old 04-21-2016, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,640,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandlapper View Post
As an east coast native Minneapolis is definitely cold in the winter, but humid its not. The Twin Cities are pretty dry in the winter, esp compared to back home.
So it's more humid in the summer? That's interesting, kind of surprises me with the snow and all that you're known for.

Is the rest of the midwest like this? I thought the humidity was relatively regular in all of the seasons over there. I know Arizona sees a peak of humidity (monsoon season, reaches about 60% humidity or so) in August.
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Old 04-22-2016, 05:17 AM
 
12,843 posts, read 4,645,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
So it's more humid in the summer? That's interesting, kind of surprises me with the snow and all that you're known for.

Is the rest of the midwest like this? I thought the humidity was relatively regular in all of the seasons over there. I know Arizona sees a peak of humidity (monsoon season, reaches about 60% humidity or so) in August.
How can the air be humid when its way below freezing? The ability of the air to carry humidity depends on the temperature, so hot air can carry far more humidity than cold air. Frigid air can't carry any humidity to speak of.
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Old 04-22-2016, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,500 posts, read 1,352,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PCALMike View Post
How can the air be humid when its way below freezing? The ability of the air to carry humidity depends on the temperature, so hot air can carry far more humidity than cold air. Frigid air can't carry any humidity to speak of.
Exactly! Humidity is really only a factor when the temperature is near freezing or just above, and even then it's not a huge factor in how cold it feels, it's more likely the wind you feel, not the humidity levels.
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Old 04-22-2016, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,286,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Yet in Denver the lows drop into the teens which is lower than much of the Midwest, certainly than other areas in its same latitude. You're also dealing with heavy snow well into April and sometimes May. This isn't nearly as common in the Midwest, even the upper Midwest.
Since I live in Denver, and grew up in KC, I'll say that Denver winters are generally more pleasant than KC winters. Average daily highs are higher in Denver, and with lower humidity, it feels warmer. I've gone to KC in winter and temps in the low 30s felt more like low teens to me.

And while Denver gets later dumps of snow, it's not as if there is snow on the ground for months at a time. The heavy spring snows we had this year (most likely due to El Nino) came and went fast. It's 78 and sunny today (we had around 10" last weekend) and I mowed the lawn in shorts last evening.

I think KC is much nicer in April (and sometimes early May) overall than Denver, but we are about to have months of beautiful weather where you don't sweat like a pig and swat mosquitoes of you step outside. KC (and really, anywhere east of Colorado) is about to become miserable for several months.
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Old 04-22-2016, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,286,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Exactly! Humidity is really only a factor when the temperature is near freezing or just above, and even then it's not a huge factor in how cold it feels, it's more likely the wind you feel, not the humidity levels.
Then it could be more about lower dew points. I can tell you, the 1st time I ever came to Denver was in January (coming from Kansas City) and it just felt better, even after dark, than KC did in January.
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Old 04-22-2016, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
5,616 posts, read 3,940,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PCALMike View Post
How can the air be humid when its way below freezing? The ability of the air to carry humidity depends on the temperature, so hot air can carry far more humidity than cold air. Frigid air can't carry any humidity to speak of.
Wrong. Most of the time in winter, humidity is close to 100%, which is a lot higher than the summer. What youre failing to see is that the dew point is down in winter, compared to summer.
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Old 04-22-2016, 07:29 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,735,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
true which is what people should refer to, or even more so; "dew point" rather than saying "humidity" and reveal they don't know what they are talking about
Exactly, there is no such thing as a humid 20 degree day.
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Old 04-23-2016, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,758 posts, read 36,160,327 times
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For winter, I prefer humid and chilly over dry and cold or humid and cold. I prefer my low temps in winter to get no lower than about 35 with daytime highs in the 40s and 50s.
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Old 04-23-2016, 11:13 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,485 posts, read 14,320,905 times
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Put it like this, I prefer 32F or below with a light snow over 36F and a chilling rainfall. Some areas are much more prone to one type of winter over the other and I find a wet cold to be much more uncomfortable.
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