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Old 04-23-2016, 02:05 AM
 
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Have you considered Johnson City and Asheville?
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Old 04-23-2016, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,515 posts, read 7,456,802 times
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Originally Posted by :-D View Post
Colorado is probably the best Western state for four seasons. It's major metro, Denver, gets mild winters. Other states out West that get noticeable and good quality four seasons (like an actual autumn and snowfall) get a lot of snow and have more temperature extremes. Places like Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, and eastern Oregon and Washington. Seattle and Portland are so temperate, along with California, that they don't really see the four seasons. Most of Nevada, Utah (SLC might be a good option to look into for you actually), and Arizona are too hot to see that. New Mexico is borderline, with winters being almost "too" mild, though it exists there.

You could also look into the northern parts of the South, like North Carolina and Kentucky maybe, they sound like they would have a more "balanced" 4 season climate. They aren't as brutal as Alabama or Louisiana but they aren't as cold as Michigan. Of course, that's just a guess.


I live in Tennessee, and I agree the weather here in the Upper South is mild and easy to deal with. We do have a hot and humid season that some complain about, but as you said its not like what the Gulf coast deals with. Our "winter" is a cool season with average highs in the upper 40s to low 50s. We get on average 6 inches of snow a year. In the Upper Midwest they call that October, but here its winter. Even in winter there are more than a few sunny days in the 60s, but that kind of weather comes and goes in Jan and Feb. I guess this is why so many people are moving here from places like Wisconsin and Michigan, as well as from Florida. No one likes extreme weather.
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Old 04-23-2016, 04:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I live in Tennessee, and I agree the weather here in the Upper South is mild and easy to deal with. We do have a hot and humid season that some complain about, but as you said its not like what the Gulf coast deals with. Our "winter" is a cool season with average highs in the upper 40s to low 50s. We get on average 6 inches of snow a year. In the Upper Midwest they call that October, but here its winter. Even in winter there are more than a few sunny days in the 60s, but that kind of weather comes and goes in Jan and Feb. I guess this is why so many people are moving here from places like Wisconsin and Michigan, as well as from Florida. No one likes extreme weather.
Are you currently residing in Johnson City?
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Old 04-23-2016, 06:40 AM
 
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Generally anywhere in the eastern part of the Midwest, where there is more rain seems to fit my idea of a good and balanced four-season climate. On the East Coast, somewhere in the lower Northeast like Trenton seems to fit the bill.
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Old 04-23-2016, 01:04 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,464 posts, read 14,307,686 times
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Originally Posted by PCALMike View Post
Are you currently residing in Johnson City?
I am next to JC, at a little higher elevation than the area Daniel seems to be in. That elevation usually gives us just a little bit cooler weather and lower dew points year round, a few degrees may not sound like much but IMO it makes a difference comfort wise.
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Old 04-23-2016, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Northern CA
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Based on your weather season requirement alone, Northern California below 3,000 feet elevation would get you 4 seasons without snow. Your winters are almost always above freezing and you have a handful of days (maybe a week) that are above 100 degrees. Move to 3-4,000 feet and you would add snow although it's not deep like further north and you would miss having any 100+ degree days.

Last edited by CAHntr; 04-23-2016 at 05:55 PM..
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Old 04-23-2016, 05:57 PM
 
Location: IN
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Anywhere on the immediate West Coast if you prefer to avoid extremes in seasonal temperature fluctuations. The nice thing is you can choose whether you want extreme sun, or less sun.
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Old 04-23-2016, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,637,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAHntr View Post
Based on your weather season requirement alone, Northern California below 3,000 feet elevation would get you 4 seasons without snow. Your winters are almost always above freezing and you have a handful of days (maybe a week) that are above 100 degrees. Move to 3-4,000 feet and you would add snow although it's not deep like further north and you would miss having any 100+ degree days.
Yeah because anybody would miss triple digit days, lol.
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Old 04-23-2016, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,515 posts, read 7,456,802 times
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Originally Posted by PCALMike View Post
Are you currently residing in Johnson City?


No I am further west in the Knoxville area. It is pretty up there in Johnson City though.
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Old 04-23-2016, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,515 posts, read 7,456,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
I am next to JC, at a little higher elevation than the area Daniel seems to be in. That elevation usually gives us just a little bit cooler weather and lower dew points year round, a few degrees may not sound like much but IMO it makes a difference comfort wise.


Not sure what the elevation is at JC but I notice the increased snow and a bit more cold over there than we get. Here in east TN elevation is everything when it comes to weather. The plateau gets more snow and cold too for the same reason. Most places are over 2000 feet up there. I know my elevation is 900 feet here. I am definitely in the valley.
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