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Old 04-30-2016, 11:10 AM
 
29,943 posts, read 27,375,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
looks like NC and VA were more deep south than SC
And FL and TN.
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Old 04-30-2016, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
763 posts, read 222,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
And FL and TN.
Keep in mind this map is from 1968, Florida has experienced the greatest change in the south since that time but this does show to what extent the deep south extended into Florida.
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Old 04-30-2016, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelNick View Post
FYI....North Carolina definitely touches the ocean.

There are parts of NC; especially Eastern NC, that could easily be mistaken for being in Alabama or Mississippi.

I think the real cultural distinction in the south (and I know it's by far the strongest distinction in the state of NC) is "Appalachia" vs "Piedmont" vs "Coastal Plain". Some southern states have all three represented pretty well (VA, NC, SC, GA), some are dominated by Appalachia/Piedmont (WV, KY, TN, AK), some are dominated by Coastal Plain ( MS, AL, FL, LA, East TX). Culturally the distinctions lie more with those geographic distinctions more-so than state boundaries.
Totally agree with you!!!
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Old 04-30-2016, 05:01 PM
 
Location: USA
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In the Deep South I would put my money on Baton Rouge for sure. Growth has been phenomenal there, likewise its economy.
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Old 04-30-2016, 08:12 PM
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Location: Miami
2,144 posts, read 1,521,186 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelNick View Post
I think the real cultural distinction in the south (and I know it's by far the strongest distinction in the state of NC) is "Appalachia" vs "Piedmont" vs "Coastal Plain". Some southern states have all three represented pretty well (VA, NC, SC, GA), some are dominated by Appalachia/Piedmont (WV, KY, TN, AK), some are dominated by Coastal Plain ( MS, AL, FL, LA, East TX). Culturally the distinctions lie more with those geographic distinctions more-so than state boundaries.
Agree, but Alabama isn't mostly dominated by Coastal Plain, Birmingham is probably the most hilliest major city in the South.
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Old 04-30-2016, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,060,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy64 View Post
Here is map of the 1968 election by county. Anything in deep red is the deep south. Granted the south has come a long way since those days but this is really good data for this discussion.
Funny. Regardless, as I've said before, the Deep South barely reaches in Texas. If we use this map, this shows exactly that. Side note: Interesting how the percentage for this candidate in 1968 changes once you cross Maryland into Pennsylvania.
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Old 04-30-2016, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Buffalo, NY
44 posts, read 31,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATUMRE75 View Post
You are 100% wrong! Tennessee is quintessentially deep south through and through.
No Tennessee is not Deep South. It is a southern state no doubt but it is not far down enough to be considered "Deep South".
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Old 04-30-2016, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Side note: Interesting how the percentage for this candidate in 1968 changes once you cross Maryland into Pennsylvania.
I noticed that myself. That is the original Mason Dixon line and it is somewhat glaring on this map. I don't think you would see that in today's Maryland and no way in Delaware. This was obviously the very last vestiges of the old south in those states.
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Old 04-30-2016, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPreskop View Post
No Tennessee is not Deep South. It is a southern state no doubt but it is not far down enough to be considered "Deep South".
Culturally the western 1/4 of Tennessee is in the deep south. You are getting into the Mississippi Delta and cotton country. My Dad is from a farm right outside Dyersburg TN, my relatives in that area consider themselves to be apart of the deep south.
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Old 04-30-2016, 08:51 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,160,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Funny. Regardless, as I've said before, the Deep South barely reaches in Texas. If we use this map, this shows exactly that. Side note: Interesting how the percentage for this candidate in 1968 changes once you cross Maryland into Pennsylvania.
If you go by that map, it makes Arkansas and North Carolina more Deep South than South Carolina.

Southeast Texas is undeniably the Deep South, as far as I'm concerned; right along with the rest of the central Gulf Coast.
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