U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-24-2016, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,514,854 times
Reputation: 1861

Advertisements

I'd rather move to a conservative place and be a small part of the change. The south has always been the last to progress. Unfortunately the south has some of Americas best weather. Just gotta move to the climate you are happy in and be a part of the progressive movement if you don't like how socially conservative a place is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-24-2016, 01:55 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,822,626 times
Reputation: 11141
I am trying to read between the lines and understand this thread. Is the premise that it's okay to be socially regressive and move in the opposite direction of the main culture?....and that this regressive culture will not do damage to a particular economy? If that's the premise then I think that the answer is "it depends". I say that because economies are different and their success depends on attracting and retaining particular talent vis-a-vis their industry and their industry's context and competitive cities.
Let's take the technology industry as an example. By far, the leading center of the American technology industry is the San Francisco Bay area. So, the technology industry operates and thrives in a very liberal environment that is successful in attracting and retaining talent globally. In a open and accepting culture, each person who comes their finds it easy to feel accepted. While the latest issues have revolved around trans issues, the culture that accepts them also accepts people of different national origins, religions, races, etc. Boston, another liberal city, has successfully emulated this model though it's unfair to say that they copied the SFBay model. It should come as no surprise then that other emerging tech spots have common threads with the areas that lead the industry in the US. Should local or statewide laws move in the opposite direction of the culture in which the industry thrives, they will likely have long term impacts on the health of the industry in that jurisdiction.
Industries like oil, which have sprung from a different culture and whose workforce has a different context and set of expectations would be less likely to be impacted by policies and laws that are tied to social conservatism.
In the end, I also think that the larger a city/metro gets, the less impactful social laws are to it because the culture moves organically with or without actual policy in place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2016, 03:28 PM
 
512 posts, read 377,745 times
Reputation: 444
My position is that political issues like the bathroom one, don't weigh too heavily on the scales. My reasons are

1. Politics almost inherently is divisive
People never unite around "progressivism", "conservatism", etc. As a matter of fact, just recently even Bernie Sanders just lost NY which is one of the most liberal and diverse states in the whole of the country. So when people make a big fuss that the "people" are all against something because it isn't progressive, I doubt it.

2. Social policy can be ignored
Take the bathroom law that just passed. If you are not transgender (which is most people), then it does not affect you. It may anger you, but many people will forget about it. People already knew that TX was not progressive when they moved. They already know that abortion is practically illegal, they know about Texas. But just like you meet people in the real world, you still have to talk to people. Unless all of your friends are diehard progressives, you already have some friends who are conservative and you put up with it. Most people would find it somewhat distasteful if people started literally discriminating against conservatives. So to some degree you have to put up with different social views all of the time anyway.

3. Economics rules
Jobs and cheap housing (the main reason people move to TX) cannot be ignored. If you cannot put food on the table and a roof over your head, that is a greater and more universal need. Even in politics as Bill Clinton said, "It's the economy stupid." Economic issues are always at the top.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2016, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,785,378 times
Reputation: 8809
Social factors play a huge role in my choices. I think it depends on what you hold dear to you more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2016, 02:07 PM
 
3,630 posts, read 1,543,876 times
Reputation: 3039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
I'd rather move to a conservative place and be a small part of the change. The south has always been the last to progress. Unfortunately the south has some of Americas best weather. Just gotta move to the climate you are happy in and be a part of the progressive movement if you don't like how socially conservative a place is.
Hmmm. Interesting. So some of you come here to civilize......opps, I mean "change" us. Ok, what do you mean? I grew up in a 50/50 black/white lower-middle class neighborhood in the late 60's-70's in a suburb of Charlotte, NC. We rarely ever talked about race. We just got along great! I worked with people who were from major metros up north who said they'd never mingled with a black person until they got into the military or college. That would be unheard of here. Before the mid 1960's, yes, there were horrible racial relations in the South. But there was just as much racism elsewhere in the nation, just without as much of the violence. So your "South has ALWAYS been the last to 'progress'" remark is misleading and generally inaccurate. Those in other parts of the nation kept their racism nicely hidden under a mask of piety. Sammy Davis, Jr. couldn't even stay in many of the hotels outside the South that his Rat Pack brothers could stay in due to this race. But everyone conveniently forgets that........When the racist kid shot the black church members in Charleston SC last year, did we riot, lute, and fight each other like areas outside of the South did when similar events happened? No! We all (all races) banded together and supported one another. When the Black Panthers, Al Sharpton, and KKK wanted to come and take advantage of this horrible situation, (unlike other parts of the nation) the black community told Al an BP, DON'T COME. The white community told the KKK, DON'T COME........The church my family and I attend is about 60% black, 30% white, and 10% other. I would bet that there is more racial diversity in churches in the South than any other region in the nation; and we don't need a government mandate to do it........As an Independent Conservative, I have no problem with there being differences of opinions politically. But I have a HUGE problem, as a Southerner, with you're comment that somehow you have to come "teach" us, "save" us from ourselves; and call it "progress". Now, some things we will agree on, some we won't (this is WAY too big of an issue to go into here. I'm just trying to generalize). But to be so arrogant and pretentious as to make such insulting assertions, it really leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Where's the "tolerance" and "diversity of thought" so many proclaim is so valuable to them? Do we only hold to that value when we're being agreed with? Do you always get your facts 100% straight before passing judgement on something or someone with whom you disagree? Is there a possibility you could be wrong in some of your beliefs or tactics of trying to "convert" or "progress" others? When it's you, you call it a "movement". When it's the other side doing the same thing, you call it "hate", "shoving ones beliefs down ones throat", or any of the other myriad of name calling that takes place. Though most of us here in the South welcome anyone who wants to locate here, we do take offense to anyone who comes with an attitude of superiority. How do you think NY'ers would take it if I moved there and did the same thing in reverse? It would be extremely rude and I'd deserve the backlash I'd probably get. But we can be friends, agree to disagree, vote our consciences, and actually have respect of other's views without being patronizing and insulting. Sorry for rambling and please don't take my post wrong. I want all of us, no matter who we are or where we're from, to respect one another. I just think so much of what you said is one of the reasons there is so much division in our nation. I really want to see this reverse itself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2016, 09:33 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,241,502 times
Reputation: 2222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Yeah but Dallas passed a similar law.
Not sure which law you're referring to. Certainly not the same that happened in Houston. They've had protections in place for 14 years. Last November they amended it to define "gender identity" and provided more protections.

Dallas amends anti-discrimination law to define gender identity | KDFW
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2016, 09:48 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,902,046 times
Reputation: 23217
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Social factors play a huge role in my choices. I think it depends on what you hold dear to you more.
I agree. People who are having problems with North Carolina's locker room laws do not hold children dear. I have no interest in making anyone uncomfortable but given a choice, I prefer to protect children. I expect some companies to go out of business in our state. I won't be going to !@#$%& any more. I might have the need to go to the rest room while there and their rest room policies are not acceptable. I will have to admit this will not make much difference because I was turned off by other politically correct actions in the past. We are also considering changing where we bank. Our bank was bought by a bank with some really strange policies. This change will take a while longer. We will have to make sure we are not going from the frying pan into the fire.

Last edited by NCN; 04-25-2016 at 09:58 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2016, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,443 posts, read 11,948,134 times
Reputation: 10548
Just for the record, Americans aren't leaving the Northeast for the Deep South in large numbers. Here's the proportion of North easterners who moved to different Southern States in 2014 according to the Census.

Florida: 154,000
Virginia: 83,267
North Carolina: 62,254
Texas: 62,199
Georgia: 39,039
South Carolina: 34,386
Tennessee: 15,688
West Virginia: 13,199
Kentucky: 7,107
Louisiana: 7,069
Alabama: 7,061
Oklahoma: 5,552
Mississippi: 3,195
Arkansas: 2,899.

Total raw migration: 497,131

Note that only in the case of Virginia are over 30% of domestic migrants from the Northeast. This is because if you consider MD and DC part of the Northeast there's lots of natural "churn" as people move across the border in a given year. FL, WV, NC, SC, GA, and TN come next in ranked order regarding the ratio of northeastern domestic migrants.

However, migration is a two way street. Odd as it is to say, people do move from the Southeast to the Northeast all the time, albeit not in as large numbers. This can be for a host of reasons, from transplants who soured on it, to immigrants relocating elsewhere, to small-town southerners heading for the big city, to snowbirds having to move back home so their adult children can care for them. When you subtract out the domestic migrants headed north, the numbers are way less impressive:

Florida: 70,034
South Carolina: 19,788
Texas: 19,756
North Carolina: 16,991
Virginia: 14,410
Georgia: 8,494
West Virginia: 4,430
Tennessee: 3,518
Oklahoma: 1,517
Alabama: 1,396
Kentucky: 655
Arkansas: 414
Mississippi: -99
Louisiana: -657

Total net migration: 161,647

Most states are still positive. However, the amounts are cut by more than 60% for every state but South Carolina and Florida. Although there is no way to prove this statistically, a large proportion of the net migration is probably retiree based as well. Thus while it's true that there is a net outflow of people from the Northeast to almost all states in the South, it's demographically not an important portion of population growth in most southern states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2016, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,443 posts, read 11,948,134 times
Reputation: 10548
Anyway, on a more personal level, I could never imagine myself moving to most places in the South. Not so much for the politics - I'm far enough to the left that I hate the Democrats as being too conservative, so being in a right-wing state wouldn't phase me that much more. It's more two issues.

1. I absolutely hate hot weather. I liked it as a child, but at around age 20 I started sweating profusely whenever I exercised or the temperature was above 75 or so. I'm not talking pit stains, I'm talking about looking like I came out of a shower. In contrast, while snow can be a pain, being cold doesn't really bother me one bit, as long as it's above around 20 degrees and there's no wind.

2. I like old, walkable cities, and there aren't many in the south. If my wife really pushed, I could move to somewhere like Fauborg Marigny in retirement (presuming it's still affordable) despite the climate, as you can live an urban lifestyle in a single-story house there. I can't think of too many other places though. Maybe Savannah?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2016, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,406,193 times
Reputation: 2089
I would certainly live in cities like Houston, Austin, Dallas, Atlanta, New Orleans, Nashville etc. I kind of see these cities (and others) as bastions of progress in otherwise conservative states. As a gay male would I be apprehensive about moving to the exurbs or rural parts of these states? Absolutely. That being said the rural parts of the Midwest and other regions of the U.S. also aren't exactly LGBT friendly or progressive on other social issues.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top