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Old 04-24-2016, 03:24 PM
 
1,674 posts, read 2,044,487 times
Reputation: 1074

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
I want to live somewhere that has a decent percentage of residents in their 40s and older but also isn't completely dead at night; am I screwed? :P
You find it, let me know.

Young urban millennials want their immediate neighborhood to be hip(ster), a place where they can jog, bike, walk the obligatory dog, and socialize and be foodies at the multitude of microbreweries and bistros, many of which are vegetarian or vegan. All the restaurants/cafes/bistros feel the need/pressure to be unique to the point they are all almost the same (less they not be patronized by people with grand expectations). I stayed in Lincoln Park in a recent trip to Chicago. Other than McDonald's and Pizza Hut, there were no "normal" burger or pizza joints. The places that offered these foods were cutesy-pie about it, with bean burgers or pizza with "creations" as toppings. All I wanted was non-chain, basic food, but all I found was an alright BBQ place and ok diner in the next neighborhood over. I did find a pizza joint in Lakeview that will make normal pizza if you ask, but they don't advertise it (They're pushing the PB/banana pizza, and the like.).

I've always felt connected in urban environments. Past few years, cities have felt cold to me, losing their unique, independent personalities, and becoming more corporate and/or formulated. Despite all the diversity-bragging every city makes, they all seem to be more and more a place for just one type of person. Whether I go to Philly, Chicago, or New York (or even smaller cities) I can no longer see a real difference between the cities, and the people living there are definitely the same in every city I go. I understand that cities are reaping the benefits of re-interest in them, but I personally am disappointed in the resulting sameness.
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Old 04-24-2016, 06:47 PM
 
56,766 posts, read 81,102,256 times
Reputation: 12563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil A. Delphia View Post
You find it, let me know.

Young urban millennials want their immediate neighborhood to be hip(ster), a place where they can jog, bike, walk the obligatory dog, and socialize and be foodies at the multitude of microbreweries and bistros, many of which are vegetarian or vegan. All the restaurants/cafes/bistros feel the need/pressure to be unique to the point they are all almost the same (less they not be patronized by people with grand expectations). I stayed in Lincoln Park in a recent trip to Chicago. Other than McDonald's and Pizza Hut, there were no "normal" burger or pizza joints. The places that offered these foods were cutesy-pie about it, with bean burgers or pizza with "creations" as toppings. All I wanted was non-chain, basic food, but all I found was an alright BBQ place and ok diner in the next neighborhood over. I did find a pizza joint in Lakeview that will make normal pizza if you ask, but they don't advertise it (They're pushing the PB/banana pizza, and the like.).

I've always felt connected in urban environments. Past few years, cities have felt cold to me, losing their unique, independent personalities, and becoming more corporate and/or formulated. Despite all the diversity-bragging every city makes, they all seem to be more and more a place for just one type of person. Whether I go to Philly, Chicago, or New York (or even smaller cities) I can no longer see a real difference between the cities, and the people living there are definitely the same in every city I go. I understand that cities are reaping the benefits of re-interest in them, but I personally am disappointed in the resulting sameness.
In this case, "unpopular" cities may be the best bet for what you are looking for, as they tend to not be as developed as the "popular" cities and they still have a certain old school feel to them. A lot of "Rust Belt" cities tend to fit this criteria, as they may have investment in select parts of the city, but others may remain the same in terms of character or at least have "regular" restaurants, etc.

It may also just be a matter of the neighborhood too.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 04-24-2016 at 06:56 PM..
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Old 04-24-2016, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,835,043 times
Reputation: 2858
30+ is considered old here and developers ignore every age bracket except the 20s. A craft brewery, a vegan restaurant, and high end/priced condos are on every block. Cookie Cutter Hipster is the rage. Everyone over 30 is rushing for the exurbs to places that are less hipster. You wouldn't believe how packed the dive bars and restaurants are outside of the city.
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Old 04-24-2016, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,658,600 times
Reputation: 3625
There are places that appeal to people my age (early 20s) and places that don't. These vary depending on the person.

Most people are referring to YUPPIEs (young urban professionals) when they mean this. They prefer walkable areas near outdoor activities. Hiking has become a big trend recently with this group of people, so near mountains are preferred. They are also very liberal and are almost never conservative. Places like Seattle and Denver fit these the most, though there are some other areas. They also like microbreweries, Whole Foods, etc.

People who aren't YUPPIEs but are my age (blue color or not in some trendy industry like tech), tend to go for big cities that have a good nightlife for dating and hook-ups. Sometimes they coincide with the YUPPIE favorites (San Francisco, Seattle, Denver, etc.) and sometimes, they do not like Miami, Houston, Phoenix, Los Angeles, etc.

There are YUPPIEs also plaguing other areas that I do not think fit the traditional definition of what would appeal to a young urban professional, like Austin. But for some reason it is.

Some places have always appealed to the young urban professional and always will, regardless of trends. These would be San Francisco, Boston, New York City, Chicago, and D.C. Outside of San Francisco, these cities tend to not also have the outdoor recreation that the "trendy" cities like Denver and Seattle have (note: not as much as I should say) so they will not favor the trends of people wanting urbanity and "outdoors" at the same time. But because of their urbanity, amenities, and relatively good economies, will always remain popular with the young urban professionals. There is a good chance Seattle and Denver would clime to these ranks, but because they are "new" in the eyes of the yuppies, I don't know.

Portland definitely appeals to young people, but I would not say the young urban professional demographic. It easily could do if there was more corporate jobs though. Portland appeals to a different demographic, which tend to de-emphasize the "live to work" mentality of most of these yuppie favorites and greatly emphasizes a "work to live" one.
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Old 04-25-2016, 12:24 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,110 posts, read 4,131,623 times
Reputation: 3716
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
30+ is considered old here and developers ignore every age bracket except the 20s. A craft brewery, a vegan restaurant, and high end/priced condos are on every block. Cookie Cutter Hipster is the rage. Everyone over 30 is rushing for the exurbs to places that are less hipster. You wouldn't believe how packed the dive bars and restaurants are outside of the city.
Yasss...please make it stop. We have the opposite story going on here in Nashville where the 40 and even 50+ crowd are trying to be hipsters and yuppies. They tend to have the same look, and same played out sad story, where they wasted their youth working all the time and having a bunch of kids, and now want to try to "fit in" with the in crowd by making friends with "kids," especially in the music business. They all still largely live in suburbia, and only hang out in the "cool spots" on the weekends. I pray for the day of normal looking people again without rainbow colored hair, long beards, skinny jeans and purple lipstick.
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Old 04-25-2016, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
2,707 posts, read 2,365,576 times
Reputation: 2722
I'm a single 31 older Millennial, fairly Libertarian with conservative leans. I don't care for yuppies, crowds, hipster bars, being vegan, and the noise. A lot of those types of people carry a sardonic and smug attitudes.
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Old 04-25-2016, 07:05 AM
 
5,713 posts, read 8,780,439 times
Reputation: 4932
Maybe it would be better to start a thread titled "Cities with good nightlife for the 40 plus crowd".
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Old 04-25-2016, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
1,569 posts, read 727,594 times
Reputation: 2028
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil A. Delphia View Post
You find it, let me know.
I mean, I think New York and Chicago would count at a minimum. I'm not looking for the Villages, just places that aren't SO newly developed and populated by waves of job-seeking young'uns that they lack an identity and all their activity is centered on alcohol and juvenile things like that, with comparatively few family-oriented or genuinely artistic community activities. I don't know, maybe I'm not being fair to places like Denver or Austin; this is just how I see them from what I've read. (Portland at least tries to be weird.)

Quote:
Young urban millennials want their immediate neighborhood to be hip(ster), a place where they can jog, bike, walk the obligatory dog, and socialize and be foodies at the multitude of microbreweries and bistros, many of which are vegetarian or vegan. All the restaurants/cafes/bistros feel the need/pressure to be unique to the point they are all almost the same (less they not be patronized by people with grand expectations). I stayed in Lincoln Park in a recent trip to Chicago. Other than McDonald's and Pizza Hut, there were no "normal" burger or pizza joints. The places that offered these foods were cutesy-pie about it, with bean burgers or pizza with "creations" as toppings. All I wanted was non-chain, basic food, but all I found was an alright BBQ place and ok diner in the next neighborhood over. I did find a pizza joint in Lakeview that will make normal pizza if you ask, but they don't advertise it (They're pushing the PB/banana pizza, and the like.).

I've always felt connected in urban environments. Past few years, cities have felt cold to me, losing their unique, independent personalities, and becoming more corporate and/or formulated. Despite all the diversity-bragging every city makes, they all seem to be more and more a place for just one type of person. Whether I go to Philly, Chicago, or New York (or even smaller cities) I can no longer see a real difference between the cities, and the people living there are definitely the same in every city I go. I understand that cities are reaping the benefits of re-interest in them, but I personally am disappointed in the resulting sameness.
IMO, shameless attempts at kitsch are still miles ahead of just going the Indianapolis/Columbus/Raleigh/Atlanta route and embracing your corporate blandness. It's not perfect, of course; I'd rather cities like you describe make more of an effort to theme their attractions after the city's history and ethnic identity so they can at least be artificially hip in unique ways.
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Old 04-25-2016, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,085 posts, read 2,132,133 times
Reputation: 3590
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidamarink View Post
Interesting. I am curious to hear more about this, because I was prospecting Denver as a place to move to and date in. Denver is supposed to be a surplus of males type of city ("Menver"), but I know that doesn't necessarily mean they are all marriage-minded. I have heard one testimony from a female who said there are plenty of men but rarely do they want commitment. Maybe Denver is like the NYC for male Carrie Bradshaws (Sex & The City) - the guys who want to live up the "single guy" life? lol In that case, I have no interest in Denver.
I'm always surprised to read this since Denver has typically been a 50/50 ratio of male and female residents for quite some time. Then again, there are also a lot of people who think Denver is in the mountains too, so I guess it shouldn't surprise me that their demographics are also viewed incorrectly.

According to hometodenver.com, it also has the highest percentage of baby boomers of any city in the nation, so that would tend to tell me has a more mature cultural setting than some cities that have more appeal to younger people.
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Old 04-25-2016, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Southern California
270 posts, read 224,678 times
Reputation: 206
In Southern California, it seems that a city with a culture that appeals to young people:

- Has a high population of young people.
- Is urban, not yet "gentrified", and at least somewhat gritty/dangerous, which supposedly makes it "authentic".
- Is unkempt-looking enough that stickers and graffiti are not promptly removed.
- Is socially accepting of young people's fashion/cultural trends, i.e. one will not be looked at askance for having green hair, cheek shorts, and three noserings.
- Is accepting of drug use and drunkenness.
- Has yoga studios and vegan restraurants.
- Has small music venues and is near large outdoor music festivals.
- Is bicycle-friendly.
- Is politically liberal.
- Has many used clothing stores and hipster stores.

There are probably more, but those come to mind.
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