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Old 04-25-2016, 12:23 PM
 
5,706 posts, read 8,773,655 times
Reputation: 4928

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Quote:
I've always felt connected in urban environments. Past few years, cities have felt cold to me, losing their unique, independent personalities, and becoming more corporate and/or formulated. Despite all the diversity-bragging every city makes, they all seem to be more and more a place for just one type of person. Whether I go to Philly, Chicago, or New York (or even smaller cities) I can no longer see a real difference between the cities, and the people living there are definitely the same in every city I go. I understand that cities are reaping the benefits of re-interest in them, but I personally am disappointed in the resulting sameness.
My theory is that as demand grows, the urban fabric is torn for new dense development. It's only chains that can afford rent on new construction, thus the blandness.

Phil, I'll invite you to come on down and visit Knoxville TN. It's not so trendy that it has lost its identity. You can take the megabus if you have a long weekend. Another smaller choice is Roanoke, then there's Richmond which is even closer.
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Old 04-25-2016, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,037 posts, read 4,559,773 times
Reputation: 1422
I love my city a lot because it retains a lot of culture while still maintaining pretty modern amenities. It can appeal to both traditionalists because of the small business atmosphere but there are pockets of areas for the more hipster urban/college crowd. Its a pretty good balance and it doesnt cost an exorbitant amount to enjoy it.
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Old 04-25-2016, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,651,369 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phrogg View Post
In Southern California, it seems that a city with a culture that appeals to young people:

- Has a high population of young people.
- Is urban, not yet "gentrified", and at least somewhat gritty/dangerous, which supposedly makes it "authentic".
- Is unkempt-looking enough that stickers and graffiti are not promptly removed.
- Is socially accepting of young people's fashion/cultural trends, i.e. one will not be looked at askance for having green hair, cheek shorts, and three noserings.
- Is accepting of drug use and drunkenness.
- Has yoga studios and vegan restraurants.
- Has small music venues and is near large outdoor music festivals.
- Is bicycle-friendly.
- Is politically liberal.
- Has many used clothing stores and hipster stores.

There are probably more, but those come to mind.
I want to address this part specifically as it's sort of a popular aesthetic trend in design.

A type of architectural and interior design that I will refer to as "industrial modern" is a new trend and IMO, good looking. You can google that and see for yourself. In order to achieve this look, a lot of brick is used and frankly most of these designs do come from refurbished blue-collar or manufacturing areas. You will see that in the design a lot of new apartments and buildings they will have open ceilings, showing vents and support beams that kind of giveaway towards this appearance. It's a popular look for kitchens but you can find it for other things. Exposed steel, lots of brick, concrete, etc.

Portland became big for having this aesthetic in some of their areas. I heard Pittsburgh is another city that has a lot of this, and would make sense given its history.

This is a popular "hipster" design I guess you could say. Just google "industrial modern" and you'll see what I mean.
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Old 04-26-2016, 05:47 AM
 
7,738 posts, read 4,581,276 times
Reputation: 8445
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
30+ is considered old here and developers ignore every age bracket except the 20s. A craft brewery, a vegan restaurant, and high end/priced condos are on every block. Cookie Cutter Hipster is the rage. Everyone over 30 is rushing for the exurbs to places that are less hipster. You wouldn't believe how packed the dive bars and restaurants are outside of the city.
How are you so wrong about everything related to a city you claim to live in? Nearly everything new in Pittsburgh is for thirtysomethings aging from hipster into (not-so)yuppie. You're either well over 50, live outside of the city, or both. Whichever it is, you're completely out of touch.
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Old 04-26-2016, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,405,651 times
Reputation: 2089
In general:

-Large variety of bars and happy hours!
-Quality restaurants
-Socially progressive
-Walkable downtown/core neighborhoods
-Ability to uber or utilize public transit easily
-Young demographic in terms of age (mid thirties to recent college grads and current students)
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Old 04-26-2016, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,558 posts, read 720,474 times
Reputation: 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
I want to address this part specifically as it's sort of a popular aesthetic trend in design.

A type of architectural and interior design that I will refer to as "industrial modern" is a new trend and IMO, good looking. You can google that and see for yourself. In order to achieve this look, a lot of brick is used and frankly most of these designs do come from refurbished blue-collar or manufacturing areas. You will see that in the design a lot of new apartments and buildings they will have open ceilings, showing vents and support beams that kind of giveaway towards this appearance. It's a popular look for kitchens but you can find it for other things. Exposed steel, lots of brick, concrete, etc.

Portland became big for having this aesthetic in some of their areas. I heard Pittsburgh is another city that has a lot of this, and would make sense given its history.

This is a popular "hipster" design I guess you could say. Just google "industrial modern" and you'll see what I mean.
Oh, I love that design.
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,651,369 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Oh, I love that design.
Me too! Lifts are sold at a premium for having this look!
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Old 04-26-2016, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,831,940 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
How are you so wrong about everything related to a city you claim to live in? Nearly everything new in Pittsburgh is for thirtysomethings aging from hipster into (not-so)yuppie. You're either well over 50, live outside of the city, or both. Whichever it is, you're completely out of touch.
I am well under 50, live in the city, and am not a hipster yuppie. I wasn't born here so I call it as I see it. Developers have taken a couple neighborhoods and turned them into Williamsburg, Brooklyn which is only speeding up the decline of the city.
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Old 04-29-2016, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Southern California
270 posts, read 224,417 times
Reputation: 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
I want to address this part specifically as it's sort of a popular aesthetic trend in design.

A type of architectural and interior design that I will refer to as "industrial modern" is a new trend and IMO, good looking. You can google that and see for yourself. In order to achieve this look, a lot of brick is used and frankly most of these designs do come from refurbished blue-collar or manufacturing areas. You will see that in the design a lot of new apartments and buildings they will have open ceilings, showing vents and support beams that kind of giveaway towards this appearance. It's a popular look for kitchens but you can find it for other things. Exposed steel, lots of brick, concrete, etc.

Portland became big for having this aesthetic in some of their areas. I heard Pittsburgh is another city that has a lot of this, and would make sense given its history.

This is a popular "hipster" design I guess you could say. Just google "industrial modern" and you'll see what I mean.
Actually, I meant places that really look like no one cares to clean them up. The industrial chic thing is a different beast entirely, though I agree that it's popular amongst young people and deserves to be on the list. It's not my own top choice aesthetically, but I don't mind it. Is it really that new? I remember the Urban Outfitters in Portland had that look back in the '90s. (Appropriate, perhaps, since the '90s seem to be the root of all hipster.)
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