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Old 04-24-2016, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,537 posts, read 708,496 times
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In the process of researching where I might like to relocate in a year or so, something I sometimes see used to characterize cities is their age demographics. Austin, Denver, Portland, even Brooklyn and the North Shore of Chicago - these are places routinely described as popular with and suitable for young residents. So what are potential movers supposed to get out of this? Millennials aren't any more or less diverse in upbringings and interests than any previous generation; is a "young people's city" just one with a lot of clubs? One where the church is not the dominant social institution? One with a high percentage of jobs in the technology and creative industries?

I want to live somewhere that has a decent percentage of residents in their 40s and older but also isn't completely dead at night; am I screwed? :P
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Old 04-24-2016, 10:43 AM
 
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You may be interested in this: The next wave: A new generation is changing Rochester.

What brain drain? | Rochester Business Journal New York business news and information
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Old 04-24-2016, 10:45 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,674 posts, read 28,709,830 times
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Guess?

There seem to be a of of younger people asking about dating, so I assume a young culture has a strong dating scene. Night clubs, lots of good looking younger population.

Sports culture, walkable city center, bike lanes, boutique breweries?

High paying jobs for workers with weak skill sets. Lots of cheap high speed internet.
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Old 04-24-2016, 10:53 AM
 
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I would guess loud, crowded and relatively expensive.
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Old 04-24-2016, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,537 posts, read 708,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Guess?

There seem to be a of of younger people asking about dating, so I assume a young culture has a strong dating scene. Night clubs, lots of good looking younger population.

Sports culture, walkable city center, bike lanes, boutique breweries?

High paying jobs for workers with weak skill sets. Lots of cheap high speed internet.
To me, those just sound like attributes of typical cities, especially when sports are included. What cities aren't young people's cities by this definition?
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Old 04-24-2016, 12:17 PM
 
214 posts, read 193,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
There seem to be a of of younger people asking about dating, so I assume a young culture has a strong dating scene. Night clubs, lots of good looking younger population.
The irony is that the larger the dating pool, the more difficult it is to find someone. Denver is a great example. It's filled with women looking for "Mr. Perfect" and a small percentage of men that meet the "Mr. Perfect" attributes. Unfortunately "Mr. Perfect" has no desire to be in a committed relationship.
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Old 04-24-2016, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
To me, those just sound like attributes of typical cities, especially when sports are included. What cities aren't young people's cities by this definition?
Suburban sprawled out cities.
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Old 04-24-2016, 03:00 PM
 
Location: West of the Rockies
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I think the most important qualification would be having a high percentage of singles ages 20-40 years old.

In addition to that:

Lots of entry level professional jobs for those with Bachelor's degrees as well as many jobs for those without degrees that pay at least $15/hr.

Affordable housing - the average single bedroom would have to be no more than 25% of the average 20-40 year old's monthly income in the given area. Cities like San Francisco would already be out of the equation in this category, and statistics back that up. Either that, or there would have to be enough of a rental market where people are renting out their rooms or looking for roommates and this would have to be widely acceptable in the local culture.

Social venues that are affordable and don't require thousands of dollars to participate in - this could range from bars & breweries, night clubs, some outdoors activities, live music, etc.

Co-ops and other affordable organic groceries

Other nearby suburbs that make it affordable to raise a family, as opposed to a place like NYC or DC where many people are perpetually childless because it's too expensive to raise a kid there. Most young people still want to have kids someday.
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Old 04-24-2016, 03:13 PM
 
Location: West of the Rockies
1,112 posts, read 1,870,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirty-Mill View Post
The irony is that the larger the dating pool, the more difficult it is to find someone. Denver is a great example. It's filled with women looking for "Mr. Perfect" and a small percentage of men that meet the "Mr. Perfect" attributes. Unfortunately "Mr. Perfect" has no desire to be in a committed relationship.
Interesting. I am curious to hear more about this, because I was prospecting Denver as a place to move to and date in. Denver is supposed to be a surplus of males type of city ("Menver"), but I know that doesn't necessarily mean they are all marriage-minded. I have heard one testimony from a female who said there are plenty of men but rarely do they want commitment. Maybe Denver is like the NYC for male Carrie Bradshaws (Sex & The City) - the guys who want to live up the "single guy" life? lol In that case, I have no interest in Denver.
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Old 04-24-2016, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Dothan AL
1,450 posts, read 876,506 times
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I read, lots of good dive bars, beer barns, bait shops, smoke shops, gun stores, fishing lakes, car racing, tractor pulls, and plenty of greasy-spoon cafes; Walmart, maybe a Piggly Wiggly? Lots of mobile home parks, car body shops, auto parts junk yards, flea markets, and dew-drop-in hangouts. Well, for rednecks, anyway.

Last edited by OldDocKat; 04-24-2016 at 03:32 PM..
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