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Old 04-26-2016, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Yeah Newark as well. Not as familiar with Trenton, but I'd think that being the state capital would kinda soften any Rust Belt effect.
Trenton is probably one of the few capital cities where you legitimately should fear for your life outside of the state capitol. It's solidly Rustbelt with abandoned steel factories, a violent crime rate more than 5 times the state average, a population that hasn't grown since the 1950 census and a quarter of the residents living in poverty. I think Newark has a better shot at recovery due its waterfront, proximity to NYC and status as a transportation hub.

 
Old 04-26-2016, 12:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I used a definition provided online, if you have one that you think is more appropriate feel free to share.

Whether Pittsburgh is in the Midwest or not is debatable. Being from the NYC area I find that it has much more in common with Cleveland or Cincinnati than with Philadelphia or New York or Boston, but everyone is entitled to their opinion and mine certainly isn't the only one.

In terms of Chicago not being a rust-belt city I would agree that it's economy is large and diverse enough that it doesn't fit the industrial conditions of a rustbelt city. In terms of population decline it certainly does though.
Being from the actual city of New York, currently residing in Pittsburgh, I will arrest to the fact that Pittsburgh is, in fact a Rust Belt city, meaning it is a formerly industrial city that lost a great deal of its population when that industry died in the 70a and 80s. It is not, however, the midwest. It seems less like Boston New York Philadelphia and DC, because it's a fraction of the size of those cities. In fact, it's actually pretty similar to Baltimore, another rust belt city. No, Pittsburgh is not on the East Coast, but it's in the northeast.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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I was slightly surprised that the latest census estimates show the population is not growing in the rust belt metros touted as making a comeback such as Pittsburgh or Cleveland (actually I haven't heard much about Cleveland making a comeback but you cited it as an example). They might not be losing as much population as the 70s or 80s but they aren't gaining either..most are around the range of +0.2 to -0.2 year to year which is well below the national average of +0.9.

Overall I agree with your list. Although I would put all your debatable cities firmly in the rust belt category, except for Chicago which I would put in non rust belt. Although when it comes to population growth, Chicago has more in common with the rust belt than the non rust belt Midwest which is booming in comparison. I don't believe it was always this way but something changed recently. Chicago lost population over the past year while the rustiest of rust belt big cities Detroit actually had a very slight gain.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Being from the actual city of New York, currently residing in Pittsburgh, I will arrest to the fact that Pittsburgh is, in fact a Rust Bekt city, meaning it is a formerly industrial city that lost a great deal of its population when that industry died in the 70a and 80s. It is not, however, the midwest. It seems less like Boston New York Philadelphia and DC, because it's a fraction of the size of those cities. In fact, it's actually pretty similar to Baltimore, another rust belt city. No, Pittsburgh is not on the East Coast, but it's in the northeast.
Pittsburgh is about 33 miles from the Ohio border while it's 304 miles from Philadelphia. Is Ohio in the Midwest?

Either way you are entitled to your beliefs and I'm not here to change them
 
Old 04-26-2016, 01:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
I was slightly surprised that the latest census estimates show the population is not growing in the rust belt metros touted as making a comeback such as Pittsburgh or Cleveland (actually I haven't heard much about Cleveland making a comeback but you cited it as an example). They might not be losing as much population as the 70s or 80s but they aren't gaining either..most are around the range of +0.2 to -0.2 year to year which is well below the national average of +0.9.
Pittsburgh's lack of growth is tied to its gentrification. Singles and DINKs are replacing poor families. Before 2013-2014, there wasn't a lot of new construction to accommodate new residents, so there was more population shuffle than population growth. I expect that the change in the near future, as condos and apartments buildings are going up everywhere.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 01:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Trenton is probably one of the few capital cities where you legitimately should fear for your life outside of the state capitol. It's solidly Rustbelt with abandoned steel factories, a violent crime rate more than 5 times the state average, a population that hasn't grown since the 1950 census and a quarter of the residents living in poverty. I think Newark has a better shot at recovery due its waterfront, proximity to NYC and status as a transportation hub.
Wow...and I used to live not far from Trenton (Camden County), but never had any reason to go there or even travel through. I didn't know it was in such dire straights.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Wow...and I used to live not far from Trenton (Camden County), but never had any reason to go there or even travel through. I didn't know it was in such dire straights.
Granted I am being a bit melodramatic to emphasize a point with the whole "fear for your life" statement but Trenton is to Central Jersey what the City of Camden is to Southwest Jersey. New Jersey has so much going for it, it's a shame are cities are in such shambles for the most part.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Arch City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
The Rust Belt is a term for the region straddling the upper Northeastern United States, the Great Lakes, and the Midwest States, referring to economic decline, population loss, and urban decay due to the shrinking of its once powerful industrial sector. Based on this definition how would you categorize the various Midwestern cities?

This list is meant to spur conversation, not to offend, and is by no means definitive in nature. If you disagree simply state why respectfully and present new information

Not rust belt:
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Columbus
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Omaha
Madison
Des Moines
Ann Arbor

Debatable
Cleveland (making a comeback but not sure if there is a ton of population growth in city limits)
Cincinnati (Not sure where to categorize Cincy)
Pittsburgh (also having a renaissance, not sure to what extent though)
Chicago (losing population, still the most powerful economic force in the Midwest by far)
Milwaukee (not familiar with it, so that's the main reason for this category)

Solidly Rustbelt
Detroit (proper)
St. Louis
Akron
Dayton
Gary
Flint
Toledo
Youngstown
Pittsburgh and Cleveland are still the Rust Belt. St. Louis is experiencing as much of a Renaissance as these two cities. IMO. Milwaukee is definitely the Rust Belt...Chicago has had Rust Belt effects but primarily escapes its influences by being an economic powerhouse.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 01:41 PM
 
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The rust belt will always be the rust belt. That doesn't mean that the cities are still dependent on manufacturing or economically depressed. Pittsburgh, as an Eds-and-Meds economy will always be a rust belt city. It's a geographic and historical designation, at this point. Chicago is not, nor has it ever been a rust belt city, because its economy was not tied to a dead/dying industry. It had ONE decade of population loss, the 90s. The rust belt encompasses cities that crashed in the 70s and 80s.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 02:29 PM
 
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The rust belt extended all the way from NJ just west of NYC , included Camden, Baltimore, Philly, Allentown, Pittsburgh, etc, West Virginia, much of Ohio, the Detroit and Flint areas, and cities like Gary, Indiana and usually St. Louis are considered rust belt also. Chicago, not so much. I don't think places like Milwaukee qualify. So rust belt is a midregion that covers a portion of the Northeast and Midwest.

The cities have made some comebacks, to varying degrees, but I wouldn't say any of them are booming. The larger ones have mostly fared better than the smaller ones.
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