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Old 04-26-2016, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Indianapolis may not be in the Rust Belt, but there is a lot of blight that would not be out of place in the Rust Belt proper. You see this in a lot of Midwestern cities.

 
Old 04-26-2016, 03:14 PM
 
891 posts, read 1,078,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
The Rust Belt is a term for the region straddling the upper Northeastern United States, the Great Lakes, and the Midwest States, referring to economic decline, population loss, and urban decay due to the shrinking of its once powerful industrial sector. Based on this definition how would you categorize the various Midwestern cities?

This list is meant to spur conversation, not to offend, and is by no means definitive in nature. If you disagree simply state why respectfully and present new information

Not rust belt:
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Columbus
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Omaha
Madison
Des Moines
Ann Arbor

Debatable
Cleveland (making a comeback but not sure if there is a ton of population growth in city limits)
Cincinnati (Not sure where to categorize Cincy)
Pittsburgh (also having a renaissance, not sure to what extent though)
Chicago (losing population, still the most powerful economic force in the Midwest by far)
Milwaukee (not familiar with it, so that's the main reason for this category)

Solidly Rustbelt
Detroit (proper)
St. Louis
Akron
Dayton
Gary
Flint
Toledo
Youngstown
Not sure how Cleveland and Pittsburgh escaped the "Solidly Rustbelt" category, as both of them lost a higher percentage of city population than St. Louis over the past 20 years, and both continue to decrease in overall metro population. Rust Belt technically applies to post-industrial cities that have similar patterns of economic erosion in the Great Lakes/Midwest region. Chicago still has many non-Rust Belt attributes, namely population decline, high segregation, political corruption, old-line industry, etc.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
4,403 posts, read 4,604,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
The rust belt extended all the way from NJ just west of NYC , included Camden, Baltimore, Philly, Allentown, Pittsburgh, etc, West Virginia, much of Ohio, the Detroit and Flint areas, and cities like Gary, Indiana and usually St. Louis are considered rust belt also. Chicago, not so much. I don't think places like Milwaukee qualify. So rust belt is a midregion that covers a portion of the Northeast and Midwest.

The cities have made some comebacks, to varying degrees, but I wouldn't say any of them are booming. The larger ones have mostly fared better than the smaller ones.

I was born in Milwaukee and it seems totally rust belt to me. So much manufacturing/former manufacturing there. There are parts of town that look as stereotypical rust belt as you can find anywhere. Plus it has the all the population trends of a typical rust belt city. It was once considered a major city, I believe a top 15 market at it's peak (which is how it was able to attract major sports franchises).After population loses in the 70s and 80s (the early 80s recession was brutal to Milwaukee) it devolved into a medium sized city. In recent years, like fellow rust belt cities, there has been very little or no population growth. Also, similar to rust belt Detroit, Milwaukee is extremely segregated and has a very dangerous inner city core. Drop some one off in a ghetto area of Milwaukee and some would guess they are in Detroit.

Does anyone remember a book from the early 80s about regions of the country? They called the rust belt the Foundry. They put Milwaukee in it and devoted a paragraph to how Green Bay was very much a part of it as well.

Last edited by Jay F; 04-26-2016 at 03:31 PM..
 
Old 04-26-2016, 03:29 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,069,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
I was born in Milwaukee and it seems totally rust belt to me. So much manufacturing/former manufacturing there. There are parts of town that look as stereotypical rust belt as you can find anywhere. Plus it has the all the population trends of a typical rust belt city. It was once considered a major city, I believe a top 15 market at it's peak. After population loses in the 70s and 80s (the early 80s recession was brutal to Milwaukee) it devolved into a medium sized city. In recent years, like fellow rust belt cities, there has been very little or no population growth. Also, similar to rust belt Detroit, Milwaukee is extremely segregated and has a very dangerous inner city core. Drop some one off in a ghetto area of Milwaukee and some would guess they are in Detroit.
You are choosing to dwell only on the negative. Yes, it's segregated, and aside from the inner city core, the city has a lot of wealth. Milwaukee is reinventing itself, and downtown is growing...new construction and more people moving downtown and to the Third Ward. Milwaukee is taking the lead, and is now a global water hub. This is something that is important to the city's future, and will definitely put Milwaukee on the map, in a positive way. I love the city, and if you avoid the inner core (and why wouldn't you), you're going to find a LOT about Milwaukee that is awesome.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
4,403 posts, read 4,604,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
You are choosing to dwell only on the negative. Yes, it's segregated, and aside from the inner city core, the city has a lot of wealth. Milwaukee is reinventing itself, and downtown is growing...new construction and more people moving downtown and to the Third Ward. Milwaukee is taking the lead, and is now a global water hub. This is something that is important to the city's future, and will definitely put Milwaukee on the map, in a positive way. I love the city, and if you avoid the inner core (and why wouldn't you), you're going to find a LOT about Milwaukee that is awesome.
I agree there are a lot of good things about Milwaukee. My point is that it's a rust belt city, that's its heritage. Despite the good things happening there at this point its (lack of) population growth is identical to other rust belt cities. The cities the OP listed as not rust belt are all growing.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 03:54 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,069,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
I agree there are a lot of good things about Milwaukee. My point is that it's a rust belt city, that's its heritage. Despite the good things happening there at this point its (lack of) population growth is identical to other rust belt cities. The cities the OP listed as not rust belt are all growing.
Milwaukee is growing...slowly, but it's growing.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 05:41 PM
 
3,955 posts, read 3,487,388 times
Reputation: 6331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
The Rust Belt is a term for the region straddling the upper Northeastern United States, the Great Lakes, and the Midwest States, referring to economic decline, population loss, and urban decay due to the shrinking of its once powerful industrial sector. Based on this definition how would you categorize the various Midwestern cities?

This list is meant to spur conversation, not to offend, and is by no means definitive in nature. If you disagree simply state why respectfully and present new information

Not rust belt:
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Columbus
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Omaha
Madison
Des Moines
Ann Arbor

Debatable
Cleveland (making a comeback but not sure if there is a ton of population growth in city limits)
Cincinnati (Not sure where to categorize Cincy)
Pittsburgh (also having a renaissance, not sure to what extent though)
Chicago (losing population, still the most powerful economic force in the Midwest by far)
Milwaukee (not familiar with it, so that's the main reason for this category)

Solidly Rustbelt
Detroit (proper)
St. Louis
Akron
Dayton
Gary
Flint
Toledo
Youngstown
Hi my name is Grand Rapids, i'm a midwestern city of almost 200,000 people with a metro area of over 1 million people. I grew up as an industrial city during the manufacturing age and had some of the same symptoms of decline exhibited in other midwestern/rust belt cities. However since the 80/90s i've started quickly transitioning into more of a knowledge/health care/services based city. I am noted for my stronger than average population growth, billions of dollars of new investment, evolving social scene, and rocking economy. However people forget I exist alot.
 
Old 04-26-2016, 07:38 PM
 
1,528 posts, read 1,493,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
Hi my name is Grand Rapids, i'm a midwestern city of almost 200,000 people with a metro area of over 1 million people. I grew up as an industrial city during the manufacturing age and had some of the same symptoms of decline exhibited in other midwestern/rust belt cities. However since the 80/90s i've started quickly transitioning into more of a knowledge/health care/services based city. I am noted for my stronger than average population growth, billions of dollars of new investment, evolving social scene, and rocking economy. However people forget I exist alot.
Hi Grand Rapids. I also know that you have a CSA of 1.4 million people.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTG0kRWOV8c
 
Old 04-26-2016, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,825,168 times
Reputation: 2858
Pittsburgh is very East Coast. I can't figure out why anyone would think this is a Midwest town. I would compare it more to DC or Philly in attitude.

It's a dying city core with a couple hipster neighborhoods. A few burbs are the only areas showing growth because of the migration out of the city.
 
Old 04-27-2016, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,718 posts, read 3,570,956 times
Reputation: 2331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I used a definition provided online, if you have one that you think is more appropriate feel free to share.

Whether Pittsburgh is in the Midwest or not is debatable. Being from the NYC area I find that it has much more in common with Cleveland or Cincinnati than with Philadelphia or New York or Boston, but everyone is entitled to their opinion and mine certainly isn't the only one.

In terms of Chicago not being a rust-belt city I would agree that it's economy is large and diverse enough that it doesn't fit the industrial conditions of a rustbelt city. In terms of population decline it certainly does though.
No, it's not for debate. Pittsburgh is in the Northeast, not debatable.

Its also not debatable if it's in the Rust Belt. Pittsburgh is the DEFINITION of rust belt. Just because it's Renaissance has blurred it onto the path of Boston or Portland doesn't mean it wasn't the most devastated city after the collapse of the industrial age.
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