U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 04-27-2016, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
Reputation: 10536

Advertisements

In my experience, the rust belt has two distinct zones: A core geographic region, and a fringe of cities sometimes considered part of the rust belt.

The core cities of the rust belt are basically Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Detroit, and Milwaukee, plus many smaller nearby cities. Chicago is within this region, but generally not considered part of the rust belt - in part because it's a world class city, in part because what industry there was in the city tended to focus more on food processing and smaller-scale industry which did not collapse catastrophically the way that heavy manufacturing did.

There's also "outlier" cities which aren't in the rust belt, but are of the rust belt. In the Midwest, examples would be Saint Louis, Evansville, the Quad Cities region on the IL/IA border, and Duluth. In the Northeast, places like Scranton, Reading, Camden, Binghamton, etc. Cities which were historically manufacturing dominated do get to "graduate" out of this category if they diversify their economies enough (as Boston and Philadelphia did).

 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,401,284 times
Reputation: 2089
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
Hi my name is Grand Rapids, i'm a midwestern city of almost 200,000 people with a metro area of over 1 million people. I grew up as an industrial city during the manufacturing age and had some of the same symptoms of decline exhibited in other midwestern/rust belt cities. However since the 80/90s i've started quickly transitioning into more of a knowledge/health care/services based city. I am noted for my stronger than average population growth, billions of dollars of new investment, evolving social scene, and rocking economy. However people forget I exist alot.
I've only been to Michigan once and it was Downtown Detroit so I'm not super familiar with the state. Grand Rapids' development sounds interesting!
 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,401,284 times
Reputation: 2089
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Pittsburgh is very East Coast. I can't figure out why anyone would think this is a Midwest town. I would compare it more to DC or Philly in attitude.

It's a dying city core with a couple hipster neighborhoods. A few burbs are the only areas showing growth because of the migration out of the city.
Pittsburgh is nothing like Washington D.C. However, if this many people from Pittsburgh are adamant that is not in the Midwest than I have no problem conceding that it's a northeastern city.

It seems like everyone is in agreement that it is a solidly Rustbelt city. I was under the impression it undergone a great renaissance but has this only been concentrated in a few select neighborhoods?
 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:32 AM
 
Location: New England
2,183 posts, read 1,354,668 times
Reputation: 1917
I'm surprised noone has mentioned upstate New York. I would consider Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, and even Springfield Massachusetts to exhibit the same industrial declines that Midwestern cities endured in the 1970s and 1980s. Below is a map of areas that lost the most manufacturing jobs between 1954 and 2002. The darker reds are the largest decreases.



Here is a map of the change in per capita income in the Northeast/Midwest from 1980 until 2002.


Last edited by tysmith95; 04-27-2016 at 08:45 AM..
 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:35 AM
 
2,200 posts, read 2,319,213 times
Reputation: 1941
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Pittsburgh is very East Coast.
Hahahahaha.
 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:39 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,071,101 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
I'm surprised noone has mentioned upstate New York. I would consider Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, and even Springfield Massachusetts to exhibit the same industrial declines that Midwestern cities endured in the 1970s and 1980s. Below is a map of cities that lost the most manufacturing jobs between 1954 and 2002.
The gold and green cities were the least impacted.
 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:40 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,071,101 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
I'm surprised noone has mentioned upstate New York. I would consider Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, and even Springfield Massachusetts to exhibit the same industrial declines that Midwestern cities endured in the 1970s and 1980s. Below is a map of cities that lost the most manufacturing jobs between 1954 and 2002.
The gold cities were the least impacted, and the green were not impacted at all...I believe.
 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:43 AM
 
Location: New England
2,183 posts, read 1,354,668 times
Reputation: 1917
Quote:
Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
The gold cities were the least impacted, and the green were not impacted at all...I believe.
Green means a gain or decrease of less than 8% in the number of manufacturing jobs. Gold is a decrease of between 8% and 29%. From these maps it seems like Pittsburgh and Buffalo were affected the most by a decline in manufacturing. Minneapolis looks like it wasn't impacted at all.

Last edited by tysmith95; 04-27-2016 at 08:53 AM..
 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,826,606 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Pittsburgh is nothing like Washington D.C. However, if this many people from Pittsburgh are adamant that is not in the Midwest than I have no problem conceding that it's a northeastern city.

It seems like everyone is in agreement that it is a solidly Rustbelt city. I was under the impression it undergone a great renaissance but has this only been concentrated in a few select neighborhoods?
This is so not a Midwestern city (take a drive and see how crazy it gets on the roads here). There is even a thread over on the Ohio forum about how much the attitude changes once you cross over the Ohio border. Not at all like the marketing that has been put out there or what I expected when I moved here. The "renaissance" is marketing. Yes, there are East End neighborhoods and neighborhoods by the stadiums that have been revitalized but that is it. Our population numbers are down and the growth in the outlying counties is based on migration from Pittsburgh. The city is like most other cities. A couple nice neighborhoods surrounded by ones on a fast decline. Check out Wilkinsburg (where the mass shooting happened), Penn Hills, McKees Rocks, etc. We have an high rental market (1br start at $1000) because residents aren't purchasing properties. The job market is only average. A friend turned down a move to Pittsburgh because he could make $40,000 more in Philadelphia. I know the image that is used to market Pittsburgh but it's not at all what the city is like.
 
Old 04-27-2016, 08:52 AM
 
7,702 posts, read 4,562,015 times
Reputation: 8416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post

It seems like everyone is in agreement that it is a solidly Rustbelt city. I was under the impression it undergone a great renaissance but has this only been concentrated in a few select neighborhoods?
It is undergoing a renaissance. The other poster seems to believe that every neighborhood is supposed to gentrify at the same time. The city proper, is doing extremely well, and will continue to improve, but it will always be a Rust Belt city, which contrary to what you seem to believe, does not mean they it's still struggling.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top