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Old 04-29-2016, 04:22 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 696,848 times
Reputation: 396

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Between 1950 and the present, Baltimore lost 35% of its population. It went from being the sixth largest city, to the 26th. It is most certainly a Rust Belt city. That's not an indictment, it's just a fact.
It was once second largest.

I know; I'm not trying to create false realities. I'm just saying it did not suffer nearly as much as the cities over in the Great Lakes region did, and am offering that as a reason why people may exclude it from the definition. Many non-rust belt cities lost 30% of their population, and Birmingham must be rust belt if Baltimore is, as you can see if you read my post.

Edit: Decay may be more noticeable in Baltimore and Philly because it happened in the row house sections of our cities, and it is more expensive to deal with an abandoned rowhouse than it is a detached home.

 
Old 04-29-2016, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,228,885 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
It was once second largest.

I know; I'm not trying to create false realities. I'm just saying it did not suffer nearly as much as the cities over in the Great Lakes region did, and am offering that as a reason why people may exclude it from the definition. Many non-rust belt cities lost 30% of their population, and Birmingham must be rust belt if Baltimore is, as you can see if you read my post.

Edit: Decay may be more noticeable in Baltimore and Philly because it happened in the row house sections of our cities, and it is more expensive to deal with an abandoned rowhouse than it is a detached home.
Baltimore had a heavy manufacturing industry which is what distinguishes it from Southern cities and groups it more in with Northern cities. I know how much you don't want Baltimore to be Northern but the fact is that culturally and linguistically it is more like Northern cities than Southern ones.
 
Old 04-29-2016, 05:46 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 696,848 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Baltimore had a heavy manufacturing industry which is what distinguishes it from Southern cities and groups it more in with Northern cities. I know how much you don't want Baltimore to be Northern but the fact is that culturally and linguistically it is more like Northern cities than Southern ones.
This has nothing to do with North and South, I just compared Baltimore with Minneapolis, Philadelphia and Boston ! I am distinguishing it from Pittsburgh and Midwestern cities, not Northeastern ones.

Don't obsess over another argument; I know you dislike me because we disagree on a certain topic (where you ignore the facts I bring to the table anyway) but it's not as big of a deal as you're making it. Calm down, back off.
 
Old 04-29-2016, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
5,958 posts, read 7,329,926 times
Reputation: 3739
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I never said it was in Ohio. A sensible person could draw the conclusion that seeing that Pittsburgh is a mere 30 miles from the Ohio border it is not illogical to surmise that there would be some cultural overlap between Eastern Ohio and Pittsburgh. That being said several posters have already adamantly asserted that Pittsburgh is in fact not mid-western and is a northeastern city culturally. I already conceded that point so can we please move on.
No there really isn't considering Pittsburgh and Western PA has significantly more people than there are in Eastern Ohio and was founded and populated first. It would then be sensible logical to summarize the cultural influence would be from Pittsburgh onto Eastern Ohio, not the other way around. Do you really think we ever to go Eastern Ohio or care much about it in this city? With how unpopulated many of the counties in Ohio nearest to Pittsburgh are and how little there is to see in them, Ohio might as well be 100 instead of 30 miles from Downtown. People on here really think counties with a population of 100,000 or less have major influence on a county with 1.2 million instead of the other way around? LOL
 
Old 04-30-2016, 06:30 AM
 
3,963 posts, read 3,498,160 times
Reputation: 6372
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
No there really isn't considering Pittsburgh and Western PA has significantly more people than there are in Eastern Ohio and was founded and populated first. It would then be sensible logical to summarize the cultural influence would be from Pittsburgh onto Eastern Ohio, not the other way around. Do you really think we ever to go Eastern Ohio or care much about it in this city? With how unpopulated many of the counties in Ohio nearest to Pittsburgh are and how little there is to see in them, Ohio might as well be 100 instead of 30 miles from Downtown. People on here really think counties with a population of 100,000 or less have major influence on a county with 1.2 million instead of the other way around? LOL
The point was already conceded, i'm not sure why you needed to hammer this in further other than an emotional need to be validated.

I think the point the OP was trying to make is that there is no solid wall that divides regions and culture, that it fades in and out. Referring to Pittsburgh as Midwestern on this website is akin to fighting words. It is seen as a pejorative and the Pittsburgh representation does everything it can to make sure the city is branded the more elite "Northeastern", even if Pittsburgh shares qualities with both regions (Yes the western PA border is a concrete dividing line between the two). The Ohio River is also seen as this impenetrable north/south divide, somehow Cincinatti(Midwestern) and Louisville(Southern) are concretely defined even though they have influences of both, and their urban areas sit on both sides of that divide.

As far as I have ever been able to tell Pittsburgh is geographically closest to Appalachia. (Which is even more of a 4 letter word on here than Midwest.) It has influences of multiple regions, it's in somewhat of a geographical transition zone. In terms of this thread it is definitely Rustbelt. The mistake the OP made was making it about Midwestern cities that exist outside that stigma and lumping PGH in.
 
Old 04-30-2016, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,831,191 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
No there really isn't considering Pittsburgh and Western PA has significantly more people than there are in Eastern Ohio and was founded and populated first. It would then be sensible logical to summarize the cultural influence would be from Pittsburgh onto Eastern Ohio, not the other way around. Do you really think we ever to go Eastern Ohio or care much about it in this city? With how unpopulated many of the counties in Ohio nearest to Pittsburgh are and how little there is to see in them, Ohio might as well be 100 instead of 30 miles from Downtown. People on here really think counties with a population of 100,000 or less have major influence on a county with 1.2 million instead of the other way around? LOL
I, along with others, travel to Ohio very often. Ohio is far ahead of Pittsburgh as evidence of the city researching Cleveland's superior public transit. Columbus wins hands down with COL and economy.
 
Old 05-01-2016, 08:59 AM
 
2,166 posts, read 1,467,080 times
Reputation: 2176
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
I, along with others, travel to Ohio very often. Ohio is far ahead of Pittsburgh as evidence of the city researching Cleveland's superior public transit. Columbus wins hands down with COL and economy.
well you are a known Ohio booster who has been doing that for years on this forum, so why wouldn't you travel there? but for some reason you just won't move there... why?

Cleveland's public transit does not match Pittsburgh's; Columbus barely even has a public transit system, and both of those cities have lower income levels per household than Pittsburgh.
 
Old 05-01-2016, 09:28 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,075,878 times
Reputation: 2275
Not quite sure I get this Pittsburgh thing. It's geographically closer to major cities in Ohio, and (at least in my thinking), the border between the states is mostly arbitrary. I wonder why some think when you cross this imaginary line, the world completely changes. Kind of funny.
 
Old 05-01-2016, 10:30 AM
 
Location: NYC/CLE
525 posts, read 448,911 times
Reputation: 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
well you are a known Ohio booster who has been doing that for years on this forum, so why wouldn't you travel there? but for some reason you just won't move there... why?

Cleveland's public transit does not match Pittsburgh's; Columbus barely even has a public transit system, and both of those cities have lower income levels per household than Pittsburgh.
How does Cleveland's public transit not match Pittsburghs? I always consider them even. Cleveland has 4 rail lines, while Pittsburgh has 3. Cleveland has 2 BRT lines while Pittsburgh has 3. That is 6-6 in my book.
 
Old 05-01-2016, 11:20 AM
 
2,166 posts, read 1,467,080 times
Reputation: 2176
Quote:
Originally Posted by usernameunavailable View Post
How does Cleveland's public transit not match Pittsburghs? I always consider them even. Cleveland has 4 rail lines, while Pittsburgh has 3. Cleveland has 2 BRT lines while Pittsburgh has 3. That is 6-6 in my book.
Pittsburgh has significantly higher ridership numbers and percentage usage as well.

http://www.apta.com/resources/statis...rship-APTA.pdf

There's another factor - Pittsburgh also has gated HOV lanes on 279 north of the city, which effectively acts as another busway, making 4. Also, Pittsurgh's busways are dedicated to bus traffic only-- they don't share the right of way with other traffic, they are mostly completely separate roadways and are faster and more reliable, especially during rush hours and other times of major traffic jams.

Last edited by _Buster; 05-01-2016 at 11:45 AM..
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