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Old 04-27-2016, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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I have seen posts on here that claim San Diego can get humid, but that has not been my experience. Perhaps when the "Monsoon" crosses over to west, but not sure how common that is.

Warm, humid temps usually occur east of the Rockies, but as I mentioned earlier, can display in Western WA and OR on occasion. I think this is due to the occasional easternly hot winds combined with marine temperatures. This usually will not last more than a day or two, however.
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Old 04-27-2016, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
I have seen posts on here that claim San Diego can get humid, but that has not been my experience. Perhaps when the "Monsoon" crosses over to west, but not sure how common that is.

Warm, humid temps usually occur east of the Rockies, but as I mentioned earlier, can display in Western WA and OR on occasion. I think this is due to the occasional easternly hot winds combined with marine temperatures. This usually will not last more than a day or two, however.
Southern California can get humid. It feels humid in the mornings along the coast. Though it's not any extreme humidity though. To be honest I don't know if Southern California gets the monsoons, I thought ours came from the East from Texas and quite possibly south from the Gulf of California.
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Old 04-27-2016, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
It seems like your two options are to deal with humidity in big amounts OR to live in a place that will dry you like a towel. I live in one of the super dry places and I enjoy it, however there is one month in Arizona we refer to as "monsoon season" which is typically August, and temperatures drop into the mid-to-low 90s and we exponentially increase to 60% humidity or so after hovering in the teens for humidity a month earlier. This is humid for an Arizonan but probably good or dry compared to some other places in the country, like New Orleans.

Are there places in the country that hover in the 30%-60% range? All the time? I'm just curious because again, as it seems, there is either lots of humidity or lack thereof entirely. Surely there is a middle ground somewhere, yes?
This exists in the great plains. The platte transition area between the rocky mountains and the east coast is just that: intermediate humidity. There aren't many actual cities in that area though. Oklahoma City, Kansas City, Omaha, Des Moines...
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Old 04-27-2016, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Originally Posted by PCALMike View Post
Thats why most parts of the upper midwest, Michigan, upstate NY, Maine etc is not humid in the summer.
Those areas actually can get very, very humid in the summer (as a Minneapolitan, I can attest to that), but it's not a relentless, several-month stretch of oppressive humidity like the South gets in the summer. It's really only bad for a stretch of a few days, broken up with more stretches of beautiful weather in-between. Humid days here generally mean stormy weather is brewing.
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Old 04-27-2016, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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This map shows what humidity levels are generally like in the summer in the US:

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Old 04-27-2016, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
This map shows what humidity levels are generally like in the summer in the US:
Thanks for the map! You can see that southern Arizona is pretty high because late July to mid August is our monsoon season. Most of the year our humidity is much, much lower than that.

Did the source you find that photo also have one for the winter? I'd love to see a winter one too for comparison.

The Plains area makes sense though for moderate humidity! I didn't think about that before making the thread.
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Old 04-27-2016, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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That is a great map, and very accurate. However, you have to compare summer temperatures to this humidity for a true comfort feel.
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Old 04-27-2016, 08:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
Nothing is too dry for me I was just wondering if this kind of humidity even existed in the U.S. For a long period of time. Arizona sees it for a month, but in some ways it's humid considering Arizona hovers in the teens usually. It can't get much lower then that since water is a thing, everywhere. Though the Sahara probably sees lower humidity than we do. Arizona is rather extreme but it's a desert so...

I thought places like Minneapolis are still really humid in the summer? In this case, above 70%?
Minneapolis is just less humid than other parts of the Midwest, but still humid. Seems like a great deal.
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Old 04-27-2016, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Austin
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Because relative humidity is, well, relative, dew point is a better measure of how much water is in the air and how comfortable or uncomfortable it is. Dew point is consistent across all areas while relative humidity is difficult to compare in a meaningful way.

Relative Humidity vs Dewpoint | WeatherWorks
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Old 04-27-2016, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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This is true. When I was in the Twin Cities in late July of last year, they were undergoing a very humid period. The weather folks on radio and tv kept mentioning the dewpoint lowering and how that would bring relief. I think their comfort zone was a dewpoint under 55.
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