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Old 03-01-2017, 10:24 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,480 posts, read 2,226,489 times
Reputation: 2353

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
In Russian, if my knowledge serves me correctly, it's pronounced [dee-VAHN], not unlike the name Devon. I even have a colleague who speaks Russian, and he used to laugh at the name Devon Avenue in Chicago. Perhaps you were thinking French?
It's funny that you brought up Devon Ave, because that's a name we don't say right in Chicago. It should be pronounced like "Devin." Think of how Kevin is pronounced, but substitute a D for the K.
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Old 03-02-2017, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,388,244 times
Reputation: 7710
My boyfriend, a Texan, says "basket" for "shopping cart" something I too, have picked up, even though I joke to him about it. He says "sucker" for lollipop and I know some people that say "slug bug" for "punch buggy."

In Miami, where I grew up, we got some expressions that get funny looks elsewhere. "Eating s**t" is a popular one. It means to "waste time." Also, I noticed this in both Texas and Florida, but if its drizzling outside people say "its sprinkling." I dunno if other states do that.

Words I say myself, not speaking for anyone else but I tend to say "controller" when others would say "remote." And for some reason I can't get myself to pronounce "fodder" right. I say "fudder" and "fawdder" sounds weird to me I say "round-about" and my boyfriend says "traffic circle".

Me and my boyfriend both say "crawdad" and our friend says "crawfish" unless she's with her grandpa, then she says "mudbug" but we never say "crayfish" that's just uncouth! I remember in high school biology we had to dissect a "crawdad" except our teacher called it "crayfish." Sounded so wrong to me. Pretty much me my brother and sister say "crawdad" and we had some as pets.
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Old 03-03-2017, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,389,677 times
Reputation: 8050
"Jawn" in Philly can be used to describe anything, mostly objects and attractive females LOL.


Recently I saw a sticker that read:


"That Jawn is Not My President" LOL
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Old 03-03-2017, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,551 posts, read 3,701,001 times
Reputation: 4147
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
Sigalert

Californian for a gnarly traffic jam: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sig_Alert
Even more interesting, is this term has been used in other cities outside of California. I distinctly remember it being used in Seattle in circa 1979-1988, but they probably had no idea how it originated!
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Old 03-04-2017, 03:19 PM
 
Location: DFW
6,800 posts, read 11,774,932 times
Reputation: 5149
Ramp Up: When a new employee is learning the ropes at a new job.

I suppose this is used everywhere but most commonly in San Francisco tech startups.
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Old 03-04-2017, 04:02 PM
 
45 posts, read 15,245 times
Reputation: 77
In Chicagoland, most people call sneakers "gym shoes."

We never use the word "freeway," which to me is almost a dead giveaway that someone is from California (or more broadly, somewhere on the West Coast); personally, I use the term "highway" for major roads that may or may not have limited access or traffic lights (think about your generic road in the middle of nowhere) and "expressway" for a particularly large type of highway with concrete medians, limited access (entrance/exit ramps), no traffic lights, etc. that is often but not always located in metropolitan areas (basically the large interstate highways like the Dan Ryan, Kennedy, Stevenson, Eisenhower, and Edens Expressways). To summarize my personal convention, all expressways are highways, some expressways are tollways, and not all highways are expressways.

In Northern California, "hella" is a common intensifier that can act as an adjective or an adverb.

Other local terms from around the country:

Hoagie (Philadelphia), hero (New York City), po' boy (Louisiana), grinder (New England)- a sub sandwich
Tonic (Massachusetts)- soda
Treelawn (Cleveland)- the strip of grass between the sidewalk and the road
Mischief night (New York City metropolitan area/New Jersey), devil's night (Detroit)- the night before Halloween
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Old 03-04-2017, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,551 posts, read 3,701,001 times
Reputation: 4147
Quote:
Originally Posted by agun77 View Post
In Chicagoland, most people call sneakers "gym shoes."

We never use the word "freeway," which to me is almost a dead giveaway that someone is from California (or more broadly, somewhere on the West Coast); personally, I use the term "highway" for major roads that may or may not have limited access or traffic lights (think about your generic road in the middle of nowhere) and "expressway" for a particularly large type of highway with concrete medians, limited access (entrance/exit ramps), no traffic lights, etc. that is often but not always located in metropolitan areas (basically the large interstate highways like the Dan Ryan, Kennedy, Stevenson, Eisenhower, and Edens Expressways). To summarize my personal convention, all expressways are highways, some expressways are tollways, and not all highways are expressways.

In Northern California, "hella" is a common intensifier that can act as an adjective or an adverb.

Other local terms from around the country:

Hoagie (Philadelphia), hero (New York City), po' boy (Louisiana), grinder (New England)- a sub sandwich
Tonic (Massachusetts)- soda
Treelawn (Cleveland)- the strip of grass between the sidewalk and the road
Mischief night (New York City metropolitan area/New Jersey), devil's night (Detroit)- the night before Halloween
Treelawn in Cleveland is the same as "parking strip" in Seattle, and most of the west coast. As in "you should be able to park right along the parking strip".
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Old 03-04-2017, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
671 posts, read 1,228,936 times
Reputation: 706
After I moved to Wisconsin years ago, I found out they call a drinking fountain a "bubbler". WTF ?
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Old 03-04-2017, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,513 posts, read 1,602,908 times
Reputation: 4405
Quote:
Originally Posted by agun77 View Post
In Chicagoland, most people call sneakers "gym shoes."

We never use the word "freeway," which to me is almost a dead giveaway that someone is from California (or more broadly, somewhere on the West Coast); personally, I use the term "highway" for major roads that may or may not have limited access or traffic lights (think about your generic road in the middle of nowhere) and "expressway" for a particularly large type of highway with concrete medians, limited access (entrance/exit ramps), no traffic lights, etc. that is often but not always located in metropolitan areas (basically the large interstate highways like the Dan Ryan, Kennedy, Stevenson, Eisenhower, and Edens Expressways). To summarize my personal convention, all expressways are highways, some expressways are tollways, and not all highways are expressways.
All this is 100% accurate. Repped!
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Old 03-08-2017, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Noo Yawk, Noo Yawk
625 posts, read 1,352,963 times
Reputation: 626
How about when people say "inkpen?" I mean, what other kind of pen can it be? Dumb.
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