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Old 05-08-2016, 06:20 PM
 
56,797 posts, read 81,149,048 times
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Here is an interesting list, based upon 2010 census information, for the educational attainment within 5 miles of the core for the top 100 metros in the US: https://www.clevelandfed.org/~/media...sas.xlsx?la=en

Here is the article it came from: https://www.clevelandfed.org/newsroo...1980-2010.aspx
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Old 05-08-2016, 06:45 PM
 
14,015 posts, read 7,471,764 times
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I sorted the spreadsheet by ranking. No huge surprises. The affluent places that don't have a high percentage of their population at the poverty level rank highly. There aren't many poor people who can afford to live in San Francisco. The only surprise to me in the top-10 is Charleston. I don't know the city well enough to understand why it's top-10. Much of South Carolina has pretty big chunks of people at poverty level.

I also wasn't expecting Vegas to be dead last.
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Old 05-08-2016, 07:49 PM
 
7,747 posts, read 4,598,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I sorted the spreadsheet by ranking. No huge surprises. The affluent places that don't have a high percentage of their population at the poverty level rank highly. There aren't many poor people who can afford to live in San Francisco. The only surprise to me in the top-10 is Charleston. I don't know the city well enough to understand why it's top-10. Much of South Carolina has pretty big chunks of people at poverty level.

I also wasn't expecting Vegas to be dead last.
That doesn't explain the high placement of Chicago or the three high-ranking areas in Metro NY? While we're on than subject, I'd like to see a list without multiple entries for the same metro. DC AND Bethesda-Rockville?
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
49 posts, read 39,858 times
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Ugh, they misspelled Worcester as "Worchester" in figure 6d. Poor city isn't even safe in writing.
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,424 posts, read 17,002,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I sorted the spreadsheet by ranking. No huge surprises. The affluent places that don't have a high percentage of their population at the poverty level rank highly. There aren't many poor people who can afford to live in San Francisco. The only surprise to me in the top-10 is Charleston. I don't know the city well enough to understand why it's top-10. Much of South Carolina has pretty big chunks of people at poverty level.

I also wasn't expecting Vegas to be dead last.
You've obviously never been to Charleston. If you had, you wouldn't be asking that question. It's an incredibly cosmopolitan and wealthy city -- the No. 1 small city in the country for QOL, dining, shopping, the arts, etc.

I'm not suprised Vegas is dead last. People with college degrees usually aspire to something more than being a craps dealer or cocktail waitress.
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Old 05-09-2016, 06:06 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,276,387 times
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Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
YIt's an incredibly cosmopolitan and wealthy city -- the No. 1 small city in the country for QOL, dining, shopping, the arts, etc.
This is definitely not true. Charleston city and metro aren't unusually wealthy. Median household incomes are in line with national averages. "Cosmopolitan" is subjective but I don't think anyone would agree that Charleston is "incredibly cosmopolitan".

And "#1 small city in the country for x, y, z" is just totally subjective. You could say this for any metro.
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Old 05-09-2016, 06:22 AM
 
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This is a very arbitrary metric (5 miles from core). It's going to depend on where that magical circle lands. I do demographic mapping for a retail company and we use 3 mile circles as a very cursory evaluation tool but would never believe an arbitrary circle (which doesn't take into account geography, traffic patterns, regional dynamics) was particularly useful to compare.
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Old 05-09-2016, 06:56 AM
 
29,966 posts, read 27,480,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I sorted the spreadsheet by ranking. No huge surprises. The affluent places that don't have a high percentage of their population at the poverty level rank highly. There aren't many poor people who can afford to live in San Francisco. The only surprise to me in the top-10 is Charleston. I don't know the city well enough to understand why it's top-10. Much of South Carolina has pretty big chunks of people at poverty level.

I also wasn't expecting Vegas to be dead last.
Select Cities See Brain Gain - WSJ



Also, with respect to SC as a whole, Columbia (the only other SC metro that was ranked) comes in at a respectable #19.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
This is definitely not true. Charleston city and metro aren't unusually wealthy. Median household incomes are in line with national averages.
Well being that we're talking about a five-mile radius from the core, that would include all of the peninsula and close-in, affluent neighborhoods. Zooming in on that area, it's pretty easy to see how wealthy Charleston is if you're familiar with the city.
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Old 05-09-2016, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,424 posts, read 17,002,626 times
Reputation: 9513
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
This is definitely not true. Charleston city and metro aren't unusually wealthy. Median household incomes are in line with national averages. "Cosmopolitan" is subjective but I don't think anyone would agree that Charleston is "incredibly cosmopolitan".

And "#1 small city in the country for x, y, z" is just totally subjective. You could say this for any metro.
Someone else who's obviously never been to Charleston ...

2015 Best City in North America: Charleston | Travel + Leisure

Charleston voted best city in US - Business Insider

Charleston Wins No. 1 City in the U.S. Award

Everybody Loves Charleston: Voted USA's No. 1 City For Third Consecutive Year
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Old 05-09-2016, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,572 posts, read 754,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I sorted the spreadsheet by ranking. No huge surprises. The affluent places that don't have a high percentage of their population at the poverty level rank highly. There aren't many poor people who can afford to live in San Francisco. The only surprise to me in the top-10 is Charleston. I don't know the city well enough to understand why it's top-10. Much of South Carolina has pretty big chunks of people at poverty level.

I also wasn't expecting Vegas to be dead last.
The poor counties in South Carolina are outside the state's major metropolitan areas, while Charleston is culturally rich, heavily gentrified and with a lot of upscale areas. I'm also guessing that a 5 mile radius from the urban core takes in a lot of unpoplated territory in the Atlantic Ocean or the rivers surrounding the city center, so the less affluent parts of the metro area are outside this radius.

Las Vegas has very low educational attainment due to their predominance of service jobs and lack of white collar professional positions. The economy in that area is very narrow relative to its large population. It's also likely that the more affluent neighborhoods are further away from the urban core - higher income families don't want to live near the bustle of the Strip.
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