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Old 05-10-2016, 01:37 PM
 
790 posts, read 1,051,329 times
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I would agree with Kalamazoo.

Lansing/E. Lansing, kind of disagree with this one. Mainly because if you aren't in state government or at MSU, then there really isn't much point to being in the area. Everything seems to be there to support these two entities. Needless to say, I'm not a fan and wasn't impressed with the area when I was a young professional and I definitely didn't want to stay and raise a family there.

Rochester, MI - Oakland University would be a good example. The university is a focal point, but not "the" focal point of the area. However, now that OU's doing Division 1 sports, the university seems to be on the radar these days with people outside the immediate area. My political friends were excited when during the 2008 presidential race OU hosted one of the many debates that season, but most of the town really didn't care.
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Old 05-10-2016, 02:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
I would agree with Kalamazoo.

Lansing/E. Lansing, kind of disagree with this one. Mainly because if you aren't in state government or at MSU, then there really isn't much point to being in the area. Everything seems to be there to support these two entities. Needless to say, I'm not a fan and wasn't impressed with the area when I was a young professional and I definitely didn't want to stay and raise a family there.

Rochester, MI - Oakland University would be a good example. The university is a focal point, but not "the" focal point of the area. However, now that OU's doing Division 1 sports, the university seems to be on the radar these days with people outside the immediate area. My political friends were excited when during the 2008 presidential race OU hosted one of the many debates that season, but most of the town really didn't care.
This may be the case more now, as the GM presence isn't what it used to be from what I hear. I think it also has the usual health care, insurance, etc. type of industries as well.
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Old 05-10-2016, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas via ATX
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I think Fayetteville, Arkansas is getting to that point. There's so much growth happening here and in the broader metro that I think more in terms of certain areas of the city which are dominated by college life, rather than the entire town. The city itself is only 80,000 people, so more than 1/3 of its residents are students at the university. That percentage seems to be decreasing as the city grows and develops.

There are areas of the city emerging as "hip" and desireable which aren't necessarily right near the campus.

A lot of the newer cultural amenities in the greater Fayetteville area are going into Bentonville, which is 25 minutes north.
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Old 05-10-2016, 08:50 PM
 
Location: West of the Rockies
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Boulder, CO has a life of its own, but it's mostly wealthy aging faux hippies.

Bellingham, WA apparently has a good post-college scene.

Urbana-Champaign, IL is big enough that it has a community outside the university.

Austin, TX is a good one. Definitely not dominated by the university.
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Old 05-11-2016, 12:55 AM
 
Location: New York NY
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Obvious city for this is Boston. Thousands and thousands of students there, several big name schools like BU, Northeastern, Emerson, Suffolk, Simmons, Berklee, with more students streaming through from Harvard, MIT, BC, plus the local community colleges. And there is so much going it's easy to not see Boston as a college town despite its Athens of America rep.
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Old 05-11-2016, 01:16 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Abilene, TX. Has ACU which is relatively well known, but the town itself doesn't overly revolve itself around that. Though it feels like a mix of college town/military town.

Denton, TX. I had the impression before coming here, and shortly after, that this city mostly revolves around UNT and to an extent, TWU, and that it had a more transient student-y population. While UNT does influence life there a lot, and there's a lot of "Mean Green" spirit all over town, its also pretty independent from it. There's a lot of natives who don't even go to college who have a lot of local pride. The city has more to offer than campus life.
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Old 05-11-2016, 11:14 AM
 
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Columbus, OH
Pittsburgh, PA
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Old 05-11-2016, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Atlanta, GA.. Yes, it's very much a college town hidden by a major metro area.
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Old 05-11-2016, 01:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by First24 View Post
Atlanta, GA.. Yes, it's very much a college town hidden by a major metro area.
I would think people would look at it as having college town areas/sections, but not as an overgrown college town.
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Old 05-11-2016, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Columbus, OH
Pittsburgh, PA
Meh, Columbus is pretty hardcore Buckeye.

Boston has tons of students, but it doesn't feel like a college town. There are a few streets in the metro that remind me of some college areas, but overall, it doesn't feel too collegiate.
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