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Old 05-27-2016, 11:10 AM
 
211 posts, read 120,964 times
Reputation: 103

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG-DADDY View Post
Wow. Irvine is impressive. Quarter million residents and no murders. BIG DADDY gives his official stamp of approval.
It's like 50% white 50% Asian lol.
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Old 05-27-2016, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,345 posts, read 683,932 times
Reputation: 1524
San Diego has an impressively low murder rate. I partially attribute that to the high cost of living and also I'm sure a decent amount of border crime goes unreported.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Scary dark alleyways
21 posts, read 9,194 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by McGregorShow View Post
It's like 50% white 50% Asian lol.
What's so funny about that?
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:57 PM
 
44,226 posts, read 62,213,682 times
Reputation: 9268
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The problem with these sorts of lists tend to be this: All municipalities are not created equal.

Let's look at Irvine for example. It's basically just a wide swathe of Orange County suburbia. Yes, it's called a city, has a major UC campus, and 260,000 people. But the exact same swathe of suburbia somewhere in the Northeast would likely be split up between 5-20 different municipalities. Irvine also doesn't have much of a "sense of place."

Even if you're only considering traditional cities, you're not comparing pound for pound because city limits vary considerably. A lot of states in the South, along with some in the Midwest (Indianapolis, Columbus, Kansas City, etc) have wide swathes of suburban neighborhoods within city limits. Crime is often disproportionately concentrated in the old urban core.

The safest "traditional cities" in the U.S., are Jersey City and NYC.
^This and such factors also play a part in regards to economic information as well(median household income, poverty rates, etc.).
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Old 05-27-2016, 02:44 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
10,557 posts, read 15,289,762 times
Reputation: 9258
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
1. Irvine, California (population 236K)
> Violent crimes per 100,000: 49
> 2014 murders: 0
> Poverty rate: 12.6%
> Unemployment rate: 4.1%

Of the 11 cities on the list located in California, Irvine is the safest. With no reported murders in 2014 and a violent crime rate of less than one incident for every 2,000 residents, Irvine is also the safest city in the country. Adults in the metro area are much more likely to be educated than adults across the nation. While 30.1% of American adults have earned a bachelorís degree, 67.7% of adults in Irvine have earned a bachelorís degree, a higher educational attainment rate than in all but four other U.S. cities.

Property crime is similarly rare in Irvine. At roughly 1,253 reported incidents of crimes such as larceny and burglary for every 100,000 area residents, only a handful of cities had a lower property crime rate than Irvine in 2014. By comparison, the national property crime rate the same year was more than double at 2,596 incidents for every 100,000 people.



Read more: The Safest Cities in America - 24/7 Wall St. The Safest Cities in America - 24/7 Wall St.
Follow us: @247wallst on Twitter | 247wallst on Facebook
Save for McAllen, TX, this is a list of large suburbs, not central cities.
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Old 05-27-2016, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
1,436 posts, read 652,445 times
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El Paso metro- in 2015 rate was 1.5 murders per 100,000 with the city halfway between 2 and 3 murders per 100,000. Metro El Paso has 800,000 people.
Austin metro- in 2015 with 2.8 murders per 100,000 with the city halfway between 3 and 4 murders per 100,000. Metro Austin is around 2,000,000 people.

Most of the other cities in Texas that are safe are either suburbs, anchor an area less than 500,000 people (smaller than 500,000 people in metro is basically a large town IMO for Texas cities, or they have no large central city over 200,000 (Mcallen-Edinburgh-Mission Area).
The FBI's List of the Most Dangerous Cities in Texas - Texas Monthly
They sourced FBI ranking of metros by crime rates.
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:15 AM
 
103 posts, read 40,504 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
1. Irvine, California (population 236K)
> Violent crimes per 100,000: 49
> 2014 murders: 0
> Poverty rate: 12.6%
> Unemployment rate: 4.1%

Of the 11 cities on the list located in California, Irvine is the safest. With no reported murders in 2014 and a violent crime rate of less than one incident for every 2,000 residents, Irvine is also the safest city in the country. Adults in the metro area are much more likely to be educated than adults across the nation. While 30.1% of American adults have earned a bachelorís degree, 67.7% of adults in Irvine have earned a bachelorís degree, a higher educational attainment rate than in all but four other U.S. cities.

Property crime is similarly rare in Irvine. At roughly 1,253 reported incidents of crimes such as larceny and burglary for every 100,000 area residents, only a handful of cities had a lower property crime rate than Irvine in 2014. By comparison, the national property crime rate the same year was more than double at 2,596 incidents for every 100,000 people.



Read more: The Safest Cities in America - 24/7 Wall St. The Safest Cities in America - 24/7 Wall St.
Follow us: @247wallst on Twitter | 247wallst on Facebook
One year's data means nothing. You should be using the average over say 5 or 10 years.
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:16 AM
 
103 posts, read 40,504 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarecrow- View Post
That's not terrible at all
Yes it is. That's somewhere around 11 per 100,000 (don't feel like doing the math). The U.S. average is around 5.
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Old 05-29-2016, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Northeastern region
5,444 posts, read 3,762,913 times
Reputation: 1022
Stamford, CT
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Old 06-02-2016, 12:03 PM
 
Location: At my house in my state
637 posts, read 464,248 times
Reputation: 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhTheUrbanity View Post
Yes it is. That's somewhere around 11 per 100,000 (don't feel like doing the math). The U.S. average is around 5.
Yeah well the USA accounts for millions of people in small towns. I'm talking about city averages in America, Columbus is not bad.
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