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Old 07-05-2016, 04:26 PM
 
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No. Depends somewhat on what you mean by "highrise" and "high concentration", though.

No, there is no American city with remotely comparable amount of taller buildings. There are some cities (Miami, Honololu) where highrise multifamily housing is a fairly common typology, but still not to the extent as in NYC, and generally a different urban form. And there are some fairly heavy midrise or highrise urban apartment districts (North lakefront of Chicago for highrise, West end of Washington DC for midrise) but not really comparable to neighborhoods of NYC.
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Old 07-05-2016, 04:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danny07940 View Post
When I lived on SI I had to travel between hospitals in the boroughs and I would pass tons of shorter 5-10 storied mid rises and larger. Mostly housing stock but it was crazy to see how many there were. Philly has a stretch of a few miles of them but I've personally never seen anything like NY. Cool topic though.
If you consider that kind of outer borough housing to be midrise (the 5-10 floor housing typical in Brooklyn, Queens, and Bronx), then the answer is no. No other American city has that as a "normal" housing typology.

The Bronx, especially, is just loaded with buildings between, say 5-15 floors. I mean, almost the entire western 2/3 of the Bronx consists of this type of housing.

Stuff like this, in the South Bronx, is a typology only common in NYC-

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9093592
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Old 07-05-2016, 04:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
If you consider that kind of outer borough housing to be midrise (the 5-10 floor housing typical in Brooklyn, Queens, and Bronx), then the answer is no. No other American city has that as a "normal" housing typology.

The Bronx, especially, is just loaded with buildings between, say 5-15 floors. I mean, almost the entire western 2/3 of the Bronx consists of this type of housing.

Stuff like this, in the South Bronx, is a typology only common in NYC-

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...!4d-73.9093592
Yeah I figured there was nowhere else in the country that resembles The Bronx.
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Old 07-05-2016, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
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Dc
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Old 07-06-2016, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
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Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Dc
DC is a good one. I honestly think DC benefits from the height restriction in some ways. It spreads out the core nicely. Outside the core though, their isn't much.

NYC has like 6k highrises, Chi has 1200, LA has over 500, Honolulu/SF/Houston have between 400 and 500, While Miami/Philly/DC have like 350.

There is nothing like NYC in the US. The core of Philly is dense and highly residential compared to a lot of other cities, but most of the city is dominated by rowhouses. Chicago is still the second city in this category in my opinion. Offering highrise neighborhoods along the water a good distance away from the central core.
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Old 07-06-2016, 01:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
DC is a good one. I honestly think DC benefits from the height restriction in some ways. It spreads out the core nicely. Outside the core though, their isn't much.

NYC has like 6k highrises, Chi has 1200, LA has over 500, Honolulu/SF/Houston have between 400 and 500, While Miami/Philly/DC have like 350.

There is nothing like NYC in the US. The core of Philly is dense and highly residential compared to a lot of other cities, but most of the city is dominated by rowhouses. Chicago is still the second city in this category in my opinion. Offering highrise neighborhoods along the water a good distance away from the central core.
I wonder what why not one other city in the US has a cityscape like NYC
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Old 07-06-2016, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I wonder what why not one other city in the US has a cityscape like NYC
Because other cities didn't need to build that densely. They simply didn't have the high level of job concentration that Manhattan did, and building outward was a real option, rather than making the core significantly denser as NYC did in the 20th century.
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Old 07-06-2016, 01:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I wonder what why not one other city in the US has a cityscape like NYC
NYC is and has been the entry point for immigrants since pretty much the founding of this nation. Since much of NYC's metro was built before the car, there are a lot of dense, mid and high rise apartments clustered around transit. You see this in other places too. Chicago, DC, Boston, and Philadelphia are probably the next best examples. SF too.
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Old 07-06-2016, 02:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Because other cities didn't need to build that densely. They simply didn't have the high level of job concentration that Manhattan did, and building outward was a real option, rather than making the core significantly denser as NYC did in the 20th century.
Yeah that makes sense, but I would think that the dense layout is more convenient for workers getting to the city's core. You have to go way into the outskirts of NYC to start seeing a lot of detached houses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
NYC is and has been the entry point for immigrants since pretty much the founding of this nation. Since much of NYC's metro was built before the car, there are a lot of dense, mid and high rise apartments clustered around transit. You see this in other places too. Chicago, DC, Boston, and Philadelphia are probably the next best examples. SF too.
Philly doesn't have much housing stock bigger than 2-3 story rowhouses, though. Except maybe in Center City.
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Old 07-06-2016, 02:42 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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From my naked eye I would definitely say NY, Chicago, and Miami lead in mid/ high rise residential.

I will say however most definitely do not sleep on DC metro area as a whole. The height limit in DC truly has sped up the amount of high rise residential in the DMV area, its becoming amazing actually. Although the skyline will never add up to those others, the infill of high-rises 25-30 stories scattered so far out from the city core and also within the immediate suburbs is stellar. Within DC proper the amount of 9-14 story buildings on average has to be among the most in the country.
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