U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Is Climate A Significant Factor Causing High Obesity Rates In The US South?
Yes 33 31.13%
No 73 68.87%
Voters: 106. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-11-2016, 05:01 PM
 
379 posts, read 205,113 times
Reputation: 162

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
or the arguments.
No, they just new that it was a waste of time to play chess with a pigeon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-11-2016, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,595 posts, read 4,028,148 times
Reputation: 2933
Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
Just because water is cheaper doesn't mean that you are gonna buy water all the time. Being poor doesn't mean you make smarter decisions with money just because you have less of it. Poverty is correlated with obesity, because another side effect of being poor is having a lower level of education, which factors into making poor choices when it comes to food.
i dont ever remember having classes about food in college. there were classes about the food groups, health, PE classes 1-12th grade. obviously some people who went to college have weight issues, due to same reasons as obesity in poor people.

i think most everybody understands certain foods caught weight gain, and commercials for healty foods also reinforces this. seems like sometimes people treat poor people like they are children.

nobody has any proof of what poor people eat on a daily basis or how much the exercise. you would have to live with them to know this for sure.

i linked to a study upthread that indicated black males tend to become more obese as income increases.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2016, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,526 posts, read 7,481,467 times
Reputation: 10934
I think I might be part of the problem since I just went to shoney's buffet tonight, but I will disagree with the premise that our climate is the problem. (in the South) It is definitely our food. Fried food, sweet tea, BBQ well need I go on?? It is the food.


Also I will point out that some very cold Midwestern states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana are quite fat too, should we blame their cold climate? Too cold to exercise? I suspect the meat, potatoes, beer and cheese culture up there is to blame. Again its the food. We Americans in general are porkers, well we are a food culture. We just love to eat, that is why the world picks at us like we are the fat kid at the dance. Its true, I guess we just need to own it?? Im gonna go get a glass of sweet tea and heat up some left over BBQ ribs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2016, 08:52 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,146 posts, read 1,528,087 times
Reputation: 1850
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I think I might be part of the problem since I just went to shoney's buffet tonight, but I will disagree with the premise that our climate is the problem. (in the South) It is definitely our food. Fried food, sweet tea, BBQ well need I go on?? It is the food.
Excuses, I eat the same type of foods and never have to worry about gaining excessive weight, or dealing with being unhealthy. It's all about preparation, and eating in moderation; you can eat Soul Food and Southern Food while still living a healthy lifestyle, it has been done plenty of times, especially within this decade specifically. Veganism, Environmental Consciousness, and becoming overall active has become more of a norm amongst millennials, even within the South. Cities like Atlanta, Austin, Birmingham, Richmond, Tampa and etc. have done a pretty good job developing multiple environments that combats obesity, even displaying themselves outside of the Top 25 pertaining to obesity.

Southern/Soul Food contains a lot of fruits, grains, and vegetables, people just don't utilize them enough within these meals. (Collard Greens, Black Eyed Peas, Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Potatoes, etc.) Having a Vegan Soul Food platter is very possible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2016, 09:23 PM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
822 posts, read 1,256,504 times
Reputation: 757
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I think I might be part of the problem since I just went to shoney's buffet tonight, but I will disagree with the premise that our climate is the problem. (in the South) It is definitely our food. Fried food, sweet tea, BBQ well need I go on?? It is the food.


Also I will point out that some very cold Midwestern states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana are quite fat too, should we blame their cold climate? Too cold to exercise? I suspect the meat, potatoes, beer and cheese culture up there is to blame. Again its the food. We Americans in general are porkers, well we are a food culture. We just love to eat, that is why the world picks at us like we are the fat kid at the dance. Its true, I guess we just need to own it?? Im gonna go get a glass of sweet tea and heat up some left over BBQ ribs.
The CDC numbers are what people report, so you have to rely on people being truthful. When actual weights are evaluated, the states of North and South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa are in fact the most obese, followed by the southern states and the rest of the Midwest. Generally the western and northeastern states are the least obese, but the numbers are still quite high and it really shouldn't be a celebration. I don't have the link anymore, but it's the CDC report that is widely used.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2016, 10:21 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,572,195 times
Reputation: 2194
The cities in america supposedly so great with low obesity rates would be considered mobidly obese in many parts of the world

compare the obesity rates of the so called fittest cities in america to any low obesity place in the world , the numbers of the fit cities in America would be considered a major national obesity problem in parts of Asia and a few places in the Mediterranean and Europe. The numbers of the fittest and least obese communities and cites in america are comical compared to parts of Asia and the fit cities. An enormous gap

fast food is the major problem

Last edited by floridanative10; 07-11-2016 at 10:31 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2016, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,526 posts, read 7,481,467 times
Reputation: 10934
Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
Excuses, I eat the same type of foods and never have to worry about gaining excessive weight, or dealing with being unhealthy. It's all about preparation, and eating in moderation; you can eat Soul Food and Southern Food while still living a healthy lifestyle, it has been done plenty of times, especially within this decade specifically. Veganism, Environmental Consciousness, and becoming overall active has become more of a norm amongst millennials, even within the South. Cities like Atlanta, Austin, Birmingham, Richmond, Tampa and etc. have done a pretty good job developing multiple environments that combats obesity, even displaying themselves outside of the Top 25 pertaining to obesity.

Southern/Soul Food contains a lot of fruits, grains, and vegetables, people just don't utilize them enough within these meals. (Collard Greens, Black Eyed Peas, Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Potatoes, etc.) Having a Vegan Soul Food platter is very possible.


While I agree with you that moderation is the key to being healthy, and that you can eat Southern and Soul food and remain healthy if you eat it in moderation, however I don't see veganism being common in any way. The millennial people I know eat as much meat, junk food etc as anyone else. Now I am in Tennessee, maybe that has something to do with it. If you lived in CA, FL, or NY I bet you would see more people living vegan. Personally I don't think being some kind of vegetarian as being the key to healthy living. We are designed to eat some meat. Do we eat too much?? yes we do. The healthiest cultures on earth (Asia) eat a lot of fish, chicken, rice and vegetables. Maybe that is the model we should look to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2016, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Huntsville
5,437 posts, read 4,098,082 times
Reputation: 6192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wipe0ut2020 View Post
Personally, I do not think the climate is a factor at all. Just look at how Florida, which has the longest periods of heat and humidity in the US, has lower obesity rates than Washington and Oregon, two states in the cool PNW often times framed as paradise for exploring outdoors.

Instead, it is culture/demographics/education; the Deep South states have low education attainment rates (so they lack knowledge of both the types of practices to be avoided, and the practices that should be done, in order to attain health), and a culture that leads to lack of outdoors exploration (strong conservative politics, with ideology that leads to decline of the various things that contribute to activity: outdoor space, education, healthy food practices, etc). Florida, being that it has strong tourist activity, a strong outdoor culture orientated with the beach, a high international population, and strong local food culture, is able to attain high fitness levels. Overseas, Japan, which has the same climate as the US South, is very healthy, with some of the longest lifespans in the world; again, this is chalked up to education, a healthy food culture, as well as fitness, and avoidance of bad health habits (smoking, lack of activity, etc):
These People Live Longer Than Anyone. Here Are 9 Things They Do - mindbodygreen.com

The US South easily has the climate that can lead to high fitness/health, far superior to much of the country's; the warm subtropical climate allows year-round outdoor activity, and also ease of establishment of a local food culture based around gardening of many tropical/subtropical crops (sugar cane, citrus, bananas, etc), which allow for healthy eating. If Okinawa in Japan can be healthy, then the climate of the South certainly isn't a problem for allowing that region to be healthy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Fatness is 80% food, not activity. So no it's about food choices. Southern food mixed with poverty (poor tend to buy cheaper food which is more calorie dense and nutrient poor).


Mr Roboto is more spot on in this instance.


In the South we spend a LOT of time outdoors. Hunting, fishing, hiking, camping, playing sports, etc.... Education isn't the issue with obesity. It's the lack of funds to buy nutritious foods in some areas. Because healthy foods cost more, many families must buy what they can afford that will make a meal. This often results in a lot of bread, pasta, and fattier/higher carb foods. Given the choice a lot would choose to eat healthier if it were affordable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2016, 11:36 AM
 
379 posts, read 205,113 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nlambert View Post
Mr Roboto is more spot on in this instance.
Everything he said in his post is what I had in my post you quoted. I also went on to include more factors of high obesity in the South/US that he didn't expound on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nlambert View Post
In the South we spend a LOT of time outdoors. Hunting, fishing, hiking, camping, playing sports, etc.... Education isn't the issue with obesity. It's the lack of funds to buy nutritious foods in some areas. Because healthy foods cost more, many families must buy what they can afford that will make a meal. This often results in a lot of bread, pasta, and fattier/higher carb foods. Given the choice a lot would choose to eat healthier if it were affordable.
Lack of education isn't the only factor, but it is a significant factor that can contribute to obesity in many areas, especially in conjunction with poverty. If you notice, the Rust Belt states also run high with obesity, almost as high as the South, despite being in the northern US; those states don't have as much educational attainment, and well as wealth, as other areas of the north. Education is a factor because it grants one the knowledge to identify, say, substances that can contribute to unhealthiness/obesity (unhealthy fats, bad cholesterol, etc), as well as the types of foods/exercises/etc that take care of said substances efficiently. Dealing with such health issues without such knowledge is not as easy as doing so with the knowledge:
Study links lower education levels to higher obesity rates - amednews.com

So lack of funds is a factor, but so is lack of education.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2016, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,595 posts, read 4,028,148 times
Reputation: 2933
cooking at home is cheaper than eating out which tends to be more high calorie food.

and as i've pointed out numerous times, water is much cheaper at home and readily available at home with tapwater and diet soft drinks are same price as sodas. everybody agrees sodas is one o the things americans oveverconsume but hard to make the case it is cheapest drink availabe.


also seems like if a person is truly poor, even if he does eat mostly high calorie food, he can't consume as much it of over time as somebody with more money. i linked to a study that show black men weight increases with income. if you search fast food restaurants on google maps in southern cities, generally there are a much larger number of fast food places near middle class and affluent n'hooods than poor n'hoods. in greenville and my hometown, the poor areas have very little fast foood compared to the others.

also meant to point that the obesity stats are typically presented in per capita terms, per 10,000 residents etc, and per capita stats have a built in bias against relative small population areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top