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View Poll Results: Is Climate A Significant Factor Causing High Obesity Rates In The US South?
Yes 33 31.13%
No 73 68.87%
Voters: 106. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-12-2016, 12:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
Excuses, I eat the same type of foods and never have to worry about gaining excessive weight, or dealing with being unhealthy. It's all about preparation, and eating in moderation; you can eat Soul Food and Southern Food while still living a healthy lifestyle, it has been done plenty of times, especially within this decade specifically. Veganism, Environmental Consciousness, and becoming overall active has become more of a norm amongst millennials, even within the South. Cities like Atlanta, Austin, Birmingham, Richmond, Tampa and etc. have done a pretty good job developing multiple environments that combats obesity, even displaying themselves outside of the Top 25 pertaining to obesity.

Southern/Soul Food contains a lot of fruits, grains, and vegetables, people just don't utilize them enough within these meals. (Collard Greens, Black Eyed Peas, Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Potatoes, etc.) Having a Vegan Soul Food platter is very possible.
Soul food/Southern comfort food and veganism just don't go together LOL.

It's the food. We're not talking about specific individuals like yourself, but overall trends. The food is a huge factor contributing to higher obesity rates in the South.
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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ha. It's not like eat it every day or week either lol. People don't have the time to put all of that together. Especially just one family household.
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Old 07-12-2016, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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It's the traditional Southern diet and poor choices in rural grocery stores. I worked in rural southwest VA and it was almost impossible to find fresh veggies, lean cuts of meat, etc. Almost everything was processed and refined - contrast that with urban areas where there is generally a much better selection and lower prices.
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Old 07-12-2016, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
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I don't think the climate, availability of healthful foods, or access to fitness amenities are much of an obstacle in the more prosperous parts of the South, nor is the region in general substantially worse off than the rest of the nation. In highly disadvantaged rural areas, the situation is considerably worse, but the same is true of depressed places outside the South, like remote Indian reservations in the West and Great Plains. The South actually has an advantage in terms of the long growing season that allows many households to raise their own food rather than being completely reliant on grocery stores.

If hot and humid conditions were correlated with obesity, then southern Florida would be statistically worse off than rural Appalachia - which isn't true. The socioeconomic factors are more important, and focusing on the South's issues with obesity is kind of like focusing on the trees rather than the forest - it's fundamentally a national problem.
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Old 07-12-2016, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
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there is a higher number of obese people living in larger population states outside of the south. people focus on percentage of population but the total number of obese people is the significant statistic. it is difficult to say a state with hundreds maybe thousands less obese people in number has a greater obesity problem than larger population states.

people assume that there is a linear relationship between number of obese people and population.
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Old 07-13-2016, 06:53 PM
 
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Tell you what. I bike. Go out for a bike ride in the Deep South in the middle of summer versus New York or Colorado or California and you will immediately get it. I've ridden in other parts of the country and it almost felt effortless.
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Old 07-13-2016, 07:09 PM
 
379 posts, read 204,230 times
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Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Tell you what. I bike. Go out for a bike ride in the Deep South in the middle of summer versus New York or Colorado or California and you will immediately get it. I've ridden in other parts of the country and it almost felt effortless.
Yes, but what about biking in NY or CO during winter? Also, keep in mind the health and fitness of the Japanese, who live in a country with the same climate as the SE US.
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Old 07-13-2016, 08:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Wipe0ut2020 View Post
Yes, but what about biking in NY or CO during winter? Also, keep in mind the health and fitness of the Japanese, who live in a country with the same climate as the SE US.
They ski. Seriously. Winter sports are widespread in those parts of the country. In the South, it just rains. And it's still humid.
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Old 07-13-2016, 08:59 PM
 
379 posts, read 204,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
They ski. Seriously. Winter sports are widespread in those parts of the country. In the South, it just rains. And it's still humid.
And in the South, people can swim, water ski, sail, surf, dive, etc. And despite hot temps, I see outdoor football, soccer, basketball, etc going on by the mass. Yes, afternoon storms happen, but they are brief, so most of the day is good for activity.

Again, Japan has the SAME climate seen in the Southern US, and they are among the healthiest people on the planet.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:17 PM
 
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Its probably a combination of southern culture/southern style food/poverty levels/education attainment. I feel as though being larger is not as frowned upon in the south, this probably results in overeating or eating unhealthy without shame and judgement from others resulting in less motivation for the populace to be fit. Food in moderation is fine anywhere but once again without a culture to support moderating your gonna get more obese folks and as good as Southern food can be, its definitely a cheat day meal vs. everday routine.
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