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Old 07-13-2016, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Baldwin County, AL
2,446 posts, read 1,051,399 times
Reputation: 601

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People here in South Alabama always say they hate the cold and prefer the heat. Most of them have never been anywhere further north than TN. So for a lot of "hot weather lovers", it is simply what they know. The "hot weather lovers" who move south usually do so for a variety of reasons I've noticed. 1) the whole "Grass is greener" thing. 2) They are sick of shoveling snow. 3)They like to hang out at the pool (most of which do not have a pool....) 4) It is cheaper than MA/CT/NY/etc. 5) They hate the cloudy winters.


Point being, a lot of people are just sick of where they are living, and want to move. They think life is better in FL/AZ/TX, so they move. These are usually the same people complaining about their new place of residence while they sit inside during the hot part of the day. (I am not saying this is ALL people that move south, so don't act like I am saying it is. K? Thanks!)


Personally, I prefer cool to cold weather. My body does not do well in the high heat/humidity conditions in the southeast, where I have lived my entire life. My wife and I are currently making plans to move north, crazy, I know. Both of us prefer fall, winter, and spring to summer. A few weeks of hot weather is great, but when you get into the 4+ months of it, it gets old real quick, especially when you have a job where you have to dress up as I do. It is flat out miserable. It isn't for some, but for me it is.


As for those talking about the nights and mornings, you obviously don't live close to me. Our nights and mornings are so humid you get wet just walking outside. When it is 80 degrees at 6:00am, and 80 degrees at 9pm, it isn't fun. Maybe you guys love sweating while walking your dog at 5am, or constantly being wet with sweat anytime you have to go outside, or eating your dinner outside and sweating your butt off when it is 85 degrees (all of which is perfectly fine), but there are some of us who don't.


It is all preferences, plain and simple. You like the heat? Great! You like the cold? Great! It is a personal thing, period.
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Old 07-13-2016, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Illinois
997 posts, read 601,008 times
Reputation: 1104
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
People here in South Alabama always say they hate the cold and prefer the heat. Most of them have never been anywhere further north than TN. So for a lot of "hot weather lovers", it is simply what they know. The "hot weather lovers" who move south usually do so for a variety of reasons I've noticed. 1) the whole "Grass is greener" thing. 2) They are sick of shoveling snow. 3)They like to hang out at the pool (most of which do not have a pool....) 4) It is cheaper than MA/CT/NY/etc. 5) They hate the cloudy winters.


Point being, a lot of people are just sick of where they are living, and want to move. They think life is better in FL/AZ/TX, so they move. These are usually the same people complaining about their new place of residence while they sit inside during the hot part of the day. (I am not saying this is ALL people that move south, so don't act like I am saying it is. K? Thanks!)


Personally, I prefer cool to cold weather. My body does not do well in the high heat/humidity conditions in the southeast, where I have lived my entire life. My wife and I are currently making plans to move north, crazy, I know. Both of us prefer fall, winter, and spring to summer. A few weeks of hot weather is great, but when you get into the 4+ months of it, it gets old real quick, especially when you have a job where you have to dress up as I do. It is flat out miserable. It isn't for some, but for me it is.


As for those talking about the nights and mornings, you obviously don't live close to me. Our nights and mornings are so humid you get wet just walking outside. When it is 80 degrees at 6:00am, and 80 degrees at 9pm, it isn't fun. Maybe you guys love sweating while walking your dog at 5am, or constantly being wet with sweat anytime you have to go outside (which is perfectly fine), or eating your dinner outside and sweating your butt off when it is 85 degrees, but there are some of us who don't.


It is all preferences, plain and simple. You like the heat? Great! You like the cold? Great! It is a personal thing, period.
Great post. People just need to know what they are in for - then do whatever they want. Up here, too many uninformed people thinking it's paradise in the south. I've lived in AZ, spent significant time in the SE in the summer, and it's brutal as well. Just know what you're doing.
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Old 07-13-2016, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,016 posts, read 646,506 times
Reputation: 2045
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
People here in South Alabama always say they hate the cold and prefer the heat. Most of them have never been anywhere further north than TN. So for a lot of "hot weather lovers", it is simply what they know. The "hot weather lovers" who move south usually do so for a variety of reasons I've noticed. 1) the whole "Grass is greener" thing. 2) They are sick of shoveling snow. 3)They like to hang out at the pool (most of which do not have a pool....) 4) It is cheaper than MA/CT/NY/etc. 5) They hate the cloudy winters.
Are most people who live in Baldwin County, AL from the general area or AL originally? I ask because I have an old friend whose family moved down there from up North, and from her description, it seemed like most of her parents' neighbors were from other states.
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Old 07-13-2016, 08:59 AM
 
31 posts, read 17,515 times
Reputation: 61
It beats freezing and shoveling snow.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,304 posts, read 26,300,037 times
Reputation: 11754
I guess cold weather boosters need to ask themselves why pedestrian and cycling counts are higher on warmer days/months than they are on colder days/months. This is true irrespective of the region of the country. Even Dallas, which has very mild winters compared to the Northeast and Midwest, has significantly lower pedestrian and cyclist counts in January, February and March than it does in June, July and August.

http://www.nctcog.org/trans/sustdev/...eport_2015.pdf

The "hot" cities most people complain about don't experience much in the way of cold. The choice in New Orleans is not so much between cold and hot as it is between cool and hot. Same is true of the Bay Area. In cities where temperature extremes do exist, there is a very clear preference for warmer weather if pedestrian/cycling volume, outdoor activity, and retail sales are any indication of weather preference.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Baldwin County, AL
2,446 posts, read 1,051,399 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Are most people who live in Baldwin County, AL from the general area or AL originally? I ask because I have an old friend whose family moved down there from up North, and from her description, it seemed like most of her parents' neighbors were from other states.
Well, to put it into perspective, I work for a company that has roughly 100-110 people at our branch (depending on the week). Out of those roughly 100 people, I only know of a few from out of state, or at least out of this general area, as we do have a few from the FL panhandle. We have 2 from Ohio, 1 from Indiana, 1 from Chicago, and 1 from Louisiana, but everyone else is from the general area, or at least the state of AL. We have a few from north AL and central AL, a couple from the Biloxi/Gulfport area, but that is it that I am aware of.


There are some transplants in the area though. A lot of them work for places like Airbus and Austal, which are 2 of the largest employers in the area. I know the Ace Hardware Retail Support Center has several people who they transferred from places up north as well. I have noticed that the majority of transplants to this area live in the Fairhope or Spanish Fort area, so if that is where they lived it is certainly possible to have a few from out of state.


We also have the "snowbirds" and retirees that have moved to the southern part of the county (Gulf Shores and Orange Beach), so if they lived down there, it would also be possible to have a few. The vast majority of people who live here however, are from the general area, from my experience anyway.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Baldwin County, AL
2,446 posts, read 1,051,399 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I guess cold weather boosters need to ask themselves why pedestrian and cycling counts are higher in warmer days/months than they are on colder days/months. This is true irrespective of the region of the country. Even Dallas, which has very mild winters compared to the Northeast and Midwest, has significantly lower pedestrian and cyclist counts in January, February and March than it does in June, July and August.

http://www.nctcog.org/trans/sustdev/...eport_2015.pdf

The "hot" cities most people complain about don't experience much in the way of cold. The choice in New Orleans is not so much between cold and hot as it is between cool and hot. Same is true of the Bay Area. In cities where temperature extremes do exist, there is a very clear preference for warmer weather if pedestrian/cycling volume, outdoor activity, and retail sales are any indication of weather preference.
It is very simple.... It is easier to ride a bike in shorts and a T-shirt than it is to ride a bike with sweat pants and a large coat. It is also easier to ride on non frozen sidewalks. There is nothing we need to "ask ourselves", as it is self explanatory.


The question you should ask yourself, is why do you care so much about those of us who prefer cooler weather?
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:18 AM
 
379 posts, read 205,196 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Cooler? Technically, sure. Comfortable? Not a chance. This time of year in Dallas sucks. 95-100 during the day, 76 with 70-80% humidity at daybreak. Windows open? Nope. House is sealed up like a crypt and AC is on 24/7 'til mid-September. I don't miss that garbage at all.
Okay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Same here. It got well below 30 here in DC last winter and if I was ready for it, it was no biggie as well. Taking off clothes won't help you beat the heat.
Yes it does.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,304 posts, read 26,300,037 times
Reputation: 11754
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
It is very simple.... It is easier to ride a bike in shorts and a T-shirt than it is to ride a bike with sweat pants and a large coat. It is also easier to ride on non frozen sidewalks. There is nothing we need to "ask ourselves", as it is self explanatory.
There's nothing difficult about riding a bike with pants on. We're not even talking about "freezing" temperatures here. There are no frozen sidewalks in NYC during the month of May. Here are cycling counts from April and May in NYC on days with zero precipitation.

April 6, 2016 (45 degrees): 11,919
April 28, 2016 (58 degrees): 15,631
May 5, 2016 (57 degrees): 15,638
May 25, 2016 (87 degrees): 26,978

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/download...nt-apr2016.pdf

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/download...nt-may2016.pdf

This is an annual trend. Once the temperature breaks above 60, ridership explodes. Summer tends to have more ridership than any other season.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,350,040 times
Reputation: 970
Hot weather is the best to swim in.
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