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Old 07-13-2016, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,016 posts, read 642,534 times
Reputation: 2045

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I guess cold weather boosters need to ask themselves why pedestrian and cycling counts are higher on warmer days/months than they are on colder days/months. This is true irrespective of the region of the country. Even Dallas, which has very mild winters compared to the Northeast and Midwest, has significantly lower pedestrian and cyclist counts in January, February and March than it does in June, July and August.
Winters in the DFW Metroplex are not cold in the same respect as winters in the Midwest or Northeast, but they're still cold and icy. That's not to mention that, some years, Dallas can be cold from late October to mid-April.
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Old 07-13-2016, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
Where did I say "more" people? You either can't read, or you are purposely misrepresenting what I have said.
These are your words.

Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
According to you though, those "auto-centric disasters" have the best weather. So why wouldn't there be more people out walking around and biking around? There are still areas within southern cities that could be pedestrian friendly.
I don't know if you mean "more people" compared to Chicago or "more people" compared to winter months. We've already gone over the fact that Southern cities generally aren't as walkable as cities like Chicago or NYC. So they are going to have less pedestrian traffic regardless of the temperature.

Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
Reunions are generally held out at parks or beaches, under pavilions or old growth trees in the shade. They aren't usually standing out in the open with it 95 degrees outside. You don't know what you are talking about, Yankee. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Family reunions in the South are held on beaches? Last I checked, parks were "out in the open."

You're adding all of these qualifiers here. You clearly stated...

Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
Ain't many cookouts going on down here during that time of year either, unless the person has a pool, or you consider a couple of guys cooking while everyone else is inside a "cookout"
And that's clearly not true. Any Black person can tell you that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
So let me get this straight.... If 30-35% of people are out during the winter, it doesn't count, but it 30-35% of people are cooking out (It wouldn't be that high but whatever) it is a huge statistical point in your favor? Ridiculous. I live in the south, and I know the south. Trying to tell a southerner what the south is like is just plain dumb. Move down here and see for yourself, otherwise you simply don't know what you are talking about.
Do you have anything to base an argument off of besides your own imagination/personal experience?

In Dallas, which gets pretty hot during the summer, pedestrian and cycling counts increase during the summer months, not decrease. Summer counts in Denton and Ft. Worth are nearly twice as high as their winter counts. And Dallas has very mild winters compared to the Northeast and Midwest.

http://www.nctcog.org/trans/sustdev/...eport_2015.pdf

So no, there is no objective basis for saying that people treat summers down South the same way people treat winters in the Northeast/Midwest. You simply made that up.
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Old 07-13-2016, 12:00 PM
 
Location: The South
5,230 posts, read 3,639,125 times
Reputation: 7926
Quote:
Originally Posted by fwsavemoney View Post
There have been many many threads about this. It's all about personal preference. Some like it hot, some like it cold. OP, as hard is it to believe, some of us do love the heat. No, I don't just go from one air conditioned place to another. I actually enjoy the warm mornings and evenings. I wait for the summer every year. I even mow my lawn in the middle of the day when it is 100 degrees outside. I cannot deal with adding extra layers every time I step outside. I don't like being cold or when it is gray outside with bare trees. Having said that, I completely understand if some people like it cold. Thankfully not everyone is made the same.
My feelings exactly. I love hot weather.We haven't made it to 100 deg. F this year but I'm hoping.

And yes, I have spent some time in cold weather. I was in Korea for one and one half winters and I don't want to ever see cold weather again.
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Old 07-13-2016, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Winters in the DFW Metroplex are not cold in the same respect as winters in the Midwest or Northeast, but they're still cold and icy. That's not to mention that, some years, Dallas can be cold from late October to mid-April.
Dallas had 14 days this past January where the recorded high temperature was 60 degrees or higher.

Dallas January Weather 2016 - AccuWeather Forecast for TX 75202

In 2015, Dallas had 12 days in January where the recorded high was 60 degrees or higher.

Dallas Month Weather - AccuWeather Forecast for TX 75202

That's not to say that Dallas never gets cold days. The point I was making was that if Dallas' summers are so unbearably hot, then that's not being reflected in pedestrian and cycling counts. If colder weather were truly more preferable to hotter weather, then it would stand to reason that Dallas would see more pedestrian/cycling volume in its mild winters than it does during its hot summers.
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Old 07-13-2016, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,933,106 times
Reputation: 10542
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
That's true. But you'd probably get hypothermia if you remained naked in 50 degree weather for an extended period of time.
Generally speaking, you could walk around naked in 50 degree weather for hours if you don't get wet. People run wearing almost nothing in such weather fairly frequently.

It also should be noted that though they might have had some physiological adaptations, the now-extinct native people on the southern tip of South America (Fuegans) basically went around naked in 50 degree windy weather. Their only method of protection from the elements was rubbing animal grease on their skin to ensure they didn't get wet. Some Australian Aborigines also sleep in desert areas where it gets close to freezing, if not freezing, overnight, and they basically wear no clothes.

Our bodies hate being cold for the same reason they generally hate exercise - because it requires us to burn valuable energy stores. Some people in recent years have found you can actually lose weight without changing diet or exercising if you do things like take cold showers and purposefully underdress in the winter.

Last edited by eschaton; 07-13-2016 at 12:13 PM..
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Old 07-13-2016, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Generally speaking, you could walk around naked in 50 degree weather all for hoursif you don't get wet. People run wearing almost nothing in such weather fairly frequently.

It also should be noted that though they might have had some physiological adaptations, the now-extinct native people on the southern tip of South America (Fuegans) basically went around naked in 50 degree windy weather. Their only method of protection from the elements was rubbing animal grease on their skin to ensure they didn't get wet. Some Australian Aborigines also sleep in desert areas where it gets close to freezing, if not freezing, overnight, and they basically wear no clothes.

Our bodies hate being cold for the same reason they generally hate exercise - because it requires us to burn valuable energy stores. Some people in recent years have found you can actually lose weight without changing diet or exercising if you do things like take cold showers and purposefully underdress in the winter.
The human body is better equipped to handle heat than it is cold. We have relatively little body hair (yes, even you, compared to many other mammals) and a built-in cooling mechanism. The body's response to cold temperatures is to shut down. You don't even have to be exposed to "extreme" cold. Hypothermia in most people begins to set in around 40 degrees. That means you stand absolutely no chance in extreme cold without skinning an animal of its fur.
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Old 07-13-2016, 12:19 PM
 
379 posts, read 204,662 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Speak for yourself. I'm sure even if I was naked in 95 degree weather I'd be sweating like mad if I did anything even moderately physically strenuous.
With less clothing, the sweat won't pool as much, and, thus, has a better chance of evaporating.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Norne View Post
Hot weather is for wimps and lazies who spend their days lounging around a swimming pool. It is how one deals with the cold, short grey days and long nights that really bring out the strength of a man.
Whatever helps you sleep better at night.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Winters in the DFW Metroplex are not cold in the same respect as winters in the Midwest or Northeast, but they're still cold and icy. That's not to mention that, some years, Dallas can be cold from late October to mid-April.
I'd say this is more in terms of a window rather than actually being cold. That is, in some years, cold temps can happen from late October to mid April, but the entire period will not be cold. At a certain point south in the US, whatever cold is present comes only in shots, which become less frequent/severe to the point of disappearing all together in places like Central/South Florida, far southern Texas, coastal California, etc.
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Old 07-13-2016, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,933,106 times
Reputation: 10542
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The human body is better equipped to handle heat than it is cold. We have relatively little body hair (yes, even you, compared to many other mammals) and a built-in cooling mechanism. The body's response to cold temperatures is to shut down. You don't even have to be exposed to "extreme" cold. Hypothermia in most people begins to set in around 40 degrees. That means you stand absolutely no chance in extreme cold without skinning an animal of its fur.
Of course you stand no chance if you're naked in below-freezing weather. I was just saying that just because you feel uncomfortably cold in above freezing temperatures does not mean you're going to die of hypothermia. Feeling cold is often your body's way of telling you to do what it can to conserve energy - not that you're going to die in a few hours if you don't get shelter.
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Old 07-13-2016, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,933,106 times
Reputation: 10542
Also, hot weather has been shown by several scientific studies to make us think more slowly and be less productive, even though it also generally makes us happier. Colder weather, in contrast, makes us miserable, but also makes our minds sharper. Sadly this may have something to do with how people from the temperate zones were able to ultimately totally dominate the world, and people from the tropics got colonized.
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Old 07-13-2016, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Of course you stand no chance if you're naked in below-freezing weather. I was just saying that just because you feel uncomfortably cold in above freezing temperatures does not mean you're going to die of hypothermia. Feeling cold is often your body's way of telling you to do what it can to conserve energy - not that you're going to die in a few hours if you don't get shelter.
I don't think you would die within hours if you were fully naked in 40 degree temperatures. I'd say you might die within days without access to cover or fire. If you set two people out in the wild alone--one in a tropical climate and another in a cool climate--I'd be more willing to bet money on the person living in the warmer climate. This is the premise of "Naked and Afraid" on the Discovery Channel and the contestants always freeze their butts off at night.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KEFgAmsWgE
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