U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-17-2016, 07:08 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,799,113 times
Reputation: 11136

Advertisements

Given the more recent trend or more "city" living across the country, it's pretty safe to assume that the once forgotten cores in most cities have become disproportionately more expensive vis-a-vis the suburban areas of their metros. This may be especially true for those cities that exploded with growth during the post WWII auto-era. Many large metros in the sunbelt have a disproportionate amount of suburban development when compared to their urban core/neighborhoods. Many of these metros are also fast growing with strong economies. This means that people are often drawn to them for careers, etc. The rub happens when they come to these cities and want to live "in town" and find that it's very competitive and much more expensive than they presumed. I know personally that this is the case for Raleigh. Certainly one can buy a brand new or "newish" suburban cookie cutter home in a new development for a reasonable price 10-15 miles from the city center but living in the pre WWII parts of the city (when the city was quite small) or in any of the newly built housing DT, expect your housing costs to at least double for the same amount of space. While "Inside The Beltline", or ITB to locals, has always come with a premium, that premium has accelerated as more and more demand is placed on a finite amount of real estate. Even previously "poor" neighborhoods near downtown have seen their property values soar in just the last 5 years with gentrification in full swing. This is a phenomenon that is sometimes unexpected by newcomers. They think that everything is going to be cheap and that you can buy a cool large-ish turn of the century fixer or 1920s bungalow for peanuts. Well, maybe that's the case in the rust belt, but it isn't the case at all in Raleigh. You'll probably pay above market for that fixer. If that fixer has already been "fixed", you'll pay dearly for it. Of course, if you are coming from the SF Bay area or a few other stratospheric RE markets, you'll likely still think it's cheap.
Even the DT condo market, with prices that essentially stood frozen for the better part of the last 8 years, is heating up as demand increases from people who don't want to rent or who can't afford a nice in-town house.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-17-2016, 07:37 PM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,562 posts, read 2,581,868 times
Reputation: 2983
Sacramento, CA
Davis, CA
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2016, 08:02 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,934 posts, read 7,593,436 times
Reputation: 9255
Quote:
Originally Posted by i'm not a cookie View Post
. San Diego- Okay so obviously it's a desirable city but it isn't world class and it's very suburban. It's in southern California so obviously you should expect it to be expensive but MAN! According to realitor.com San Diego is the nation's least affordable housing market in the country when you take into account the wages in the area. The food is extremely expensive and so are the drinks (I'm talking LA prices).
. Sedona, AZ- For a town in Northern Arizona it is extremely expensive...from the food to the resorts to the median home price of $400,000...and the median home value is $430,000. That's more expensive than the average home value/cost in Phoenix, Houston, Dallas, Miami, Austin, Chicago, ect.
The geography, perfect weather and coastal location alone make San Diego exceptionally desirable. The fact that it is an actual city with a decent presence pushes it up all the more so. I mean look at Orange County, Newport Coast. There is nothing there but dense suburbia, with some boutique shopping areas but with stunning coastal topography and equally perfect weather, hence, outrageous real estate values. At least with San Diego you get a city along with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2016, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,119,247 times
Reputation: 7075
Columbus, OH isn't really as cheap as people think. I lived there for 9 months. If you live within 5 miles of downtown and want a nice place, it will cost well over $1,000 a month. I was also shocked at how pricey many condos and homes were in the metro area. And Ohio has a ridiculous amount of taxes (state, city, school district income taxes) and fairly high sales tax rates by county.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2016, 09:56 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,934 posts, read 7,593,436 times
Reputation: 9255
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Columbus, OH isn't really as cheap as people think. I lived there for 9 months. If you live within 5 miles of downtown and want a nice place, it will cost well over $1,000 a month. I was also shocked at how pricey many condos and homes were in the metro area. And Ohio has a ridiculous amount of taxes (state, city, school district income taxes) and fairly high sales tax rates by county.
We were just talking with a young couple at a dinner party from Columbus and they concurred. Yeah, when you get out of the city into the burbs it becomes cheaper but right in the increasingly happening urban core it ain't that much cheaper than many other cites with a much higher profile. The difference between it and other really expensive cities like mine is that you can get several miles outside of the city and it is still crazy expensive in many areas here. It sounds like a pretty nice city right now, but it also does not have the cheap prices of places like Akron or Youngstown.

I would never not live right in the core of a city and that very much speaks to where the value is in just about any happening city in the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2016, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,119,247 times
Reputation: 7075
Personally, I don't like living in a happening place. They're expensive, congested, noisy, pretentious, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2016, 10:59 AM
 
3,067 posts, read 2,511,992 times
Reputation: 3608
Dallas is actually getting expensive, as is Houston Texas. Neither of them make the cut anymore for LOW COL affordable southern cities. Atlanta doesn't, and Raleigh doesn't either. I just took a look at the most recent top ten LOW COL cities that offer a creative vibe, and the only cities that made the list that people usually equate with being cheap were Nashville, Durham, New Orleans, Pittsburgh, and Columbus. The rest of the cities that are typically equated with being inexpensive(Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Raleigh, etc) were not on the list because of the COL. I'm actually surprised that Nashville is--I've been looking at rentals and it seems as though the price to rent in Nashville has increased a lot from where it was when I lived there 5 years ago. It isn't as expensive as Chicago, or most Northeast cities, but it definitely seems to be a lot more expensive than what I remember.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2016, 11:58 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,137,928 times
Reputation: 1850
Boulder has been expensive for quite sometime. They've had building/growth restrictions for 20+ years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2016, 12:52 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,466 posts, read 25,409,755 times
Reputation: 8936
I was surprised how expensive Austin proper was.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2016, 01:24 PM
 
7,703 posts, read 4,562,015 times
Reputation: 8417
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I was surprised how expensive Austin proper was.
I was looking at $1000 apartments when I entertained a job offer in Austin, 16 years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top