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Old 07-15-2016, 08:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I think you can be Rust Belt, but have growth, as it is more about the deindustrialization. Rochester is an area that could fit as a Rust Belt area that has never had a metro population decline and some of these areas have held steady in terms of metro population the years.

Anyway, there are probably other Southern examples, but are likely smaller/mid sized metros.
Well, another thing to consider is how we classify deindustrialization. If we simply use the number of manufacturing jobs as the basis, then the problem is endemic just about everywhere. After all, leaps in productivity through automation simply have eliminated the need for armies of workers. If on the other hand, we look at the number of industries in a given area, it's less clear. After all, twenty years ago, no cars were made in Alabama. Now, several automotive manufacturers are here.
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Old 07-15-2016, 08:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Ah. I see your point. I think the problem lies with the emotional freight that the term Rust Belt carries. To me, it's more a statement of current economic status rather than a state of transition from manufacturing to something else.
Yeah I agree; people tend to have something of a visceral reaction to the term "Rust Belt" because it conjures up post-apocalyptic images and such.
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Old 07-15-2016, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Cbus
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Apparently North Carolina has lost a lot of textile jobs, in part to due to NAFTA, particularly around Greensboro.

"According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of people employed in the textile industry in Greensboro and High Point fell by nearly 6,000 from 2004 to 2011.

At the same time, over half of the statewide jobs in the industry were cut, and the number of textile jobs in North Carolina today is less than a third of the number 10 years ago."

However, Greensboro seems to be experiencing a ton of population growth so I'm assuming it only affected specific neighborhoods and the city has a diverse economy?
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Old 07-15-2016, 08:50 AM
 
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The loss of the textile industry happened all across the Southeastern Piedmont, but none of the areas that were hit particularly hard--the Triad, the Upstate of SC, etc.--could be said to be Rust Belt, plus most of those areas have long recovered. You may be able to make an argument for Danville, VA though, a town which has obviously seen better days.
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Old 07-15-2016, 08:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Apparently North Carolina has lost a lot of textile jobs, in part to due to NAFTA, particularly around Greensboro.

"According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of people employed in the textile industry in Greensboro and High Point fell by nearly 6,000 from 2004 to 2011.

At the same time, over half of the statewide jobs in the industry were cut, and the number of textile jobs in North Carolina today is less than a third of the number 10 years ago."

However, Greensboro seems to be experiencing a ton of population growth so I'm assuming it only affected specific neighborhoods and the city has a diverse economy?
Yeah, one major reason is that area is big into furniture manufacturing. The problem with textiles is that it's a) particularly suited to container ship and b) the orders come well in advance of actually making it into stores. So if you're running a mill in Asia, it's a great business to be in for the American market.

Meanwhile, while furniture has certainly had some overseas competition, the domestic industry has been more resistant to it, and has actually enjoyed a rebound over recent years. For the mid- to high-end furniture market simply doesn't work well for the container-ship model. From order receipt to actual arrival in the home, a better piece of furniture typically takes sixteen weeks -- and that's if the order doesn't come astride the Chinese New Year. Meanwhile a quality American manufacturer can fill that same order in less than half that time. Tell your average customer that she'll have to wait sixteen weeks for a new sofa or dining room table and she'll tell you to jump in the lake.

Further, there are a high number of rejects for container ship because of damages incurred during transit. And the pieces are so expensive and so subject to changes in style and taste, that warehousing huge amounts in hopes of eventual sale does not work well.

As a result, American furniture manufacturers -- at least the ones that updated their antediluvian processes -- have done pretty well. As far as textiles are concerned, what's left of the domestic industry has to stop thinking in commodity terms and really innovate. Here's a pretty good success story as one example: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/31/fa...s-alabama.html
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Old 07-15-2016, 09:49 AM
 
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Chattanooga is a perfect example - heavy industry that suffered a decline, including steel plants.

Now, of course it is making quite a comeback.
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Old 07-15-2016, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Cbus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
The loss of the textile industry happened all across the Southeastern Piedmont, but none of the areas that were hit particularly hard--the Triad, the Upstate of SC, etc.--could be said to be Rust Belt, plus most of those areas have long recovered. You may be able to make an argument for Danville, VA though, a town which has obviously seen better days.
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
Chattanooga is a perfect example - heavy industry that suffered a decline, including steel plants.

Now, of course it is making quite a comeback.
It seems that the south has plenty of areas that suffered from manufacturing job loss but were able to bounce back much quicker than northern counterparts.
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Old 07-15-2016, 10:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
Chattanooga is a perfect example - heavy industry that suffered a decline, including steel plants.

Now, of course it is making quite a comeback.
Chattanooga is a great example.
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Old 07-15-2016, 10:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
It seems that the south has plenty of areas that suffered from manufacturing job loss but were able to bounce back much quicker than northern counterparts.
Yep and there are a couple of reasons for that: cheaper costs of doing business, lack of unions, the Sunbelt population boom, etc.
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Old 07-15-2016, 11:03 AM
 
56,679 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Well, another thing to consider is how we classify deindustrialization. If we simply use the number of manufacturing jobs as the basis, then the problem is endemic just about everywhere. After all, leaps in productivity through automation simply have eliminated the need for armies of workers. If on the other hand, we look at the number of industries in a given area, it's less clear. After all, twenty years ago, no cars were made in Alabama. Now, several automotive manufacturers are here.
Good points, as manufacturing employment peaked in 1979, but due what Mutiny77 mentioned, the growth of manufacturing in parts of the South is hard to deny.
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